A Luminescent Map of the World’s Earthquakes Since 1898
Posted: 06 July 2012 06:55 PM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01

This is really cool, both for the content and for the sheer beauty of the image itself.

You’re looking at the latest work of John Nelson, who is becoming well known for combining natural-disaster data with brilliant visualizations. The Michigan-based designer first captured our attention with a series of fantastic maps of U.S. tornado data. Now, he’s used his talents to chart a century’s worth of earthquakes (a staggering 203,186 of them) across the globe.

You can clearly see the “ring of fire” around the Pacific rim and the other tectonic plate boundaries. Very cool!

Read the article here and be sure to follow the link in the article to the high-res version of the image and be prepared to be wowed.

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 06 July 2012 11:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3799
Joined  2010-08-15
FreeInKy - 06 July 2012 06:55 PM

This is really cool, both for the content and for the sheer beauty of the image itself.

You’re looking at the latest work of John Nelson, who is becoming well known for combining natural-disaster data with brilliant visualizations. The Michigan-based designer first captured our attention with a series of fantastic maps of U.S. tornado data. Now, he’s used his talents to chart a century’s worth of earthquakes (a staggering 203,186 of them) across the globe.

You can clearly see the “ring of fire” around the Pacific rim and the other tectonic plate boundaries. Very cool!

Read the article here and be sure to follow the link in the article to the high-res version of the image and be prepared to be wowed.

That said, Nelson says he’s been surprised at the excitement that his maps have generated, “particularly since there is nothing really new about the data,” which he acquired from publicly accessible databases maintained by NASA, USGS and NCEDC.

Was this supposed to be an animation showing earthquake events over time?  I just got the one image?

 Signature 

How many times do lies need to be exposed
before we have permission to trash them?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2012 05:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1191
Joined  2011-08-01

You got it right. It’s not an animation—just a single image that graphically shows where the earthquake activity has occurred.

 Signature 

Free in Kentucky
—Humanist
“I am patient with stupidity but not with those who are proud of it.”—Edith Sitwell

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 July 2012 09:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1805
Joined  2005-07-20

Good find.  It looks like the Pacific rim is very active compared to the world.  And that the Atlantic rim is away from the activity in the middle of the Atlantic region, and still that is less powerful than the Pacific Ring of Fire.

 Signature 

I saw a happy rainbow recently.

Profile