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Why does society seem so complicit in the sexualization of little girls for money in preadolescent beauty contests?
Posted: 19 February 2012 05:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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George - 19 February 2012 06:57 AM

So they have “Juicy” written on their butts. So what? I have seen little boys who had “#1 race car driver” written on their chests. I think it’s cute and funny.

George, I don’t know how familiar you are with American slang, but juicy means f***able.  Even though the girls are unaware of the nuance, it seems creepy for parents to buy that clothing for their children.

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Posted: 19 February 2012 06:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Is that what it means? I didn’t know. In that case, it’s disgusting but harmless nevertheless.

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Posted: 19 February 2012 06:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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As far as the “juicy” logo goes don’t discount the fads that many parents have to face with their teenage kids. I’m sure you have heard the argument ” well, he/she has one why can’t I wear the same thing?” response: “because I said so and you’ ll look like a slut/thug and Your Mom and I won’t have you going out of the house looking like that, end of argument”. Or (helicopter parent response) I guess it’s ok and we wouldn’t want you to be singled out so have you some ” juicy” on those shorts. Either way, it’s ultimately the parents call to rise or fall to fashion and popularity. Remember high school people. Unless you were homeschooled surely you remember the clique behavior.


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Posted: 19 February 2012 07:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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George - 19 February 2012 06:17 PM

Is that what it means? I didn’t know. In that case, it’s disgusting but harmless nevertheless.

Is it harmless? If so, at what point do we find exposing children to sexually provocative clothing wrong?

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Posted: 20 February 2012 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Little girls get entered in beauty contests for exactly the same reason that little boys get pushed, often unwillingly, into competetive sports; parents want their kids to “win” so they can boast to other parents, “My son’s quarterback for the school football team, might get picked for the County”, or “My daughter’s won three local beauty contests, she’s entering the State competition next year.”

And then, of course, you get indignant parents screaming at judges and coaches; “My Brenda’s much prettier than that Bodnarchuk girl, how come SHE gets First and Brenda didn’t even place? Are you blind?” - or “My Geoff’s a waaaay better player than him, how come he gets picked for the team and not Geoff? Are you stupid or what ?”

And then, naturally, they scream at the kids; “You didn’t try hard enough!!”, “How come you muffed that catch??”

So it’s all down to parents with inferiority complexes trying to live vicariously through their children. It’s all so, so predictable; and so unutterably sad when some poor little lass gets pushed into posing near-nude for beauty contests when she’d much prefer to be looking at pond life through a microscope, or reading Shelley…....

Theflyingsorcerer.

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Posted: 20 February 2012 07:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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TFS,

An excellent analysis!!!!!

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Posted: 21 February 2012 08:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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So it’s all down to parents with inferiority complexes trying to live vicariously through their children. It’s all so, so predictable; and so unutterably sad when some poor little lass gets pushed into posing near-nude for beauty contests when she’d much prefer to be looking at pond life through a microscope, or reading Shelley

I totally agree with TFS (see post #7). Parents objectify their kids, boys and girls to become cheerleaders or football stars and often treat them like trained ponies instead of developing their minds. In reality very few football players make it on to a college team and few of those go on to the pros. Same with girls. their chances of landing that acting job are next to nil, but still the parents persist. Try as we might we can’t make our children into superstars; they have to do it themselves. Personally, I’d rather see a kid hungry for knowledge; looking for pond life through a microscope is FAR more exciting than struttin’ your stuff on a stage.


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Posted: 21 February 2012 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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I hear about parents pushing their kids into doing things all the time, but I have yet to see such family for myself. My kids (and those of my friends) are like little chupacabras sucking the last bit of energy out of us, demanding we take them to sport practices three times a week, or a bookstore at nine o’clock in the evening because they just finished their book and have to have the following one in the series. Sometimes I wish my kids were just a bit more of couch potatoes. I am tired…

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Posted: 21 February 2012 08:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Theflyingsorcerer - 20 February 2012 06:26 PM

Little girls get entered in beauty contests for exactly the same reason that little boys get pushed, often unwillingly, into competetive sports; parents want their kids to “win” so they can boast to other parents, “My son’s quarterback for the school football team, might get picked for the County”, or “My daughter’s won three local beauty contests, she’s entering the State competition next year.”

And then, of course, you get indignant parents screaming at judges and coaches; “My Brenda’s much prettier than that Bodnarchuk girl, how come SHE gets First and Brenda didn’t even place? Are you blind?” - or “My Geoff’s a waaaay better player than him, how come he gets picked for the team and not Geoff? Are you stupid or what ?”

And then, naturally, they scream at the kids; “You didn’t try hard enough!!”, “How come you muffed that catch??”

So it’s all down to parents with inferiority complexes trying to live vicariously through their children. It’s all so, so predictable; and so unutterably sad when some poor little lass gets pushed into posing near-nude for beauty contests when she’d much prefer to be looking at pond life through a microscope, or reading Shelley…....

Theflyingsorcerer.

Sorcerer, how dare you assume that a girl would rather read Shelley and study pond scum then pose near nude! tongue wink

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Posted: 21 February 2012 08:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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George - 21 February 2012 08:13 AM

I hear about parents pushing their kids into doing things all the time, but I have yet to see such family for myself. My kids (and those of my friends) are like little chupacabras sucking the last bit of energy out of us, demanding we take them to sport practices three times a week, or a bookstore at nine o’clock in the evening because they just finished their book and have to have the following one in the series. Sometimes I wish my kids were just a bit more of couch potatoes. I am tired…

Don’t let them push you around.

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Posted: 21 February 2012 08:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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I hear about parents pushing their kids into doing things all the time, but I have yet to see such family for myself. My kids (and those of my friends) are like little chupacabras sucking the last bit of energy out of us, demanding we take them to sport practices three times a week, or a bookstore at nine o’clock in the evening because they just finished their book and have to have the following one in the series. Sometimes I wish my kids were just a bit more of couch potatoes. I am tired


One word George, KINDLE. Downloading books from the confort of your couch….potatoes!! cheese

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Posted: 21 February 2012 09:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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They don’t like ebooks. Neither do I nor my wife. Must be genetic.  grin

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Posted: 21 February 2012 09:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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mid atlantic - 21 February 2012 08:36 AM

Don’t let them push you around.

Just wait until you become a dad yourself. I seldom know how to say no to my kids.

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Posted: 21 February 2012 04:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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mid atlantic - 21 February 2012 08:35 AM
Theflyingsorcerer - 20 February 2012 06:26 PM

Little girls get entered in beauty contests for exactly the same reason that little boys get pushed, often unwillingly, into competetive sports; parents want their kids to “win” so they can boast to other parents, “My son’s quarterback for the school football team, might get picked for the County”, or “My daughter’s won three local beauty contests, she’s entering the State competition next year.”

And then, of course, you get indignant parents screaming at judges and coaches; “My Brenda’s much prettier than that Bodnarchuk girl, how come SHE gets First and Brenda didn’t even place? Are you blind?” - or “My Geoff’s a waaaay better player than him, how come he gets picked for the team and not Geoff? Are you stupid or what ?”

And then, naturally, they scream at the kids; “You didn’t try hard enough!!”, “How come you muffed that catch??”

So it’s all down to parents with inferiority complexes trying to live vicariously through their children. It’s all so, so predictable; and so unutterably sad when some poor little lass gets pushed into posing near-nude for beauty contests when she’d much prefer to be looking at pond life through a microscope, or reading Shelley…....

Theflyingsorcerer.

Sorcerer, how dare you assume that a girl would rather read Shelley and study pond scum then pose near nude! tongue wink


I’m assuming nothing. Maybe some little girls enjoy posing in bikinis; if so, more power to them (and if your daughter is one, don’t bother buying her a microscope).

When I was at school I was forced to play football (soccer) and cricket (this was in 1950s Britain) when I would have much preferred microscopes or Meccano. Or archery or fencing, but we never did interesting stuff like that.

Incidentally cricket has to be the most yawningly boring game ever invented, unless you’re a hotshot bowler or batsman. You spend half the afternoon standing out on the field waiting for a ball to come your way, and the other half sitting in the pavilion waiting to go out to bat. And this is supposed to be exercise???

But I digress. Not all kids have that competitive urge, but it seems far too many parents do.

Theflyingsorcerer.

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Posted: 21 February 2012 04:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Theflyingsorcerer - 21 February 2012 04:11 PM
mid atlantic - 21 February 2012 08:35 AM
Theflyingsorcerer - 20 February 2012 06:26 PM

Little girls get entered in beauty contests for exactly the same reason that little boys get pushed, often unwillingly, into competetive sports; parents want their kids to “win” so they can boast to other parents, “My son’s quarterback for the school football team, might get picked for the County”, or “My daughter’s won three local beauty contests, she’s entering the State competition next year.”

And then, of course, you get indignant parents screaming at judges and coaches; “My Brenda’s much prettier than that Bodnarchuk girl, how come SHE gets First and Brenda didn’t even place? Are you blind?” - or “My Geoff’s a waaaay better player than him, how come he gets picked for the team and not Geoff? Are you stupid or what ?”

And then, naturally, they scream at the kids; “You didn’t try hard enough!!”, “How come you muffed that catch??”

So it’s all down to parents with inferiority complexes trying to live vicariously through their children. It’s all so, so predictable; and so unutterably sad when some poor little lass gets pushed into posing near-nude for beauty contests when she’d much prefer to be looking at pond life through a microscope, or reading Shelley…....

Theflyingsorcerer.

Sorcerer, how dare you assume that a girl would rather read Shelley and study pond scum then pose near nude! tongue wink


I’m assuming nothing. Maybe some little girls enjoy posing in bikinis; if so, more power to them (and if your daughter is one, don’t bother buying her a microscope).

When I was at school I was forced to play football (soccer) and cricket (this was in 1950s Britain) when I would have much preferred microscopes or Meccano. Or archery or fencing, but we never did interesting stuff like that.

Incidentally cricket has to be the most yawningly boring game ever invented, unless you’re a hotshot bowler or batsman. You spend half the afternoon standing out on the field waiting for a ball to come your way, and the other half sitting in the pavilion waiting to go out to bat. And this is supposed to be exercise???

But I digress. Not all kids have that competitive urge, but it seems far too many parents do.

Theflyingsorcerer.

I’ve never played cricket, but it does sound quite boring.

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