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Prox B or Bust

The Morning Heresy  with Paul the Morning Heretic
August 25, 2016

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.

Astronomers discover an Earth-like planet orbiting within the "Goldilocks zone" of the star closest to our own, Proxima Centauri, 4.2 light-years away. It's a huge, huge deal. "The planet’s proximity to Earth gives hope that robotic probes could someday be zooming past the planet for a close-up look," writes Kenneth Chang at NYT. The planet is for now designated "Proxima Centauri b" or "Proxima b" and I'm seeing it shorthanded sometimes as "Prox b," which begins to sound like a California ballot measure.

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The School Auditorium Ghost

Investigative Briefs  with Joe Nickell
August 24, 2016

Sometimes a ghostbusting skeptic just gets lucky. So it was, following my luncheon speech at a CFI conference, when an attendee told me she knew the true facts behind the “haunting” of Pembroke Middle School in Corfu, N.Y.

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No One Blows Like Gaston

The Morning Heresy  with Paul the Morning Heretic
August 24, 2016

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.

It's pit bulls and the paranoid on Point of InquiryLindsay Beyerstein talks to Bronwen Dickey about 1) the myths about pit bulls and 2) the "Conspira-Sea Cruise" that she reported on for Popular Mechanics (and to which I linked in a previous Heresy). 

Yesterday we announced that at CSICon this October, the Balles Prize in Critical Thinking will go to Julia Belluz of Vox.com. If you read the Heresy, you already know how awesome she is, and what good she does exposing pseudoscience nonsense. 

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Humanism and the Born-Godless

by David R. Koepsell
August 23, 2016

My kids and I are part of a growing set of people who were born and raised without religion. This trend poses a challenge for those of us who consider ourselves not just atheists, but humanists. Having been born without a religion, only curiosity and pragmatic concern made humanism, as a school of inquiry, relevant to me. It did not come from a rejection of once-held beliefs. It had to offer more, standing on its own. 

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