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Spiritual Humanism
Posted: 24 June 2011 11:59 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I am really anticipating some feedback here, it would be of great help to me.

Is anyone familiar with the term spiritual humanism? If so, what do you think of this movement? There is currently a Church of Spiritual Humanism that ordains people so they can preform weddings for non religious people. I have personally talked with an individual who his ordained through this church and has conducted many weddings and ceremonies for freethinking rational people that do not desire a religious clergymen to officiate their wedding. 

Thank You very much

Carson

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Posted: 25 June 2011 05:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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carsonallen - 24 June 2011 11:59 PM

I am really anticipating some feedback here, it would be of great help to me.

Is anyone familiar with the term spiritual humanism? If so, what do you think of this movement? There is currently a Church of Spiritual Humanism that ordains people so they can preform weddings for non religious people. I have personally talked with an individual who his ordained through this church and has conducted many weddings and ceremonies for freethinking rational people that do not desire a religious clergymen to officiate their wedding. 

Thank You very much

Carson

CFI has something similar. You can see it HERE
I’ve thought about it. Sounds like if you do this and become a notary, you can officially marry people depending on your state. But I’m not positive.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 06:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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“Spiritual humanist” sounds like an oxymoron to me. I don’t really know anything about the organization, but by the title, anyone who creates a Church Of Spiritual Humanisn is playing word games. We already have people who can perform weddings for non-religious people. They’re called judges.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 06:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 25 June 2011 06:28 AM

We already have people who can perform weddings for non-religious people. They’re called judges.

Worked great for my wife and me! The judge’s secretary brought brownies and we had fun. The money that might have gone to a fancy wedding went instead toward a vacation on the Hawaiian islands and lots of SCUBA diving, biking down mountains, luaus, and… of course ... the fun stuff.  tongue wink

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Posted: 25 June 2011 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Most women I know like a nice wedding. They like the dress, the cake, and the whole nine yards. They want their day to be special, and why shouldn’t they? There are just some things a judge cannot provide.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 11:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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carsonallen - 25 June 2011 10:34 AM

Most women I know like a nice wedding. They like the dress, the cake, and the whole nine yards. They want their day to be special, and why shouldn’t they? There are just some things a judge cannot provide.

Yep, it’s a personal choice. Fortunately, my wife was the one who chose our path.  cheese

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Posted: 25 June 2011 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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There’s no oxymoron here.  The beliefs one has based on humanism do tend to militate against theism, but ( and I can’t understand it) spirituality and theism aren’t necessarily connected.  I recall a Unitarian minister who stated she was a spiritual atheist.  And, quite a few years ago when I went to a Unitarian Annual General Assembly, there was a hall with quite a few display booths.  The American Humanist Assoc. and the Secular Humanists each had one, but there was also a booth for the Religious Humanists.

Occam

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Posted: 25 June 2011 01:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Hello Occam

I agree with your reply. Also, James Cook(Harvard Humanistic Chaplaincy) is a promoter of “Optimistic Humanism” which I believe could be a form of spiritual humanism. There is also a group called The First Church of Atheism”. I don’t particularly like when someone puts the word “church” in their title. However, it is very unfortunate about the stigma that comes from the term spiritual humanism. It tends to fluster fellows like Andrew. But I can tell you that there are many, many, people who are humanist that consider themselves spiritual. As Austin Cline writes

Spirituality seems to be one of those words which has as many definitions as it does people trying to define it. For some people, it involves a variety of very personal things like self-realization, philosophical searching, etc. For many others, it is something like a very deep and strong emotional reaction to “wonders” of life — for example, gazing out at the universe on a clear night, seeing a newborn child, etc.

That’s all were are talking about here, nothing supernatural, nothing metaphysical, and that is completely comparable with humanism.  And dare I say it’s probably the majority view amongst humanists.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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As Confucious says, we need to define our terms first. If spiritiality means all of that, then I guess it makes a bit more sense. But then, the word is damn confusing. When I see the word “spiritualism,” the root word is “spirit” which has clear connotations. There should be a better word for “a variety of very personal things like self-realization, philosophical searching, etc.”

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Posted: 25 June 2011 04:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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When are we going to learn that words are only shorthand ways of expressing thoughts, feelings, experiences, etc.? They are not of primary importance. They are only tools, which people use in a variety of ways.

Screw trying to figure out what “spiritual humanism” means. Can the obsession with labels. State your vision, live accordingly and move on.

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I cannot in good conscience support CFI under the current leadership. I am here in dissent and in support of a Humanism that honors and respects everyone.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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@TromboneAndrew
Precisely, I guess that is why when people hear the word spiritual they could come to a conclusion that it is something immaterial. A better word is probably needed.

Here is the definition from their website

A religion based on the ability of human beings to solve the problems of society using logic and science.

Most people need a religion to help guide them through life’s challenges and difficult moral decisions. Recognizing how the power of religious rituals, methods, and communication can impact human behavior, Spiritual Humanism fuses traditional religious behaviors onto the foundation of scientific humanist inquiry.

While it is impossible to remove age old traditions from human culture, we can redirect them by redefining their underlying significance and meanings. Spiritual Humanism is natural, not supernatural. By using a method of scientific inquiry we can define the inspirational, singular spark inherent in all living creatures.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 08:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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carsonallen - 25 June 2011 06:52 PM

@TromboneAndrew
Precisely, I guess that is why when people hear the word spiritual they could come to a conclusion that it is something immaterial. A better word is probably needed.

It hardly ever succeeds. Words evolve not by plan but by usage. Language is an immediate means of communication, by which I mean that people use words as they come to mind. Like it or not, this is the word we are going to have to use if we hope to communicate to maximum effectiveness. We just have to make clear that we are using it consistent with scientific naturalism.

carsonallen - 25 June 2011 06:52 PM

@TromboneAndrew
Here is the definition from their website

A religion based on the ability of human beings to solve the problems of society using logic and science.

Most people need a religion to help guide them through life’s challenges and difficult moral decisions. Recognizing how the power of religious rituals, methods, and communication can impact human behavior, Spiritual Humanism fuses traditional religious behaviors onto the foundation of scientific humanist inquiry.

While it is impossible to remove age old traditions from human culture, we can redirect them by redefining their underlying significance and meanings. Spiritual Humanism is natural, not supernatural. By using a method of scientific inquiry we can define the inspirational, singular spark inherent in all living creatures.

I agree with and endorse this.

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I cannot in good conscience support CFI under the current leadership. I am here in dissent and in support of a Humanism that honors and respects everyone.

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Posted: 25 June 2011 09:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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They seem to be using a vey wooly definition of spiritual as anything that feeds the human need for religious experience that is not actually a theistic religion.  That’s clearly a need begging fulfillment for some, and it’s a usage of the term that would ring true for many.  But those people haven’t thought about it very hard—the term clearly implies dualism, and it doesn’t sound like that’s what this organization espouses, so they shouldn’t use it.  It’s not mere semantics, but an extremely important distinction—rejecting theism without rejecting the dualism that underlies it just leaves the door open to more nonsense.

[ Edited: 25 June 2011 09:23 PM by Erik Davis ]
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Posted: 25 June 2011 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Occam. - 25 June 2011 12:46 PM

There’s no oxymoron here.  The beliefs one has based on humanism do tend to militate against theism, but ( and I can’t understand it) spirituality and theism aren’t necessarily connected.  I recall a Unitarian minister who stated she was a spiritual atheist.  And, quite a few years ago when I went to a Unitarian Annual General Assembly, there was a hall with quite a few display booths.  The American Humanist Assoc. and the Secular Humanists each had one, but there was also a booth for the Religious Humanists.

Occam

I agree with you, Occam, and I rather like the idea of a humanist celebrant, myself.  It would be better than a plain old boring judge, that is for sure.  It would give Xians something to talk about too.  LOL  Besides, I do not want a religious minister presiding over my funeral when I die and neither would may sons.  That is where a humanist celebrant comes in handy for a humanist funeral celebration.

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“Sometimes in order to see the light, you have to risk the dark.” ~ Iris Hineman (Lois Smith) The Minority Report

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Posted: 25 June 2011 10:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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PLaClair - 25 June 2011 08:19 PM
carsonallen - 25 June 2011 06:52 PM

@TromboneAndrew
Precisely, I guess that is why when people hear the word spiritual they could come to a conclusion that it is something immaterial. A better word is probably needed.

It hardly ever succeeds. Words evolve not by plan but by usage. Language is an immediate means of communication, by which I mean that people use words as they come to mind. Like it or not, this is the word we are going to have to use if we hope to communicate to maximum effectiveness. We just have to make clear that we are using it consistent with scientific naturalism.

I agree, PLaClair.  The one example I use for this idea it the word “gay”.  It use to mean happy, but now it has a whole other meaning because the Gay Community claimed the word somewhere along the eras between the Gay ‘90s and whenever they started using it.  So, yes, words take on meaning by how they are used.

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Mriana
“Sometimes in order to see the light, you have to risk the dark.” ~ Iris Hineman (Lois Smith) The Minority Report

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Posted: 26 June 2011 12:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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I have to admit that the terms spiritual and humanism are not automatically against each other.I don’t really go for it, but if some do that’s cool by me.The marriage thing is a good example,glad you brought it up;anyone can be married by anybody when you get down to it.

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