2 of 3
2
Brontosaurus ride
Posted: 22 June 2012 01:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Jr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  90
Joined  2012-04-24
Alexander80 - 22 June 2012 12:27 PM

Are Adam and Eve Dolls or was that some sort of Live-fall-from-grace with actors?

They are dolls.  Creepy, creepy dolls.  So are Noah and his posse.

 Signature 

Dum ratio nos ducet, valebimus et multa bene geremus.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3052
Joined  2011-11-04
George - 22 June 2012 06:08 AM

I think a tougher question would be answering if bringing back, say, an Australopithecus would be moral. Would it be okay to keep “it” (?) in a cage? Would killing it be considered a manslaughter? Could we eat it? Could we marry it? Make it work without a pay? Keep it in a circus?

I am sure the answer to all of the above (with the exception of marriage and legal rights) regarding a Homo erectus would be a ‘no.’ The opposite is true of a chimp. With Australopithecus lying somewhere in between, it would be very hard to answer if they should be treated as animals of humans.

Homo erectus lived on Earth for going on 2 million years, much longer than we newbie sapiens have. Maybe they would be more generally suited for survival than we.

 Signature 

As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3052
Joined  2011-11-04
Alexander80 - 22 June 2012 04:07 AM

Lets say we have all what is needed to bring some species of dinosaurs back to life, like preserved DNA, an Animal capable of laying the eggs etc., should we do it?

Would you like to see dinosaurs in a “Jurassic Park”, keep small ones instead of a cat, or ride on one of them in a dinosaur derby?

Some Japanese scientists are planning to bring back wooly mammoths, if they can get some viable DNA, and have already selected an area in northern Siberia for them to live.  Since we humans probably helped push them over the edge to extinction, maybe it is the ethical thing to do to bring them back.

 Signature 

As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29

.

[ Edited: 22 June 2012 02:47 PM by George ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3153
Joined  2011-08-15

Loved the info on weeds. After Adam ate the fruit then weeds appeared! Unbelievable. Want to know where this crap came from? Read Ronald Numbers “The Creationists, From Scientific Creationism to Intelligent Design”. He shows the evolution (there we go again) of the creationist argument and how they borrowed from the early scientific findings on evolution, Twisted and distorted to fit genesis. Did you visit there out of curiosity? Did you ride the Dino pony like Adam did? Do the mannequins have genitals and a belly button?


Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29
TimB - 22 June 2012 02:20 PM
George - 22 June 2012 06:08 AM

I think a tougher question would be answering if bringing back, say, an Australopithecus would be moral. Would it be okay to keep “it” (?) in a cage? Would killing it be considered a manslaughter? Could we eat it? Could we marry it? Make it work without a pay? Keep it in a circus?

I am sure the answer to all of the above (with the exception of marriage and legal rights) regarding a Homo erectus would be a ‘no.’ The opposite is true of a chimp. With Australopithecus lying somewhere in between, it would be very hard to answer if they should be treated as animals of humans.

Homo erectus lived on Earth for going on 2 million years, much longer than we newbie sapiens have. Maybe they would be more generally suited for survival than we.

If they were better suited for survival than us, they would be here instead of us.  wink

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  207
Joined  2011-09-23
George - 22 June 2012 02:48 PM
TimB - 22 June 2012 02:20 PM
George - 22 June 2012 06:08 AM

I think a tougher question would be answering if bringing back, say, an Australopithecus would be moral. Would it be okay to keep “it” (?) in a cage? Would killing it be considered a manslaughter? Could we eat it? Could we marry it? Make it work without a pay? Keep it in a circus?

I am sure the answer to all of the above (with the exception of marriage and legal rights) regarding a Homo erectus would be a ‘no.’ The opposite is true of a chimp. With Australopithecus lying somewhere in between, it would be very hard to answer if they should be treated as animals of humans.

Homo erectus lived on Earth for going on 2 million years, much longer than we newbie sapiens have. Maybe they would be more generally suited for survival than we.

If they were better suited for survival than us, they would be here instead of us.  wink

Yeah right, those losers better stay dead.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2012 02:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3153
Joined  2011-08-15

Looks like the Russians have the idea and will beat us to the punch. I mentioned this in an earlier thread and would love to see it happen. What a living study!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleistocene_Park


Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2012 07:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01
Thevillageatheist - 22 June 2012 10:14 AM

I know, it pains me too!  Hey Free, you going to visit the noah’s ark exibit near there? Wow, maybe we can see some unicorns on board. Beshear’s thinking about busting out state funds to build it and claims it would bring in some tourist dollars when those fundies come a runnin’ to see all the dinosaurs packed into the boat. A double whammy for Ky. Maybe they’ll ba able to give their teachers a raise from the profits! Not!

I wouldn’t give Ken Ham one red cent to see his carnival of lunacy. Even when I was a xian I refused to go with my church’s group. I am ashamed of the state of Kentucky and the governor (though not surprised). But I have been hearing rumblings that the Ark Encounter might never get built, or might have to be scaled back dramatically. Apparently their fundraising is way behind their projections.

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2012 11:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4576
Joined  2008-08-14

TimB-Some Japanese scientists are planning to bring back wooly mammoths, if they can get some viable DNA, and have already selected an area in northern Siberia for them to live.  Since we humans probably helped push them over the edge to extinction, maybe it is the ethical thing to do to bring them back.

From an ethical point of view, your standpoint is incorrect.  Plus unless I’m mistaken, wooly mammoths exited due to warming climates. Mammals started getting smaller at that time too.  There used to be all kinds of giant sized mammals around that time.
Even if humans hunted them to extinction(like the American Bison-practically) it is just a product of nature.
But subjectively…from an ethical standpoint, let’s not bring them back!  This is human world now, most animals suffer here.(including most humans!)

 Signature 

Row row row your boat gently down the stream.  Merrily Merrily merrily merrily life is but a dream!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2012 12:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01

Hey Jack—check this out:

http://leoweekly.com/news/sacred-playgrounds

LOL

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2012 06:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3153
Joined  2011-08-15

Oh my god that’s hilarious! I laughed till milk came out my nose! I can’t wait to recreate Mohammad’s flight to heaven lol! Crap, if Beshear gets wind of this he’ll bust out the money and try it unless he’s stopped by, duh uh Sarah Palin. LOL

Cap ‘t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2012 09:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  431
Joined  2012-02-02
George - 22 June 2012 08:39 AM
FreeInKy - 22 June 2012 08:22 AM

No, I hadn’t heard that. Who are “they”? I’m pretty sure there were never elephants in North America. Mastadons, yes, but of course they are long gone.

See HERE.

One of the advantages of introducing elephants into the US is that it would reduce the risk of forest fires.  The forests evolved with the mammoth and mastodon, so they would be healthier than they have in millennia.

 Signature 

“There will come a time when it isn’t ‘They’re spying on me through my phone’ anymore. Eventually, it will be ‘My phone is spying on me’.” ― Philip K. Dick

The Atheist in the Trailer Park

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 June 2012 04:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01
Coldheart Tucker - 25 June 2012 09:20 PM

One of the advantages of introducing elephants into the US is that it would reduce the risk of forest fires.  The forests evolved with the mammoth and mastodon, so they would be healthier than they have in millennia.

That and allowing fires to burn out naturally instead of putting them all out.

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 28 June 2012 10:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3052
Joined  2011-11-04
George - 22 June 2012 02:48 PM
TimB - 22 June 2012 02:20 PM
George - 22 June 2012 06:08 AM

I think a tougher question would be answering if bringing back, say, an Australopithecus would be moral. Would it be okay to keep “it” (?) in a cage? Would killing it be considered a manslaughter? Could we eat it? Could we marry it? Make it work without a pay? Keep it in a circus?

I am sure the answer to all of the above (with the exception of marriage and legal rights) regarding a Homo erectus would be a ‘no.’ The opposite is true of a chimp. With Australopithecus lying somewhere in between, it would be very hard to answer if they should be treated as animals of humans.

Homo erectus lived on Earth for going on 2 million years, much longer than we newbie sapiens have. Maybe they would be more generally suited for survival than we.

If they were better suited for survival than us, they would be here instead of us.  wink

Clearly, at the time, and during the conditions in which they died out, they were not better suited for survival.  But for 1.7 million years they hung in there.  in 1.7 million years, they may have faced and come through challenges to survival that homo sapiens have not, so far.

 Signature 

As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 3
2