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debt collection at the hospital?
Posted: 27 April 2012 11:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Hmmm, even if the health care bills are able to be instituted, how will the fact that many hospitals are adjuncts of religious institutions affect their behavior? 

I suppose the government could decide that payment of anything to those hospitals would be preferential treatment to the involved religuous sect so they could refuse to include them in the health care.  LOL

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Posted: 01 May 2012 10:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I’ll add my own little story to this mess. I work for a global Fortune 250 company, well over 60k employees. I like most have one of the insurance plans, one incidently that HR subtley implies “is the what most people choose”.  Insurance company is top-tier, like Cigna, Humana, etc.  So my situation is supposed to be the “model” that Obama’s healthcare law (and the Republican model it’s based off of) promotes.  You’d think therefore my having this insurance is a good thing. Far from it.  Unless you want to pay close to $1000/month to get a low deductible, the standard deductibles are around $5000!!  That means you pay around $500/mo for absolutely no medical coverage until your bills go over $5000.  So you essentially double pay.  And then we had to bring my daughter to the emergency room.  She was there 3 hours, turned out to have sort of a standard medical issue curable with ordinary meds. Pricetage? Over $7000!  My point is, if there’s anyone out there who thinks somehow Obama’s plan is good, don’t.  You’re being sold a line.

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Posted: 01 May 2012 11:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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CuthbertJ - 01 May 2012 10:47 AM

I’ll add my own little story to this mess. I work for a global Fortune 250 company, well over 60k employees. I like most have one of the insurance plans, one incidently that HR subtley implies “is the what most people choose”.  Insurance company is top-tier, like Cigna, Humana, etc.  So my situation is supposed to be the “model” that Obama’s healthcare law (and the Republican model it’s based off of) promotes.  You’d think therefore my having this insurance is a good thing. Far from it.  Unless you want to pay close to $1000/month to get a low deductible, the standard deductibles are around $5000!!  That means you pay around $500/mo for absolutely no medical coverage until your bills go over $5000.  So you essentially double pay.  And then we had to bring my daughter to the emergency room.  She was there 3 hours, turned out to have sort of a standard medical issue curable with ordinary meds. Pricetage? Over $7000!  My point is, if there’s anyone out there who thinks somehow Obama’s plan is good, don’t.  You’re being sold a line.

That’s ridiculous. The Congressional Budget Office found that health insurance reform will reduce the deficit by $210 billion in this decade and by more than $1 trillion over the following 10 years. And a family of four would save as much as $2,300 on their premiums in 2014 compared to what they would have paid without reform.

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Posted: 01 May 2012 11:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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CuthbertJ - 01 May 2012 10:47 AM

I’ll add my own little story to this mess. I work for a global Fortune 250 company, well over 60k employees. I like most have one of the insurance plans, one incidently that HR subtley implies “is the what most people choose”.  Insurance company is top-tier, like Cigna, Humana, etc.  So my situation is supposed to be the “model” that Obama’s healthcare law (and the Republican model it’s based off of) promotes.  You’d think therefore my having this insurance is a good thing. Far from it.  Unless you want to pay close to $1000/month to get a low deductible, the standard deductibles are around $5000!!  That means you pay around $500/mo for absolutely no medical coverage until your bills go over $5000.  So you essentially double pay.  And then we had to bring my daughter to the emergency room.  She was there 3 hours, turned out to have sort of a standard medical issue curable with ordinary meds. Pricetage? Over $7000!  My point is, if there’s anyone out there who thinks somehow Obama’s plan is good, don’t.  You’re being sold a line.

I dont support the Obama plan simply because I’m a bit of an idealist and not a very good pragmatist. his plan just doesnt go far enough. Your experience though has nothing to do with the Obama plan. Hospital bills have not increased as a result of the health care reform bill. ER visits have always been very expensive. Some of that is for good reason ( Doctors, nurses and high tech equipment have to be on call 24 hours a day even though they may be underutilized for large periods of time), and some not so good ( ER malpractice rates are very high, indigent patients use the ER as there primary care center and you have to foot part of the bill when you go there, ER visits also have one of the highest default rates..patients giving false info and never paying the bill)

When you look at the cost of your insurance I think you have to take a bit more of a dispassionate approach. Insurance is a financial instrument. You are paying a company a sum of money in order to pool your risk with others. The insurance company has to estimate what its likely to cost to pay for your medical care during the year on average and then add in a profit margin and they come up with the rate. By taking a $5,000 deductible you are assuming some of the risk so you can get a lower rate. Financially if you can afford it that is usually a smart move. You should never insure anything you can afford to insure yourself.. never buy extended warranties for example and always purchase insurance with the highest deductible that you can afford to bear. You are not paying double when you do this you are simply getting a lower rate in return for assuming some of the risk.

Again this has nothing to do with Obama. This is the way its always been

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Posted: 01 May 2012 03:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I can’t even pay to get insurance of my healthy brother with Down Syndrome.

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Posted: 02 May 2012 10:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I didn’t mean to imply Obamacare had anything to do with my insurance woes.  My point was that my situation is suppose to be (roughly) the end result of implementing Obamacare, i.e. that everyone has insurance which is supposed to drive down costs.  But if everyone had what I had, and I’m sure many many do since like i said I work for a Fortune 250 company who models their insurance offerings similar to other big corps, people would go broke!

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Posted: 02 May 2012 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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CuthbertJ - 02 May 2012 10:22 AM

I didn’t mean to imply Obamacare had anything to do with my insurance woes.  My point was that my situation is suppose to be (roughly) the end result of implementing Obamacare, i.e. that everyone has insurance which is supposed to drive down costs.  But if everyone had what I had, and I’m sure many many do since like i said I work for a Fortune 250 company who models their insurance offerings similar to other big corps, people would go broke!

I have several thousand patients in my solo practice. As a solo practitioner I unfortunately have to be pretty involved in the billing and I don’t know anyone who has a $5,000 deductible. Most plans involve a $20-30 copay and something in the range of $200-500 deductible for hospital visits. The one exception is people who have a medical saving account (MSA) which is usually done in conjunction with a high deductible plan but in those cases they have their MSA to cover the deductible.

The goal of the Affordable Health Care act was to change the system in a way that costs would be reduced. Its debatable how much the current plan would save but in all fairness many of its components haven’t even kicked in yet.

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Posted: 03 May 2012 03:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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I don’t know what the insurance regulations will look like after the new healthcare act takes complete effect, but there should be very stringent regulations on the quality of healthcare provided, including that deductibles be low to nonexistent. Copays should be limited to relatively token amounts so as to discourage pointless overuse of the system. That’s it.

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Posted: 04 May 2012 01:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I refused to pay a 5 minute $500 ambulance trip to the hospital a few years ago. The bill was sent to collections and collectors came after me twice by phone and left voicemail. After that, they stopped calling. It never hurt my credit score or was reported to credit agencies.

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Posted: 04 May 2012 02:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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TenFold - 04 May 2012 01:54 PM

I refused to pay a 5 minute $500 ambulance trip to the hospital a few years ago. The bill was sent to collections and collectors came after me twice by phone and left voicemail. After that, they stopped calling. It never hurt my credit score or was reported to credit agencies.

I’m not sure what your point is. That its OK not to pay your bills if you can get away with it?

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Posted: 04 May 2012 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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A good demonstration of lack of ethics, social responsibility, and no understanding of the many ancillary costs beyond the five minutes. 

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Posted: 04 May 2012 05:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Exactly. A five minute trip ( if it really was that short) is not a five minute trip for the ambulance crew. First they have to get to the patient. Then they have to assess the situation and get him in the ambulance, take him to the hospital, check the patient in, document everything that was done and I mean “everything” to satisfy the insurance companies and the lawyers. The ambulance crew can’t just drop you off at the curb. They have to sign out the patient to the hospital staff, which means they have to recount your medical history and your complaint to the admitting staff and document the transfer of care. An ambulance crew can easily spend 30-45 minutes just interacting with the ER staff before they can leave and get back on the road.

Don’t forget that the ambulance crew is not a taxi driver. There are at least two crew members and they have a lot more training than a cab driver which means they have higher salaries. An ambulance also has to carry more insurance than a cab. The vehicle itself is much more expensive and has to be outfitted with an array of high tech equipment and stocked with consumables, some of which expire without ever getting used and have to be replaced on a regular schedule.

You have to also keep in mind that the crew and equipment aren’t being used 100% of the time. There is downtime when nothing is happening but the crew still has to be paid as does the vehicle lease and insurance. All of that has to be computed into the final fee they have to charge in order to keep the bills paid.

If you really needed the services of the ambulance crew then $500 is a small price to pay to save your life. If you didn’t need their skills take a cab next time. It will be a lot less than $500 but don’t have cardiac arrest on the way.

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Posted: 04 May 2012 05:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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macgyver - 04 May 2012 05:31 PM

Exactly. A five minute trip ( if it really was that short) is not a five minute trip for the ambulance crew. First they have to get to the patient. Then they have to assess the situation and get him in the ambulance, take him to the hospital, check the patient in, document everything that was done and I mean “everything” to satisfy the insurance companies and the lawyers. The ambulance crew can’t just drop you off at the curb. They have to sign out the patient to the hospital staff, which means they have to recount your medical history and your complaint to the admitting staff and document the transfer of care. An ambulance crew can easily spend 30-45 minutes just interacting with the ER staff before they can leave and get back on the road.

Don’t forget that the ambulance crew is not a taxi driver. There are at least two crew members and they have a lot more training than a cab driver which means they have higher salaries. An ambulance also has to carry more insurance than a cab. The vehicle itself is much more expensive and has to be outfitted with an array of high tech equipment and stocked with consumables, some of which expire without ever getting used and have to be replaced on a regular schedule.

You have to also keep in mind that the crew and equipment aren’t being used 100% of the time. There is downtime when nothing is happening but the crew still has to be paid as does the vehicle lease and insurance. All of that has to be computed into the final fee they have to charge in order to keep the bills paid.

If you really needed the services of the ambulance crew then $500 is a small price to pay to save your life. If you didn’t need their skills take a cab next time. It will be a lot less than $500 but don’t have cardiac arrest on the way.

Actually, at that time I had a $25,000/yr premium on my medical insurance and they didn’t want to pay for the ambulance so I just passed on my insurance’s decision to myself and refused to pay.

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Posted: 04 May 2012 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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I dont see how you rationalize that. You are the one who used the service. Ultimately you are responsible for making sure the bill gets paid. Having insurance does not absolve you of that responsibility. If your insurance company doesn’t live up to their end of the bargain you have an obligation to pursue that and get the bill paid. If they say its a service that isn’t cover under your plan then the responsibility is yours to pay the bill. You followed the insurance company’s lead because it was convenient to do so not because it was the right thing to do. What ever happened to personal responsibility in this country?

You got lucky.  You dealt with a company that has a lazy billing service. If you did that to me after i provided a service and made no attempt to work out a solution your name would have gone to collections and been reported to the credit bureaus in a heartbeat.

I absolutely don’t see how you can justify doing that and feel perfectly fine with your decision.

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Posted: 04 May 2012 08:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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TenFold - 04 May 2012 05:55 PM
macgyver - 04 May 2012 05:31 PM

Exactly. A five minute trip ( if it really was that short) is not a five minute trip for the ambulance crew. First they have to get to the patient. Then they have to assess the situation and get him in the ambulance, take him to the hospital, check the patient in, document everything that was done and I mean “everything” to satisfy the insurance companies and the lawyers. The ambulance crew can’t just drop you off at the curb. They have to sign out the patient to the hospital staff, which means they have to recount your medical history and your complaint to the admitting staff and document the transfer of care. An ambulance crew can easily spend 30-45 minutes just interacting with the ER staff before they can leave and get back on the road.

Don’t forget that the ambulance crew is not a taxi driver. There are at least two crew members and they have a lot more training than a cab driver which means they have higher salaries. An ambulance also has to carry more insurance than a cab. The vehicle itself is much more expensive and has to be outfitted with an array of high tech equipment and stocked with consumables, some of which expire without ever getting used and have to be replaced on a regular schedule.

You have to also keep in mind that the crew and equipment aren’t being used 100% of the time. There is downtime when nothing is happening but the crew still has to be paid as does the vehicle lease and insurance. All of that has to be computed into the final fee they have to charge in order to keep the bills paid.

If you really needed the services of the ambulance crew then $500 is a small price to pay to save your life. If you didn’t need their skills take a cab next time. It will be a lot less than $500 but don’t have cardiac arrest on the way.

Actually, at that time I had a $25,000/yr premium on my medical insurance and they didn’t want to pay for the ambulance so I just passed on my insurance’s decision to myself and refused to pay.

Comedic gold! LOL  Was it a matter of life and death?

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