Firefighter’s “Miracle Recovery”

July 09, 2013

At 6:54 a.m., December 29, 1995, the roof of a burning house collapsed on Buffalo fireman Donald J. Herbert. Before being rescued he had been starved of oxygen for some six minutes, resulting in brain damage. For almost the next decade he was in a minimally responsive state, unable to communicate effectively.

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The Golden Rule(s)

July 02, 2013

The Golden Rule—a common-sense ethical principle based on mutual empathy—is shared by numerous religious and philosophical traditions. For example, there is Judaism’s Torah verse: “. . . Love your neighbor as yourself” (Leviticus 19:18). The popular Christian version (paraphrasing Jesus from Matthew 7:12) is, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” And so on—in Islam, Buddhism, and many others, including Humanism. (See “Golden Rule,” online at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_Rule.)

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“Now You See Me”—A Nickell-odeon Review

June 26, 2013

Now You See Me is the story of a four-magician team that somehow pulls off stunning heists while performing, and then, in Robin Hood style, showers their live audiences with the loot—all the while dogged by the FBI and Interpol. Could we ask for more?

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“Haunted” Country Store

June 14, 2013

In a little store in the village of Clarence, New York, items tumble from shelves, pictures fall from walls, and the front door mysteriously opens, while from upstairs come the sounds of eerie footsteps and moving furniture. Previously a candle shop, its employees reportedly believed ghosts were to blame.

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Announcing “The Science of Miracles”

June 12, 2013

In case you haven’t heard, my new book—The Science of Miracles: Investigating the Incredible (Prometheus 2013—is out. The BBC’s magazine Focus has already honored it as its science-book-of-the-month for June. Here is what some distinguished people have said about it:

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Shroud—Further Update

June 03, 2013

Just in time for Easter 2013 (as readers may recall), a new book claimed recent tests proved that the Turin “shroud” was not medieval, as carbon-14 tests had shown, but instead dated from the first century. The Archbishop of Turin, however, dismissed the results, because the fibers tested could not be authenticated as having actually come from the shroud. (As I pointed out in my blog of March 28, the tests were highly doubtful in any case.) Also, the new pope, Francis I, revealingly referred to the cloth as an “icon” (i.e., a work of art) rather than “relic” (which it would be, in Catholic parlance, if it had actually wrapped the corpse of Jesus).

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The Pope’s Non-Exorcism

May 28, 2013

An exaggerated claim that transformed a simple prayer by the new pope into an “exorcism” has sparked controversy—provoking denials from the Vatican and a retraction from at least one church media outlet.

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“Renoir”: A Nickell-odeon Review

May 21, 2013

[Pierre] Auguste Renoir (1841–1919) was, with Claude Monet and other French painters in the 1860s, a founder of Impressionism, a movement allied with artistic Naturalism. Its adherents sought to paint real life directly from nature—among their goals being to capture light’s changing effects. Why do we care? Because appreciation of art is part of what makes us truly human. As philosopher Paul Kurtz stated, speaking of secular humanist values, “We are engaged by the arts no less than the sciences.”

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“42”: A Nickell-odeon Review

May 17, 2013

My first understanding of the moral imperative of racial integration probably came from my father. He had been a talented baseball pitcher in college (with, I’m told, an impressive all arms-and-legs delivery and a tremendous “slider” ball). I think some part of him always regretted giving up that tentative career for a sensible job and the role of family man, and he often talked baseball. I listened especially well during the fifties and sixties when that conversation turned to civil rights, and he would tell of having played against, and even at times bunked with, what were then known as “Negro” baseball players. That he considered them unquestionably equals no doubt helped spark my own involvement in the civil rights movement (especially during 1964–68).

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Bigfoot Legend, Bob Gimlin

May 13, 2013

When I attended Bigfoot School April 27 at Chautauqua Lake, New York, among the six signing my diploma was a man named Bob Gimlin, an 82-year-old horse trainer from Yakima Valley, Washington.

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