65 Million Dollars of Belief

April 24, 2015

The Morning Heresy is your daily digest of news and links relevant to the secular and skeptic communities.      

I went on HuffPost Live yesterday, along with other smart folks that included CSI Fellow Steven Novella, to talk about the Oz Imbroglio, just as Oz's own coworkers pen an op-ed saying not to fire the guy, but to maybe regulate him a bit. On my own blog iMortal, I posit that the last few months have been pretty good for exposing science denial for the crap that it is. 

The Charleston Gazette editorializes against Oz-like TV pitchmen, and cites the latest special issue of Skeptical Inquirer

CFI leads a coalition of groups urging the State Department to pressure Bangladesh to take more seriously the threat to freethinkers there, in the aftermath of the Roy and Rahman murders.

Hey there, creative types, don't forget to submit your wacky atheist sitcom ideas to the No God But Funny Contest, which ends May 15!

The New Republic has a big piece on atheists in the Arab world by Ahmed Benchemsi. 

A bit of advice, as long as Joe Nickell's around, stop trying to make something out of the Shroud of Turin faux-controversy, as National Geographic just did. Joe says:

Written by Frank Viviano, the article “Why Shroud of Turin’s Secrets Continue to Elude Science” (2015) is so misleading, so replete with falsehoods, so lacking in basic facts about the notorious “shroud” that it is an affront to the proud name of National Geographic

Oklahoma's legislature is very, very concerned about the poor, oppressed clergy and judges who might have to perform same-sex marriages against their alleged "consciences," so they passed two bills.

Two woolly mammoths get their entire genomes decoded. Next up: 3D printing of wooly mammoths.

Creflo Dollar, who wanted people to buy him a $65 million jet, said this:

If I want to believe God for a $65 million plane, you cannot stop me. You cannot stop me from dreaming. I’m gonna dream until Jesus comes. ... I dare you tell me I can’t dream. I dare you tell me that I can’t believe in God. If I find Jesus, I’m going to look at Jesus until it comes to pass. Because with God all things are possible, to him that believes. 

Um, what? 

Quote of the Day:

George Skelton at the LA Times says of the California vaccination legislation:

It's pathetic that more legislators aren't fully embracing a bill that essentially would tell parents: Vaccinate your kids against infectious diseases or they won't be allowed in school where they could jeopardize the health of other children. ... Americans do have freedom of religion — but not the freedom to jeopardize the health of other Americans.

 
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Original image by Shutterstock.

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Comments:

#1 Thomas B (Guest) on Friday April 24, 2015 at 7:31am

“Oklahoma’s legislature is very, very concerned about the poor, oppressed clergy and judges who might have to perform same-sex marriages against their alleged “consciences,” so they passed two bills.” —

Okay, it makes sense to me that clergy shouldn’t be required to solemnize marriages that they don’t approve of.  That’s church-state separation at work.  But a judge or justice of the peace should be required to follow what the law says.  If the law says they are legally eligible, I don’t see how he can refuse.

#2 Randy on Saturday May 16, 2015 at 4:00am

“It’s pathetic that more legislators aren’t fully embracing a bill that essentially would tell parents: Vaccinate your kids against infectious diseases”

Fixed That For You (and Skelton).

I agree with the ACLU that tying this to education is both irrational and probably unconstitutional.

Put another way, stupid parents shouldn’t be able to put us all at risk (in two ways) by stunting their kids’ education.

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