In U.N. Speech, Egypt’s Morsi Rejects Broad Free Speech Rights

October 08, 2012

From the Los Angeles Times:

Egypt's recently elected President Mohamed Morsi on Wednesday rejected President Obama's view of free speech rights and made plain his ambition to seize greater influence for the Arab world's most populous country.

Morsi, in his debut speech to the U.N. General Assembly, said Egypt intended to lead the way in resolving Syria's civil war, pressing the cause of Palestinians and defusing the threat of nuclear proliferation in the Middle East.

He also said that though his country now embraces democracy and human rights, it would not accept the categorical approach to free speech that Obama urged at the United Nations and would not tolerate insults to religion.

"Egypt respects freedom of expression," he said, but "one that is not used to incite hatred against anyone. One that is not directed toward one specific religion or cult."

He called on the U.N. to consider international action to crack down on speech that defames religions.

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