some qustions about the technology
Posted: 26 September 2011 12:11 AM   [ Ignore ]
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hello, everyone, i am new here, and ask some friends to help me :D

The more mass an object has the longer it takes to burn?

Doesn’t a mass that’s warmed up increase in energy? As in the temperature of the metal is a way to measure the energy of it, thus heat = energy?

Couldn’t we use metals as conductors of energy by heating one end and have the transfer of energy move through metals or materials that have a high heat resistence?

And if dense materials take longer to burn that less dense, then we have a long lasting energy TaylorMade R11 Driver

the object will give off a certain temperature and temperature = amount of energy being held in the object when the object increases in temperature

And what about using dense mass as in more weight per size for fuel, heat them up and the metal would soak in energy, heating at a low temperature as it starts to ‘warm’ up or takes in the energy from the heat and let’s it build up.

is there any one has idea about it,, could you please do me a favor, thank u

[ Edited: 04 October 2011 02:24 AM by Jasmine ]
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Posted: 26 September 2011 05:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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This is the principle of geothermal. It is also the principle behind homes that use mass to store/release energy for maintaining comfortable temperatures during day/night cycles. And of course it is why the temperature is generally nice along the west coast.

Did you have other ideas?

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Posted: 26 September 2011 08:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Jasmine - 26 September 2011 12:11 AM

the object will give off a certain temperature and temperature = amount of energy being held in the object when the object increases in temperature

While this statement is true, it is not the entire story. Remember the old saying “There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch”? That applies here, and to puppies as well, but I digress.

Basic thermodynamics tells us it always requires more energy input than you get out of a system. This is one of the few inviolable laws in physics. As traveler said, the system you proposed is the basis of geothermal energy, but even there we get losses while transporting energy. The reason geothermal works so well is the energy is already stored in the ground (when we are heating a building) so we do not need to manufacture the energy, we just need to expend a small amount of energy moving the heat into our homes or, for cooling, pumping it back underground where the materials outside the pipes transfer the heat away from our buildings.

It seems intuitive that larger, more massive, objects will burn longer than less massive objects, but this is not always true. More massive objects burn hotter, and often consume themselves more quickly than less massive objects. This is certainly true for stars, where Blue Giant stars extinguish themselves in a few tens of millions of years, while Red Dwarf stars can live for hundreds of billions of years. I realize this analogy does not apply to campfires vs. bonfires, or small metal bars compared to large metal bars, but it is something to think about. Do not always trust your intuition.

You’re doing some good thinking. Keep the questions coming. And welcome to the CFI forums.

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