The mission of the Center for Inquiry is to foster a secular society based on science, reason, freedom of inquiry, and humanist values.

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Your Beak is Too Short

The Morning Heresy  with Paul the Morning Heretic
July 31, 2015

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.      

The CFI Leadership Conference is underway, and I have been dubbed the Captain of the Merchandise Table (okay I dubbed myself that, but I think I need four rank insignia pips). 

We announced our support this morning of a House resolution by Rep. Tusli Gabbard urging Bangladesh to seriously address violent extremism, in the wake of the murders of atheist bloggers by Islamists. 

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Could a Machine Think?

The Outer Limits  with Stephen Law
July 31, 2015

Here's a (long) animation script I wrote that introduces the philosophical puzzles of whether machines could think. The idea is it would be one of a series on the 'Big Questions'. Anyone interested in producing it, let me know...

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Caffeine and Pickled Vegetables

The Morning Heresy  with Paul the Morning Heretic
July 30, 2015

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.      

The CFI Leadership Conference kicks off this evening, and I'm currently in transit. (I mean, right now I'm sitting at my computer, but, like, today I'm mostly traveling is what I'm saying, not like I'm driving and typing at the same time.) The theme is "Moving Freethought Forward," and I think my job is to make sure that while we're moving it forward we don't bump it into walls or knock over anything expensive. 

With Berkeley, CA's new warning label law for cell phones, Carina Storrs at CNN looks at what the science actually says about radiation and phones...

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From N-rays to EM-drives: when does science become pseudoscience?

by David R. Koepsell
July 29, 2015

A fair amount of pseudo-science begins as blue-sky, basic scientific hypotheses and experiments. Hypotheses can challenge basic accepted notions, or begin with them, and may yet somehow go off the rails. How does this happen, and at what point do scientific inquiries become obsessive or pathological?

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