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Good and Bad Foods
Posted: 29 November 2012 12:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Write4U - 24 October 2011 05:11 PM

One thing is clear, there are plants (foods) which are bad for you.  My question is if there are foods that are bad for you, are there foods which are particularly good for you, better than just healthy foods?

This question brings to mind, another.

It is clear that some bacteria are bad for us, but that there are some bacteria living inside of us that are beneficial.

What about viruses? Are there any that naturally have beneficial effects?

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Posted: 29 November 2012 03:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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TimB - 29 November 2012 12:51 PM
Write4U - 24 October 2011 05:11 PM

One thing is clear, there are plants (foods) which are bad for you.  My question is if there are foods that are bad for you, are there foods which are particularly good for you, better than just healthy foods?

This question brings to mind, another.

It is clear that some bacteria are bad for us, but that there are some bacteria living inside of us that are beneficial.

What about viruses? Are there any that naturally have beneficial effects?

That’s an excellent question, Tim. I don’t have much time today, but just a quick Google search turned out this (which doesn’t seem all that much):

It has been shown that many primary viral infections prevent superinfection caused by a homologous secondary virus. Interference between viruses occurs when infection by one virus results in the inhibition of replication of another virus. For example, hepatitis A virus infection suppresses hepatitis C virus replication, and may lead to recovery from hepatitis C virus.

HERE is the link.

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Posted: 29 November 2012 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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I can see why the presence of beneficial viruses could be difficult to detect.  You don’t generally go to the doctor and say, I’m feeling remarkably well today.  The link made reference to a study showing the cancer fighting efficacy of a certain virus, but I’m guessing that that would only be by medically and strategically introducing the virus, rather than by people naturally acquiring the virus.

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Posted: 29 November 2012 08:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Its actually an interesting question. Many viruses have incorporated themselves into our DNA and others live harmlessly ( as far as we know) within us. There is a lot we dont know about the bacterial flora that make up the ecosystem in and on our body. We know even less about the role of viruses and fungi.

Recently i heard a discussion about some research at MIT on a very broad spectrum ant viral agent that goes by the acronym DRACO (“Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) Activated Caspase Oligomerizer”). It works by attacking mammalian cells that contain dsRNA which is produced only in cells infected with a virus. Treatments for viral infections are very limited and most antivirus agents only work again a few related viruses so if this pans out it could be a real breakthrough but as with antibiotics, we may find that the use fo such agents may kill of viruses we never knew existed and whose importance we hadnt appreciated.

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Posted: 02 December 2012 12:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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While web-surfing the benficial virus topic, I came across an article that suggests that viruses may sometimes have played an instrumental role in our evolution.
http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/12/science/12paleo.html?pagewanted=all

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Posted: 02 December 2012 11:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Geez, I can see it now.  The present yogurt suppliers will soon start promoting virus infused milk puddings. smile

Occam

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Posted: 02 December 2012 01:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Occam. - 02 December 2012 11:43 AM

Geez, I can see it now.  The present yogurt suppliers will soon start promoting virus infused milk puddings. smile

Occam

Yes, on the premise that generations from now, your progeny may have enhanced genetic capabilities. (Probably not a good marketing technique, though, in a society that wants results immediately).

[ Edited: 02 December 2012 01:52 PM by TimB ]
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Posted: 09 April 2013 09:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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skin - 09 April 2013 05:30 AM

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are known as the “good fats” because they are good for your heart, your cholesterol, and your overall health.
Edited to remove spam link. Please avoid quoting spam links, since it just helps the spammers ...

SPAM Alert

[ Edited: 09 April 2013 11:46 AM by dougsmith ]
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