Survey: Parents think classic fairy tales are too scary for kids
Posted: 16 February 2012 11:58 AM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01

Trespassing, kidnapping, extortion — sounds like a meaty “Law and Order” episode, right?

Maybe, but I’m talking about fairy tales: “Goldilocks and the Three Bears,” “Little Red Riding Hood” and “Rumplestiltskin,” respectively. My older daughter is a high school freshman, but she still remembers being frightened by that granny-gobbling, Red-baiting wolf in the “Hood.”

Apparently, she’s not alone. The BBC reports that half of 2,000 parents surveyed thought classic fairy tales were too scary for preschoolers. After all, they don’t call ‘em Grimm for nothing. Moms seem to be particularly expendable, with Snow White and Cinderella among the best-known motherless daughters.

This is rich. I sure wish they would have mentioned a few of the scary children’s stories from that other book of fairy tales known as the Holy Bible.


Full story: Survey: Parents think classic fairy tales are too scary for kids

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 12:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4071
Joined  2006-11-28

My daughter and I used to read Grimm’s. Not only wasn’t it scary, it was funny in the way a cheesy, predictable horror movie series is. And we still joke about the fact that she couldn’t be a “ral Princess” because real princesses never have two parents!

 Signature 

The SkeptVet
The SkeptVet Blog
Militant Agnostic: I don’t know, and neither do you!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15354
Joined  2006-02-14
mckenzievmd - 16 February 2012 12:28 PM

My daughter and I used to read Grimm’s.

Was it an expurgated version? IIRC most versions published nowadays are pretty heavily edited to remove the ‘grimmest’ elements ...

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 12:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29

Yes, they are scary, although “scary” here is relative. I have very fond memories from my childhood when during our summer vacations at my grandparents’ house at night we would, with my siblings and my cousins, all hide under a two-ton feather duvet and had our grandfather read to us Grimms’ (and Hans Christian Andersen’s, and others’) fairy tales. We all loved it. We didn’t think they were that scary back then, but when I look at them now (I got Grimms’ and Andersen’s books for my kids) they are certainly scarier than any other recent fairy tales.

BTW, our grandfather read them to us in German, which is scary on its own.  grin  Also, it is worth noting that the original versions of the fairy tales don’t always end happily. The original “Little Mermaid” (who was actually a river water nymph, not a sea mermaid), for example, dies at the end. And if you never heard it, check out this beautiful excerpt from Dvořák’s Rusalka (“The water nymph”, a.k.a. “Little Mermaid”) “Song to the Moon.” The rest of the opera is not that good.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 02:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29

Now that I think about it, we actually grew up surrounded by all kinds of mythological creatures, like different types of evil nymphs (we had a night nymph, for example, who would take us away if we didn’t show up home before the dusk) or Hastrman who would drown us and take our souls if we played on the lake by ourselves, and many others. We found them scary enough to believe in these myths when we were younger but eventually let go of them as we grew older. The “indoctrination” only worked on us temporarily, but I guess it served its purpose for a while.

Here is a picture of Hastrman (he could stay above water as long as his coat was wet):

or54jq.jpg

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 02:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2647
Joined  2011-04-24

When I was a kid, I never read or cared about fairy tales; I had this thing called TV. grin  To be serious, that is absurd - the wimpification some adults try to put their children through is shocking.

 Signature 

Raise your glass if you’re wrong…. in all the right ways.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2647
Joined  2011-04-24
George - 16 February 2012 02:13 PM

Now that I think about it, we actually grew up surrounded by all kinds of mythological creatures, like different types of evil nymphs (we had a night nymph, for example, who would take us away if we didn’t show up home before the dusk) or Hastrman who would drown us and take our souls if we played on the lake by ourselves, and many others. We found them scary enough to believe in these myths when we were younger but eventually let go of them as we grew older. The “indoctrination” only worked on us temporarily, but I guess it served its purpose for a while.

Here is a picture of Hastrman (he could stay above water as long as his coat was wet):

or54jq.jpg

Cool looking pic. What does “Hastrman” mean?

 Signature 

Raise your glass if you’re wrong…. in all the right ways.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 02:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29

I think it comes from the German “wassermann” the “water man.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 February 2012 05:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Moderator
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5550
Joined  2010-06-16

As I’ve mentioned before, my mother used to read me fairytales when I was three and four.  I sat on her lap and she showed me the words which taught me to read.  She always stressed that the stories weren’t real so I never felt frightened.  I loved those many fairytales, and my understanding that they were enjoyable fiction really prepared me when my aunt gave me a child’s bible for my seventh birthday - just one more great set of fairytales.  LOL

Occam

 Signature 

Succinctness, clarity’s core.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 February 2012 11:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1755
Joined  2007-10-22

I learned to read from comic books.  GI Joe Batman; Superman, etc. were the “fairy tales” invloved. grin

 Signature 

Gary the Human

All the Gods and all religions are created by humans, to meet human needs and accomplish human ends.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 February 2012 04:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Moderator
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5550
Joined  2010-06-16

They were a big part of my early reading, too.  As my father said when my aunt tried to chew him out, “I don’t care what my son reads, as long as he reads.”

Occam

 Signature 

Succinctness, clarity’s core.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 February 2012 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  776
Joined  2009-07-17
Occam. - 17 February 2012 04:48 PM

“I don’t care what my son reads, as long as he reads.”

That’s exactly my attitude with my children. wink

Take care,

Derek

 Signature 

“It is noble to be good; it is still nobler to teach others to be good—and less trouble.”—Mark Twain

Profile