Insidious Superfluous Consonants

March 31, 2016

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.      

Housekeeping note: No Heresy tomorrow, which is good, because it'll be April 1, and that means a miasma of not-funny hoax news pieces that I'm perfectly content to avoid sifting through.

Morton E. Tavel's Skeptical Inquirer cover story on why lie detectors are more or less crap is now online, and it's good stuff. He says:

Given such overwhelming evidence of inaccuracy as I have presented here, how can we, as a society, react to such a perversion of science? The logical solution is to completely abandon this method of testing.  

Virginia's Gov. Terry McAuliffe vetoes the crap out of another one of these "religious freedom" anti-LGBT bills, saying, "it equates to discrimination under the guise of religious freedom." I would like to note that McAuliffe once wrote that I was the best media researcher in the universe when I worked on the first Hillary Clinton campaign, but of course he had just met me that second and was signing his book for me, and, let's be honest, he's a guy who really likes to foment enthusiasm. I still have it of course. 

Stephen Law looks at the cause-and-effect confusion surrounding things like jihadism, and cautions everyone to avoid simplistic explanations

Robert Bruce, a mortician, writes at Sojourners about what he's learning from humanists and their funereal preferences:

It’s worth noting that humanism is not against religion. As a religious person, I have always been made welcome at these funerals and, in turn, I accept the personal beliefs of the deceased. Regardless of the religion or non-religion of the funeral, making the attendants feel welcome is important for making any differences feel minute and acceptable.

Trump says women should be punished for undergoing abortions if abortions are altogether outlawed, and then wait wait wait that's not what he meant wait wait REAGAN. 

The FDA eases some of the restrictions for access to the "abortion pill." 

Crowds in Pakistan were protesting for days the execution of a blasphemy-law-vigilante who murdered a governor critical of the law, and Pakistan has gotten folks to calm down by saying 'don't worry, we're not doing away with the blasphemy law.'

Matt Ford at The Atlantic looks at what the hell is going on with that weird court-order-slash-compromise that came from the Supreme Court yesterday in Zubik v. Burwell

A new study shows that the countries most likely to produce ISIS recruits are French-speaking. I bet it's all those superfluous, unpronounced consonants always mushed together in a row. They drive me nuts.

I had no idea that the Denver Airport was so creepy, but holy moly. The New Zealand Herald wonders at this, and cites a little Skeptical Inquirer.  

Dude! UU's! I thought we were cool!   

Quote of the Day:

Now we have a bill in Tennessee that would allow mental health providers to discriminate against anyone they like (cough-GAYS-cough), again, because religious freedom. The American Counseling Association is all, like, no:

The needs of the client are always a top priority, according to universally taught principles in counselor education, rather than the personally held beliefs of the counselor. This tenet is a civic and professional responsibility for those who are professional counselors. 

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Original image by Shutterstock

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Comments:

#1 Randy (Guest) on Friday April 01, 2016 at 1:01am

“The needs of the client are always a top priority, according to universally taught principles in counselor education…”

Unfortunately this is not actually the law (maybe it is there, but not everywhere).  I recently saw a video of a guy on YouTube who had sought mental help to deal with violent thoughts, only to be reported to the police due to a mandatory reporting law.  In the news, a woman had tried to cross the border, and discovered that her suicide attempt had been reported to the OTHER COUNTRY’s border guards and was used to deny her entry.  With events like these in the public consciousness, it should be no surprise that mental health is such a problem, because people cannot trust that their “treatment” won’t be used to harm them.

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