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The Role of Ofsted   Part Two
Posted: 18 March 2012 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Bilingualism can help pupils’ all-round education and should be encouraged. Children who know an “eastern” as well as a “western” language are more academically able than others. With the pace at which the world interacts today, multi-lingualism is a step forward. Almost all recent research literature agrees that if you want children whose home language is not English to excel in English –medium schools, it is important to nurture and acknowledge that first language alongside their English development. Cultivating bilingualism could and should promote pupil’s linguistic development. Muslim community feels that state schools with non-Muslim monolingual teachers are not suitable for bilingual Muslim children. The number of Muslim schools is on the increase and I believe that by 2020 there will be more than 500 Muslim schools. Muslim schools give young children self-confidence and self-esteem in who they are and an understanding of Islamic teaching of tolerance and respect which prepares them for a positive and fulfilling role in society. There are hundreds of state schools where Muslim children are in majority. In my opinion, all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies. Muslim schools protect Muslim children from the onslaught of Euro-centrism, homosexuality, racism, binge drinking, drug addiction, incivility, anti-social behavior, teenage pregnancies and abortions and secular traditions. Muslim schools made pupils aware of their future role as proactive British Muslims and left them well prepared for life in a multicultural society. Under British education system, Muslim children will distance themselves from their culture, languages and faith. There is nothing left but their beautiful Muslim names.

English is one of the most damaging subject, reflects secular and immoral beliefs that contradict the viewpoint of Islam. Romeo and Juliet of Shakespare advocates disobeying parents and premarital relations. Most people know English as a language, perhaps as a global language. Speaking English does not promote integration into British, American and Australian societies, and broaden opportunities. English speaking Muslim youths are angry, frustrated and extremist, thanks to English language. English language is not only a lingua franca but also lingua frankensteinia. Human right is also covers linguistic right. Cultural and linguistic genocide are very common. English is today the world killer language. Linguistic genocide is a crime against humanity and British schooling is guilty of committing this crime.

Official figures show that almost one million pupils speak English as a second language but British schooling has been accused of making them notoriously monolingual Brits. The teachers even discourage children to speak their languages at schools. The teachers do not teach them Standard English. The children learn local English accent in playground and in street. British schooling is also responsible for turning away bilingual migrant children from their mother tongues. It does not encourage or provide facilities for the teaching and learning of their languages. There is a positive co-relation between British schooling and Aborigines Protection Act. It enabled to remove children from their parents and to place them in institutions so that they could forget their cultural roots and languages. British schooling has been anglocising Muslim children and they find themselves cut off from their cultural heritage and languages. Teaching profession does not like Muslim children attending Masajid in the evening or at weekends to learn the Holy Quran, Arabic, Urdu and other community languages. Even full time Muslim schools have been classified as “Osama bin Laden Academies” by Nasuwt Teaching Union. Majority of anti-Muslim stories are not about terrorism but about Muslim culture—the hijab, Muslim schools, family life and religiosity. Muslims in the west ought to be recognised as a western community, not as an alien culture.

The present structure of OFSTED is not in a position to inspect Muslim schools properly. There is a dire need for bilingual Muslim Inspectors. Non-Muslim monolingual Inspectors are not in a position to inspect Muslim schools with bilingual Muslim children. OFSTED should employ bilingual Muslim inspectors for the inspection who should not only be well versed in English, Arabic, Urdu and other community languages but also in sciences and humanities. Muslim girl schools should be inspected by Muslim ladies inspectors. They must make sure that Bilingual Muslims children have a right, to be taught their culture, languages and faith alongside a mainstream curriculum.

Bilingual Muslim children need to learn and be well versed in Standard English to follow the National Curriculum and go for higher studies and research to serve humanity. The problem is that they learn English in the streets and in the playgrounds. British schooling does not teach English to migrant children. The teachers let them speak the same accent in the classroom. They have no courage to stop them or correct them. This is one of the main reasons why one third of children have difficulties with reading when they leave primary schools. Majority of such children are bilingual Muslims. They often speak “street” with its own grammar, vocabulary and pronunciation. In other European countries and in the sub-continent argot and slang are not allowed into the classrooms. In Britain primary school teachers do not feel that it’s role to interfere with self-expression in any shape or form. They encourage children to read poems and stories written in ethnic dialects. Bilingual Muslim teachers are in a better position to teach English to their children.
Iftikhar Ahmad

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Posted: 19 March 2012 04:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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There is an English saying: “When in Rome, do as the Romans do”. 
Instead of complaining about the shortcomings of British schooling as it pertains to Muslim teachings, I would suggest that you keep your Muslim teaching in the home and have your Muslim children learn to speak and function in an English speaking secular society. You cannot demand that the society make adjustments for your shortcomings.

I emigrated to Canada when I was 17 and learned English by reading the English dictionary and attending English classes. The burden to make an effort to integrate falls on the immigrant.

But to accuse the educational system of your host country of failing to address your “special” needs is disrespectful. Look back to where you came from and try to imagine an English christian demanding that your country of birth would accommodate his/her demands for what you are demanding now.

Moreover, you are free to practice your religion, but you are not allowed to bring your religion to a secular school. Apparently you do not understand the concept of seperation of church and state. In a secular society where all religions are respected equally, no one religion can claim special status and accommodation.

IMO, with your demands you are trying to introduce theocracy, and we know all to well what that leads to, repression of individual freedom.

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Posted: 20 March 2012 03:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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New Study Finds That Bilingual Immigrants Are Healthier

Bilingual immigrants are healthier than immigrants who speak only one language, according to new research from sociologists at Rice University.

The study, which appears in the March issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior, found that people with strong English and native language proficiencies report better physical and mental health than unilingual immigrants.

“Our research suggests that English proficiency gained at the expense of native-language fluency may not be beneficial for overall health status,” said Rice alumna and Stanford University graduate student Ariela Schachter, who co-authored the research paper with Rice sociology professors Bridget Gorman and Rachel Tolbert Kimbro. “It’s very important for the immigrants to hold on to their native language in addition to learning English.”

The study examined associations between English and native-language proficiency and usage and self-rated health for more than 4,649 U.S. immigrants from China, the Philippines, Vietnam, Mexico, Cuba and Puerto Rico.

The research showed that the favorable health reported by bilingual immigrants is not impacted by factors such as socioeconomic status, acculturation, family and social support, stress and discrimination and health behaviors. The researchers theorize that the health benefits may be the result of a kind of “cultural flexibility” that allows them to easily integrate with their surroundings while maintaining cultural ties.

“Individuals who maintain native-language fluency while also learning English may be better equipped to retain relationships in their countries of origin and form new ones in the U.S.,” Gorman said. “We believe this can help explain the positive relationship between bilingualism and self-rated health.”

“There are still big questions about why bilingual immigrants are healthier than their unilingual counterparts,” Kimbro said. “We hope our findings will encourage further research of the subject.”
IA

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Posted: 20 March 2012 03:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Immigrants who learn how to speak new lenguage and remain fluent in their native lenguage are probably more intelligent. And intelligence correlates with health. If you wish your children to become healthier (and more intelligent) stop marrying your cousins.

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Posted: 20 March 2012 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Ifti,
immigrants from China, the Philippines, Vietnam, Mexico, Cuba and Puerto Rico

it is important to nurture and acknowledge that first language alongside their English development

Where are you going with this?  I can add another 50 countries represented in the US culture.
You are citing a US study to somehow support the claims you made in earlier posts in regards to England. But in the US we make no special effort to keep all those native languages. If an immigrant (from any country) wants to be successful in either country, he/she better learn to speak English. The same holds true for immigrants into any country. You will do better if you learn to speak the language of that country.

But you cannot expect any country to make “special accommodations” for every immigrant that comes across its borders. In any country there are plenty of private teachers or local organizations or colleges that offer bi-lingual courses. In fact, in a mutli-cultural country it is wholly impractical to expect the government to interfere in any way except to encourage learning the ‘official language”. But the choice to keep your native language or learn any language in addition to learning English is yours alone.

[ Edited: 20 March 2012 05:19 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 20 March 2012 05:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Immigrants who learn how to speak new lenguage and remain fluent in their native lenguage are probably more intelligent. And intelligence correlates with health. If you wish your children to become healthier (and more intelligent) stop marrying your cousins.

George, you absolutely crack me up! That is exactly what everyone here accuses we Appalachians of, going to family reunions to pick up girls! BTW I agree completely that we unilinguals are missing out by not learning another language even though we can live in this culture without one, and that anyone who immigrates or emigrates needs to earn to communicate well in the host country in which they find themselves. One of our exchange students from Sweden had his father over for a visit once and I had the pleasure of meeting and talking at length with him. He owned a telecommunications company and spoke 7 languages fluently, one of them Hebrew. It’s imperative to learn the subtleties of the language and the younger you are the easier it is to learn to convey a complete thought. It seems that English is one of the hardest to master because of varied word meanings and our diverse dialects. Did you or Write find it difficult?


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Posted: 20 March 2012 06:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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When I compare English to the other lenguages I know, I think it’s actually a very easy lenguage to learn. Except for the spelling, which is simply nuts.

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Posted: 20 March 2012 06:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Yes, I imagine the spelling would drive you to distraction. There was a concerted effort early on to break away from the Mother tongue and spell words phonetically. Even Franklin proposed that, and some Americanized spellings vary from the original, ex. Labor v. Labour. So, which language did you find the hardest to learn?


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Posted: 20 March 2012 06:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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In HS (Holland) we learned the rudimentaries of 3 languages (English, French, German), in addition to “Dutch”. They were mandatory .
I came to the US via Canada, where I lived with an English family, so I was forced to learn English.  The first thing I did was to get a Dutch-English dictionary and look up every word that was unfamiliar. It took about 1 year to become practically fluent, but I have always made it a point to have a dictionary and thesaurus handy. Fortunately I love reading about nature and sci-fi and that in turn introduced me to science in general. TG for the internet…:)
But my writing skills are better than my ad lib speaking. It allows me to edit when trying to address a complicated subject.

IMO, Dutch is one of the most difficult languages to learn, it has almost no consistency.

[ Edited: 20 March 2012 06:55 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 20 March 2012 07:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 20 March 2012 06:37 PM

Yes, I imagine the spelling would drive you to distraction. There was a concerted effort early on to break away from the Mother tongue and spell words phonetically. Even Franklin proposed that, and some Americanized spellings vary from the original, ex. Labor v. Labour. So, which language did you find the hardest to learn?


Cap’t Jack

The most difficult lenguages for me were Russian (because I didn’t like it) and Latin (because it’s, well, a difficult lenguage). But I have forgotten most of both by now anyway. I can understand German pretty well, but I have much harder time speaking it; although I was fluent in it as a child. Spanish came easy to me because I was young when I learned it and I’ve never stopped speaking it. English was a bit harder for me when I compare it with Spanish, but that’s because I was much older when I began to speak it and also the pronunciation never came easy to me. I still have (and always will have) a heavy accent.

[ Edited: 20 March 2012 07:14 PM by George ]
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Posted: 21 March 2012 04:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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The most difficult lenguages for me were Russian (because I didn’t like it) and Latin (because it’s, well, a difficult lenguage). But I have forgotten most of both by now anyway. I can understand German pretty well, but I have much harder time speaking it; although I was fluent in it as a child. Spanish came easy to me because I was young when I learned it and I’ve never stopped speaking it. English was a bit harder for me when I compare it with Spanish, but that’s because I was much older when I began to speak it and also the pronunciation never came easy to me. I still have (and always will have) a heavy accent

I’ve noticed this from exposure to many immigrants over the years, namely that their accent remains that of the parent language IF they learned it beyond puberty. I used to live in South Bend, In. and worked with recent imigrants from Southern Italy one of whom (my age 18) who spoke no English. As we worked together in a towel plant he taught me Italian while learning English from me. It was a fantastic exercise in language aquisition! His cousins who had come here a few years before him as children spoke English with no Italian undertones. Our Ass’t principal is from India, by way of South Africa and she still retains her Indian accent. Hindi was her mother tongue. I would imagine Russian to be the hardest to learn if you’re English because there are no bridges between the languages. German is much easier because it’s our base language. One could even pick out a few Dutch words. I know this is off track but language study is fascinating. someday some linguist will track down the parent of all of them!

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Posted: 21 March 2012 05:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Yeah, I guess age has a lot to do with the accent. The English accent (and especially the North American English) must be the hardest one to master. But then, I can easily switch from European Spanish to, say, Argentinean one, and do it so well that even a native Argentinean will have a hard time recognizing that I am not an Argentinean. And I have never even been to Argentina. But American/Canadian accent is difficult for me. No idea why that is.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 06:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Posted: 21 March 2012 07:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Yeah, I guess age has a lot to do with the accent. The English accent (and especially the North American English) must be the hardest one to master. But then, I can easily switch from European Spanish to, say, Argentinean one, and do it so well that even a native Argentinean will have a hard time recognizing that I am not an Argentinean. And I have never even been to Argentina. But American/Canadian accent is difficult for me. No idea why that is.

You mentioned an Argentinian accent but do the Argintines have different definitions for words from the parent Spanish? Ex. French Canadians, whom I sure you are familiar with have different word equivalents for some traditional French words. I guess you could call it slang although the dialect sounds the same as continental French. And the problem you have with American /Canadian might be your slavic tongue getting in the way! People from our area sometimes hire language coaches to rid themselves of their Appalachian accent, and even then it peeks through (ex. Ashley Judd).


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Posted: 21 March 2012 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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My French is horrible, so I am not sure how it compares to Canadian vs. France’s French. An Argentinean’s vocabulary is, for example, a lot smaller than that of a Spaniard. My estimate would be that an Argentinean uses about two thirds of the words found in the Castilian language. (A person in Central America uses even less). The Argentinean Spanish has been also heavily influenced by Italian, but they haven’t really adopted any Italian words as much as they bastardized Spanish words with Italian.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 08:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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George - 21 March 2012 08:16 AM

An Argentinean’s vocabulary is, for example, a lot smaller than that of a Spaniard.

Based on what evidence?

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