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The Ethics of Reviving the Long Dead
Posted: 06 July 2012 10:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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The Monkey’s Paw

an audio version

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Posted: 07 July 2012 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 06 July 2012 10:52 PM

The Monkey’s Paw

an audio version

My question is, when the son’s pounding at the door to get in, why didn’t dad just say, “I wish my son was healed and healthy”?  Would have solved all their problems.

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Posted: 07 July 2012 02:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Coldheart Tucker - 05 July 2012 09:31 PM

If Ray Kurzweil is to be believed, then in just a few short decades, we’ll have the necessary technology to revive ice mummies like this Incan girl found back in 1999.  While (I think) it would be impossible to repair her memories completely, her brain would be healthy and any memories she retained, would be invaluable for understanding about her time.

The real question is: Should we do it?  In the case of the Incan girl, and the other children sacrificed with her, they were taken up to the mountain and killed so that they could be with the gods and watch over their local village from the mountain top.  So in reviving her, you’d be taking her from “heaven” and putting her in a world far beyond her comprehension.  Yet, let’s face it, she was a child, killed by a superstitious people for reasons that can only be described as BS, bringing her back would be reversing an injustice that happened centuries ago, and would provide us invaluable insights to a culture we know little about.

So what say you?  Should we do it?  Or should we just leave them be?

The main question is not should we try it but why would we try.  I can understand those wishing to be placed in cryogenics on hope that one Day medical science could find a cure for what caused their death but ancient humans accidentally frozen are an entirely different matter.  so should we attempt to revive an ancient human accidentally frozen, I think not.

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Posted: 07 July 2012 02:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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This does raise the question of how are memories stored in the brain.

What if it is impossible to revive the person but it is possible to see what they saw and hear what they heard?

That would be worthwhile in and of itself.

psik

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Posted: 07 July 2012 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Who said that some data about the brains activity could be taken from the skull itself?
Dont know how that should work, any links?


Back to the topic itself:

My own opinion is: Yes if we can bring back Cavemen, and those sacrificed, or killed for stupid beliefs we should do it, but what should we do if some crazy guy brings back People like Stalin, Mao, Genghis Khan, (Hitler is no option cause he is completely gone) some ancient tyrant?
What should happen to Stalin if he goes on a shopping trip to Moscow, or to Francisco Franco if he is spotted in a Cafe in Barcelona?
Should they be put to trial and sent to prison?

If not, what should be done in the following case:
The Montana-Mangler is sentenced to death for 200+ Cases of murder and cannibalism, he is executed by lethal injection, his grieving family obtains the body and brings him back to life.
Should he be executed again, and his remains destroyed, sent to prison, or stay free because he already has been executed and is clear of his “sins”(has started a new life), or should he be sentenced to 200 more executions just to make it just?

 


Somehow i remember what Judge Dredd once said in an old strip: “There is no way to escape the law, not even death!” grin

[ Edited: 07 July 2012 04:17 PM by Alexander80 ]
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Posted: 07 July 2012 04:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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this is even weirder than the WTC thing

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Posted: 07 July 2012 05:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Right!

Maybe some day we will hear a judge say: “Thats the seventh time i have sentenced you to death, when will you ever learn?”
Or an Attorney:“To put my client in a gas chamber is unnecessary cruel, and bad for his lungs, i demand an execution through firing squad!”
A crime victims testimony:“He stabed me 12 times in the chest, but i cant remember if he tossed me in the lake cause i died before that.”
The police:“Shoot first, ask questions later!”


And what if someone brings back a dead Dalai Lama? Could there be two Incarnations of the Buddha on earth?
Or the Pope?


Oh how i would love to see such things happen it would be an amazing way to f*ck up religious nonsense, the way insurance companys work, law, politics grin

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Posted: 07 July 2012 06:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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“Your honor, what we have here is a clear case of a practical joke gone wrong.  How was my client supposed to know that the deceased was so foolish as to not have an off-site back up copy of himself?”

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Posted: 08 July 2012 10:32 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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If scientists got close to reviving humans, I’d hope that the governments of the world would require cremation on death.

Occam

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Posted: 08 July 2012 04:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Hum interesting question.

If she was a child, then as you said, I doubt she fully realized what she was getting into. But even if she did not want to die, who’s to say that she would prefer this life. What if she wakes up and can’t accept the following situations:

1. That she is alive.
2. That everything around her is so overwhelming (it makes me think of that quote that goes something like this: Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic). Could she handle all the “magic”?
3. She might feel so out of place because everything and everyone she ever cared about is in the past. She may choose to end her life on that point alone.
4. That she was brought back for our own ” experimentation”.

Having said all that, I would choose not to bring her back. But if people go through with it anyways, they would have to find ways to address those issues very carefully. I think a good start would be to revive her exactly where she died, that way she might think the sacrifice did not work somehow. Then we could ease her into “the future”.

All that of course, would only apply to the best case scenario, that of a functioning mind…

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Posted: 09 July 2012 08:25 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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aleksi_zombies_boxcover_600_600.jpg

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Posted: 10 July 2012 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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it’s better than reviving dead horses   smile

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Posted: 11 July 2012 08:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Why?  We can just beat them all over again. smile

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“In the end nature is horrific and teaches us nothing.” -Mutual of Omicron

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Posted: 13 July 2012 12:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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This thread brings to mind the saying “Just because you can do something, doesn’t mean you should.”
Remember the law of unintended consequences!

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“The present age ... prefers the sign to the thing signified, the copy to the original, fancy to reality, the appearance to the essence ... for in these days illusion only is sacred, truth profane.”

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Posted: 15 July 2012 07:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Running with the presumption that such a technology existed, then hell yes bring ancient corpses back to life. For one thing, all that time developing the technology would not have been a waste. Also, maybe the un-deceased would like iced cream - we have that now. Yes, there are unintended consequences to adventurous new breakthroughs, but that should not deter us from those breakthroughs. The 2k year old ice woman might wake up, learn English, write a book about her life, get filthy rich and become the first ancient unfrozen zombie private space explorer. Wouldn’t you want to see an ancient unfrozen zombie private space explorer?

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