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In search of WILLPOWER—I am here to inquire: Is it a real power?
Posted: 30 September 2013 04:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 181 ]
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asanta - 30 September 2013 02:52 AM
RevLGKing - 29 September 2013 08:00 PM

More about the book:

Thank GOD for EVOLUTION—How the marriage of science and religion will transform your life and our world.

I am surprised that, other than my comment, no one at http://www.scienceagogo.com has mentioned it. It is recommended by the NY Times and 6 Nobel Science winners.

http://www.ThankGodforEvolution.com—open to all religious traditions. Then there is http://www.TheGreatStory.org—an affiliated educational website ...

I’ll pass, thank you. It is like saying 6 Nobel prize winners recommended ‘views of Mars from Russell’s teapot’.

Not impressed by the Nobel recommendation.

Tell me, were they scientist who received a Nobel prize in the field of evolutionary biology or abiogenesis?

A Nobel prize winner, wins a prize in his or her narrow field of specialty, which says nothing about what he or she knows about anything else.

Unless this is their specific field, the recommendation of 100 Nobel prize winners would fail to impress me.

The following, and curt comment, by you: I’ll pass, thank you. hit me between the eyes.

Do I assume that this is the end of any dialogue, eh?

If that is your wish, let me know. If so, so be it! And I will wish you, WELL!  smile
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BTW, I just checked and found that: Two of the six listed were Nobel Laureates in PHYSIOLOGY and MEDICINE. Lee Hartwell, 2001 and Craig Mello, 2006.

Others were in physics and economics. For details about these, and other cultural and scientific leaders, check http://www.ThankGodforEvolution.com

[ Edited: 01 October 2013 09:47 AM by RevLGKing ]
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Posted: 01 October 2013 12:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 182 ]
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Just a quick comment on Dowd & Barlow. I came across them when I was looking for Sunday curriculum in my last year as a Christian. I am impressed by their ability to be welcomed into churches and to teach actual science in those settings. I’m not impressed by the 6 Nobel Prize winners, in fact it gets a little creepy how often he states that. Don’t get me wrong, I’d love an endorsement like that, but hopefully I wouldn’t bore people with it.

Anyway, I decided not to buy his book after reading some his lengthy essays and listening to a couple speeches. My impression is that he simply renames things. He takes “God’s revealing creation” and renames it “the process of scientific discovery”. He takes “all of history” including planetary formation and calls it “deep time”. I could find the speeches I heard and be more precise in my quotes, but that’s how I remember it.

It’s not a terrible thing, and as a transition strategy, it might be the best thing going. I’m all for giving people easy ways out of believing in myths. But it’s not for me and I wonder about the value of something that is less woo-woo, but still maintains charged language like “God”.

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Posted: 01 October 2013 07:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 183 ]
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Lausten,  grin  Thanks for what you say is a “quick comment on Dowd & Barlow”.

As one who loves using the dialogue method—IMO, a win/win and pleasant game—I am all questions cool smile
1. Since your profile tells me zero about who you are, who are you?
2. When was your “last year as a Christian”? Which denomination? Why did you leave?
3. What are you doing now?
4. Say what you mean by: “... but still maintains charged language like “God”.

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Posted: 02 October 2013 07:52 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 184 ]
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RevLGKing - 01 October 2013 07:11 PM

Lausten,  grin  Thanks for what you say is a “quick comment on Dowd & Barlow”.

1. Since your profile tells me zero about who you are, who are you?
2. When was your “last year as a Christian”? Which denomination? Why did you leave?
3. What are you doing now?
4. Say what you mean by: “... but still maintains charged language like “God”.

Sometimes I think I am the only one who looks at profiles. Guess I’m wrong about that.
You can find more about me at my blog winter60.blogspot.com. The story of when I left the church is titled “Salir de Iglesia”. It’s in english, but happened while I was in Colombia. That would have been August 2010. There is also a “Why I Am an Atheist” entry in there. Search is in the upper left.
Recently I’ve been dealing with recovering from the floods in MN last year. Otherwise, I’m just a guy in a cube.
I consider “God” “charged language” because it carries with it so much history. The word has many definitions, and when in lower case should refer to simply a concept, something understood throughout all cultures as pointing to something beyond our understanding. When you put a capital on it, it becomes a real being, representing powers that have never been shown to really exist. That’s the “charged” part. When people act like something unseen is really there, and act as a representative of that, trouble starts.

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Posted: 02 October 2013 12:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 185 ]
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grin Much appreciated response about your “god-concept”!

Me? As a curious child (born in 1930)—especially when I reached my teens, especially the late years—I never really accepted the Santa-Claus kinda theism in which I was raised—in a third-world level of poverty.

When I experienced the Depression (many deaths of close family, including parents ... friends and neighbours ... mine accidents ... of the “dirty-thirties” ...  destruction and deaths ... enemy subs attack ... 4 iron-ore carriers were sunk ... For details, go to story of Bell Island   http://www.bellisland.net  hit twice in 1942. I was 12 when I saw over 60 bodies of merchant seamen on the beach near where we (the Kings) lived. Prayers beginning with, “O God, almighty, our loving,merciful and heavenly father, unto whom all hearts are open and from whom now secrets are hid, we unworthy servants call on ... and so on ... ” made little sense to me then, and now ...

My family was made up of hard-working fisher folks, boat builders and miners—ones with little formal education. However, my younger sister and I owe a lot to our four older, and not well-educated, siblings—the 2 oldest died in their 20s. I related especially the brother who was 10 years my senior. The Kings also owe a lot to the fact that we had a good, friendly and wise family minister (The United Church of Canada), With his inspiration, I eventually began to awaken to the possibility of getting a university education, beginning at:  http://www.mta.ca  which prepared me to be a minister.

This helped start me to think, and to become acutely AWARE of the physical, mental and spiritual realities in which we all found ourselves. Instead of hard circumstances and my doubts making me into a confirmed atheist, they inspired me to hold on to all my honest doubts and really do some thinking about the meaning and purpose of life. 

This—even before I became familiar with words like philosophy, pneumatology, psychology, somatology and the like—started me on what I now call, the process approach—and still evolving—to a progressive kind of philosophy and theology ...

http://progressivechristianity.ca/prc/?page_id=6

[ Edited: 02 October 2013 06:45 PM by RevLGKing ]
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Posted: 09 October 2013 10:59 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 186 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 25 July 2012 08:28 AM

RevLGKing, you use a lot of metaphor in your descriptions, to the extent that I’m not quite sure what you’re talking about. But I think that I have a gist.

To me, willpower is what people refer to when we have conflicting desires, and the desire for something that is more healthy wins out over something that is less. I disagree that we can freely choose what emotions to feel - to some extent this is true, but not universally. I don’t choose to feel fear when I see a car barreling directly toward me, but I can choose to dwell in fuming anger or forgiveness afterwards.

Not so sure you can do that either. It depends on millions of factors you have no control over, most of which you are not aware of. Que sera, sera.

Lois

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