I Say We Will Have No More Marriages (When We’re Dead)

November 13, 2013

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities. 

This is very cool. The Library of Congress officially opens the Seth MacFarlane Collection of the Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan Archive

Please make sure you're in a stable psychological place before you look at this: Christopher Ketcham at Vice reports on the horrifying "child-rape assembly line" within ultra-Orthodox Judaism. Sam Harris on Twitter suggests, "Perhaps we should send SEAL Team 6 into Brooklyn."

Pope: I say we will have no more marriages. In the afterlife. (I wonder if those who are married already shall keep as they are.)

The Economist: The UN Human Rights Council can't really be taken seriously with all those human rights violators serving on it. 

Joseph L. Flatley at The Verge explores the very real devotion to the Necronomicon and Lovecraftian lore.

Ben Radford likens "secular" sanctification of the sites of tragedies (such as Sandy Hook Elementary) to pseudoscientific beliefs about events leaving "psychic traces." 

CFI-LA's Jim Underdown visits the Sunday Assembly, and gives it a thumbs-up, despite "not [being] a pep rally kind of guy." 

Norway considers new legislation to "regulate ritual circumcision." 

Stanford starts a law school clinic on defending a conservative version of religious liberty, noting, "They will avoid the other side of the issue — challenging government endorsement of faith." Because, you know, why bother?

Sam Harris interviews Yale psychologist Paul Bloom about the origins of morality

Kansas City Star reports on the rescue mission that refuses the dirty, dirty help of dirty, dirty atheist volunteers

HuffPo "listicle" (oh there must be a better word for these) rounds up "interfaith faces" of the military, including Paul Loebe of American Atheists (who looks pretty sullen in the included image).

Toothpaste for Dinner suggests each one of us may be surrounded by about 14 ghosts per person

University of Westminster study shows that heavy metal has a connection to secularization:

Appreciation for metal was also associated with a higher-than-average need for uniqueness, and lower-than-average levels of religiosity. “It is possible that this association is driven by underlying attitudes towards authority, which may include religious authorities,” [the authors] write. 

Fake historian David Barton says soldiers returning from combat shouldn't actually be getting PTSD, so, I guess they should stop having it. Because the Bible. 

Francis Collins promotes a détente between science and religion:

I would not want to look forward to a culture where science lost and religious faith became the dominating force for truth.  I would not want to live in a culture where faith lost and science, with all of its reductionism and its materialism became the sole source of truth.  

On December 8, CFI-DC hosts Nathan Schneider, author of God in Proof: The Story of a Search from the Ancients to the Internet

Four score and seven years ago, who'd'a guessed that Gettysburg would be crawling with ghost hunters

Washington Times piece complains that atheist protesters "interrupted" a prayer vigil outside the Supreme Court last week.  

Quote of the Day

Razib Khan reflects on his own experience among enclaves of vaccine denialism, and suggests fighting peer pressure fire with fire:

Conscience is a value which Americans pride, even unto death. I do not see the powers that be intervening in these cases. Rather, this groundswell of denialism must be countered by public opprobrium, and yes, shaming. Peer pressure kills, but it can also save lives. 

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Comments:

#1 Randy (Guest) on Wednesday November 13, 2013 at 8:07pm

“I would not want to live in a culture where faith lost and science, with all of its reductionism and its materialism became the sole source of truth.”

Well good.  Science will tell you that they don’t find out the truth.  But they do tell you that they are indisputably the best way to get incrementally closer to the truth.  This isn’t something that is culturally-dependent either.  The culture can bury its head in the sands of faith, but truth is unknowable, and science is the best (really, only) tool to approximate it.

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