Anwar al-Awlaki (1971 to 09/2011)
Posted: 04 October 2011 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Anwar al-Awlaki

“A relative of al-Awlaki said Friday that the cleric is not dead.

“Last year, Al-Awlaki’s father filed a lawsuit against Obama, then-CIA chief Panetta and then-Secretary of Defense Robert Gates to prevent the U.S. government from trying to target his son for assassination.

“A district court judge threw out the case in December, leaving open the question of whether the government has the right to kill Americans abroad without a trial.

“The American Civil Liberties Union said Friday that the killing was part of an American counterterrorism program that ‘violates both U.S. and international law.’”

“A statement from the Dar Al Hijrah Islamic Center in Falls Church, Virginia, said al-Awlaki was a peaceful man while he was imam there and turned militant only after returning to Yemen. The statement condemned his espousal of violence.”

CNN: U.S. officials warn of possible retaliation after al Qaeda cleric is killed

“Awlaki was born in New Mexico, while his father, from a prominent Yemeni family, was studying agriculture there on a scholarship. His family returned to Yemen in 1978 and Awlaki lived in the capital, Sana’a, until finishing his secondary education. He then returned to the US, where he attended colleges in Colorado and San Diego, gaining degrees in education. In 1993 he travelled to Afghanistan, then in the depths of the chaotic civil war between former mujahideen factions which had followed the withdrawal of Soviet forces.”

“... Awlaki became a personal mentor to a number of groups and individuals contemplating violence. One was Nidal Malik Hasan, the US army officer who is charged with killing 13 people and wounding 30 at Fort Hood, Texas, in November 2009. Another may have been Faisal Shahzad, a Pakistani-American who pleaded guilty to an attempt in May 2010 to detonate a car bomb in Times Square, New York, and was sentenced to a life term in prison.”

“In recent years, US officials have cited evidence that Awlaki had become personally involved in the planning of attacks on America – something that would help provide a legal justification for the controversial act of remote-controlled assassination.”

Guardian UK: Anwar al-Awlaki obituary

If a US citizen who preaches a “fire brand” sermon is justly assassination by drones, then what does that mean for the myriad of Protestant “fire brand” preachers, and the GOP propagandists like Rush Limbaugh, and Ann Coulter JD, etc.?  Those people also promote fights, war, assassination.  Obviously al-Awlaki had a change from a peaceful and just message while he lived in the USA, to a radical and violent one after he left, but I have to wonder why he changed?

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Posted: 05 October 2011 06:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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While your plaint will never get any political traction, I agree whole-heartedly with it. We live by the rule of law. I would be willing to see a special court set up for hearing such cases, in which the standards of evidence are not as strict as in domestic cases. But I would want the law establishing such a court to be carefully worked out so that it doesn’t permit irresponsible attacks. Right now, we simply have to assume that the people deciding whom to kill are good, proper, law-abiding folk who would never hurt a fly without solid reason.

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Posted: 06 October 2011 08:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Chris Crawford - 05 October 2011 06:28 PM

While your plaint will never get any political traction, I agree whole-heartedly with it. We live by the rule of law. I would be willing to see a special court set up for hearing such cases, in which the standards of evidence are not as strict as in domestic cases. But I would want the law establishing such a court to be carefully worked out so that it doesn’t permit irresponsible attacks. Right now, we simply have to assume that the people deciding whom to kill are good, proper, law-abiding folk who would never hurt a fly without solid reason.

I agree.  Where are the checks and balances to ensure freedom and justice.

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Posted: 06 October 2011 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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“Secret Panel may put Americans on ‘Kill List”’.....A secret panel of mid-level national security officials has been established that can put American citizens on a “kill or capture” list that is ultimately sent to the White House for final approval. http://www.military.com/news/article/secret-panel-may-put-americans-on-kill-list.html?ESRC=eb.nl

There were two American citizens killed it that drone attack. Samir ibn Zafar Khan and Anwar al-Awlaki. Were both on the ‘kill list’? I don’t know, haven’t seen a copy of it.

Even knowing that in November 2010, a Yemenite judge ordered that Anwar al-Awlaki be captured “dead or alive, for plotting to kill foreigners and being a member of al-Qaeda,he was given a trail in absentia. And that it was a CIA(not FBI or other Justice dept. agency), drone attack operation with the consent of Yemen authorities,(as usual, many drone attacks have been used in Yemen). Still, to me, this “death from above” is not justice in the eyes of US courts. What it is, death to members of al-Qaeda on foreign soil during war.

It’s more of a tactical operation on foreign soil in the war against terrorism. In this war, the battlefield is in many countries. There is so much secret information today I as a citizen can not judge if these drone attacks are right or wrong.

“I am proud be a traitor to America.” are the words of Samir Khan posted to “Inspire” magazine which is published by al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP). When is ones US citizenship revoked?

http://burnpit.legion.org/2011/10/predator-drones-and-due-process

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Posted: 06 October 2011 06:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Al-Awlaki was identified, but I question how?  If he was hit by missles, would you recognize the remains?  I think there are real questions about the military claims of this assassination. 

And what is the value of this man as a target?  He preached violence in English, as I understand.  We are supposed to be worried about Arab attackers in the “War on Terror” and as I so often do I find it makes little sense to assassinate a man who preached to an English audience, and likely inspired no-one.  When did he try to attack us?  It seems very convenient for the intelligence community that Bin Laden is assassinated and he probably never set foot in the USA, that al-Awlaki while in the USA didn’t attack, and that they get credit for protecting us, this is a success.  Whenever I hear of an Muslim attacker getting killed, stopped, or caught it seems to me that ordinary US citizens where the ones who caught the attacker or called the authorities.

I think that the neat and clean way that the journalists have swept away this story is all too convenient for Obama and we deserve to more facts about this assassination.  I think this story deserves much more air time.

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Posted: 07 October 2011 04:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Posted: 07 October 2011 06:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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GdB - 07 October 2011 04:38 AM

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Posted: 07 October 2011 08:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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jump_in_the_pit - 06 October 2011 06:33 PM

Al-Awlaki was identified, but I question how?  If he was hit by missles, would you recognize the remains?  I think there are real questions about the military claims of this assassination. 

probably used same or similar techniques used to identify the 9/11 and Branch Davidian of Waco victims.

And what is the value of this man as a target?  He preached violence in English, as I understand.  We are supposed to be worried about Arab attackers in the “War on Terror” and as I so often do I find it makes little sense to assassinate a man who preached to an English audience, and likely inspired no-one.  When did he try to attack us?

the target value, being one of Al-Qaeda leaders. You do know that Anwar al-Awlaki was a bilingual militant cleric working as a international militant recruiter having a high leadership position in Al-Qaeda, right?
And that Al-Qaeda is a global broad-based militant Islamist terrorist organization calling for global Jihad. And has been designated a terrorist organization by the U S, the U N Security Council, the E U, NATO, and other countries.
Anwar al-Awlaki inspired many. and some have carried out murder and attempted murder acts.

It seems very convenient for the intelligence community that Bin Laden is assassinated and he probably never set foot in the USA, that al-Awlaki while in the USA didn’t attack, and that they get credit for protecting us, this is a success.  Whenever I hear of an Muslim attacker getting killed, stopped, or caught it seems to me that ordinary US citizens where the ones who caught the attacker or called the authorities.I think that the neat and clean way that the journalists have swept away this story is all too convenient for Obama and we deserve to more facts about this assassination.  I think this story deserves much more air time.

Yes, a great success story for the books on fighting terrorist, I believe. The late bin Laden left behind resources that are leading our nation’s warrior’s to hunt down, capture or kill Al-Qaeda cowards such as al-Awlaki and others. And I support the troops and CIA in doing what they do.

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Posted: 07 October 2011 07:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Al-Awlaki is one of the prime instigators of the Fort Hood attack down here in Texas, and likely others. This guy wasn’t just some angry Muslim talking trash about the US. He was a high-ranking official in Al-Qaeda. His “preaching to an English audience” could likely be one of the contributing factors that lead people like Nidal Malik Hasan, Naser Abdo, and Rezwan Ferdaus (all US born citizens, ie., “English audiences”, as you put it) into extremism.

These are the type of people that insurgents like Al-Awlaki reach out to.

Saying that people like Rush Limbaugh and Ann Coulter are as dangerously influential as the likes of Al-Awlaki is taking it a bit too far, in my opinion.

[ Edited: 07 October 2011 07:47 PM by Cloak ]
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