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The Role of Ofsted   Part Two
Posted: 21 March 2012 02:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Speaking of hobbies, Why is it so rare to hear anyone asking you in Canada (U.S.?) what your hobby is? In Europe, it will be one of the first things people try to find out about each other. Do people here think it may be too personal and therefore impolite to ask such question? What is it like in the U.K. (the missing link between here and Europe.  grin )?

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Posted: 21 March 2012 02:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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I copied this from another site, and it seems reasonable to me.

Trading languages have bigger vocabularies than insular languages. English is a good example of a trading language. It is basically Anglo-Saxon in grammar and vocabulary, but has absorbed over half its vocabulary via Latin based languages (such as Latin itself, French, Italian and Spanish). Through its mercantile and eventual colonial links, it has absorbed vocabulary from all over the world. I would hazard a guess that English would have one of the largest, if not the largest vocabulary, as it has never had a central body regulating its vocabulary (as has had French).
ANother language with an enormous vocabulary is Malay/Indonesian. Like English, it was a trading language, used , in medieval times, from Indonesia to China, and to the Middle East. It is basically an Austronesian language, but, because of the religous and cultural history of the islands, has absorbed large amounts of vocabulary from Sanskrit, Tamil, ARabic/Persian, Dutch, and English. Because of the hundreds of regional languages in the islands, Indonesian has also absorbed regional vocabulary.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 03:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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I have also heard that Spanish has actually the largest vocabulary of all the romantic languages. IIRC, French was second, followed by Portuguese, then Romanian and Latin at the end; I don’t remember where Italian fit.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 03:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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George - 21 March 2012 02:39 PM

Speaking of hobbies, Why is it so rare to hear anyone asking you in Canada (U.S.?) what your hobby is? In Europe, it will be one of the first things people try to find out about each other. Do people here think it may be too personal and therefore impolite to ask such question? What is it like in the U.K. (the missing link between here and Europe.  grin )?

  In the US, I think most people will ask what you do for a living - probably because people want to know how much money everybody makes. LOL

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Posted: 21 March 2012 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Yeah, in Europe they simply ask you how much you make. I am not making it up.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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In Spain the first question they tend to ask is who your family is, and where you are from. (In Spain). I think there you are who your family is, and work is considered more of a necessary evil than something that defines oneself. I’ve never heard anyone there ask how much one makes—that would be considered extraordinarily rude.

But it doesn’t surprise me that nobody tends to ask about hobbies. (I’ve never heard anyone ask in Spain, either). I think most people consider hobbies to be essentially trivial and hence not relevant to one’s identity. (E.g., “Get a hobby!”) I’d tend to disagree with that assessment, but then I’m a bit unusual.

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Posted: 21 March 2012 04:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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In Spain the first question they tend to ask is who your family is, and where you are from. (In Spain). I think there you are who your family is, and work is considered more of a necessary evil than something that defines oneself. I’ve never heard anyone there ask how much one makes—that would be considered extraordinarily rude.

But it doesn’t surprise me that nobody tends to ask about hobbies. (I’ve never heard anyone ask in Spain, either). I think most people consider hobbies to be essentially trivial and hence not relevant to one’s identity. (E.g., “Get a hobby!”) I’d tend to disagree with that assessment, but then I’m a bit unusual.

 

Strange. It’s exactly the same here in our area. We know one another by families. for instance, I can pretty much tell where a person came from by their last name linking them to a particular local family. Our area was settled relatively late in the 19th Century with a few core families. Even later arrivals added their non Anglo-Saxon names to the mix, ex. Rahall which I think is Syrian. Most however are scots-Irish, German and French. BTW hobbies are an important way to relax from the stress we all experience, even if you like your job! I have several and plan to enjoy them more when I finally do hang up my spurs.


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