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The metric system
Posted: 26 August 2012 02:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Also, which do you find easier to work with; 1 cent , 10 cents = 1 dime, 10 dimes = 1 dollar, or the old english Pound Sterling system where 4 farthings = 1 penny, 12 pence = 1 shilling, 20 shillings = 1 pound


Just going back over this thread and BTW I’m envious of you metric types, especially those who aren’t able to convert to the old system. It sounds easy being based on tens but it gets way muddled in the mind of a dyslexic. You probably know this Write but you missed a few: the hay pence ( half penny), thrupence (three pennies), sixpence, half crown ( 2 1/2 shillings), crown (5 shillings), half guinea ( 10S 6p) and the giunea ( 21shillings later replaced by the sovereign). Confusing? Hell yes. The Brits finally gave in and went decimal in the 70’s.
I was at colege when they announced that the U.S. gov’t decided to go metric and remember when they were about to change the math curriculum and then, nothing. They dropped the whole idea like a hot rock. So many protests from the traditionalists and the auto industry having to retool etc. I’m sure there were other issues but really haven’t researched the subject. I wonder though if our students would now be much better at math if it had been a mandated!


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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

  Well, 1 1/ liters is 1500 milliliters.  1 pint is 16 fl. oz.  so 1 pint 2 oz would be 18 fl. oz or 2 1/4 cups, or about 70 ml. 

The problem, Mriana, is that you got tricked by Scott’s posting.  He was talking about Imperial measure which we do NOT use in the U.S.A.  We use the English system in which a pint is sixteen fluid ounces, not twenty.

Occam

[ Edited: 26 August 2012 03:14 PM by Occam. ]
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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 26 August 2012 02:09 PM

It sounds easy being based on tens but it gets way muddled in the mind of a dyslexic.


Cap’t Jack

That is does.  I gather you have a form of dyslexia too?

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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

Wait, Mriana,

1 1/2 liter does not mean 1 X 1/2 liter! It means 1 liter plus 1/2 liter = 1 + .5 = 1.5 liters. Thus 1 1/2 liter is more than 1 liter, by half.

The decimal system has nothing to do with algebraic notation.

There is a difference between the sentence “One half liter” and “One and a half liter”

[ Edited: 26 August 2012 03:55 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Occam. - 26 August 2012 03:06 PM
Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

  Well, 1 1/ liters is 1500 milliliters.  1 pint is 16 fl. oz.  so 1 pint 2 oz would be 18 fl. oz or 2 1/4 cups, or about 70 ml. 

The problem, Mriana, is that you got tricked by Scott’s posting.  He was talking about Imperial measure which we do NOT use in the U.S.A.  We use the English system in which a pint is sixteen fluid ounces, not twenty.

Occam

Yes, you are quite right, but I’m still not sure what 1500 millilitres looks like either.  A reference point might be a bottle of soda, just like a gallon/quart/pint of milk, but I’m still having trouble picturing it in my head.  Despite my problem with numbers, I’m still very visual.  I can see 1cc or 2cc in my head, based on a shot needle. asanta says 1cc and automatically, my mind brings up a way to measure it, via a needle.  I can picture that and say, “OK, I know about how much that is.”

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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Write4U - 26 August 2012 03:47 PM
Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

Wait, Mriana,

1 1/2 liter does not mean 1 X 1/2 liter! It means 1 liter plus 1/2 liter = 1 + .5 = 1.5 liters. Thus 1 1/2 liter is more than 1 liter, by half.

The decimal system has nothing to do with algebraic notation.

I know that, Write4U, but what I want is a point of reference.  1 1/2 would be approximently 3/4 of a bottle of soda, given that is a 2 liter that is.  If you were to say 1 C flour, I picture a measuring cup of flour.

[ Edited: 26 August 2012 03:56 PM by Mriana ]
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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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Mriana - 26 August 2012 03:50 PM

Yes, you are quite right, but I’m still not sure what 1500 millilitres looks like either.

A liter is basically a quart. So 1.5 liters would be about a quart and a pint. (In fact, that would be 1.42 liters, but it’s close enough for eyeballing).

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Posted: 26 August 2012 03:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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dougsmith - 26 August 2012 03:55 PM
Mriana - 26 August 2012 03:50 PM

Yes, you are quite right, but I’m still not sure what 1500 millilitres looks like either.

A liter is basically a quart. So 1.5 liters would be about a quart and a pint. (In fact, that would be 1.42 liters, but it’s close enough for eyeballing).

No, it’s not.  It’s a little more or a little less than a quart, but it is not basically a quart.  I know this, because when I was trying to figure it out as a kid, I tried to put a litre into an empty milk container that was a quart.  All I remember is that the comparison does not work.  The experiment was a failure, whatever the case and I learn that a litre is not approximently a quart.

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Posted: 26 August 2012 04:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Occam. - 26 August 2012 03:06 PM

  Well, 1 1/ liters is 1500 milliliters.  1 pint is 16 fl. oz.  so 1 pint 2 oz would be 18 fl. oz or 2 1/4 cups, or about 70 ml.

The problem, Mriana, is that you got tricked by Scott’s posting.  He was talking about Imperial measure which we do NOT use in the U.S.A.  We use the English system in which a pint is sixteen fluid ounces, not twenty.

Occam

540mls, not 70. 70mls is a little over a quarter cup (60mls).

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Posted: 26 August 2012 04:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Damn, I screwed that up.  I hit the 7 as a typo and meant to go back to get rid of it and enter the correct amount, but I forgot.  red face

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Posted: 26 August 2012 05:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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Mriana - 26 August 2012 03:53 PM
Write4U - 26 August 2012 03:47 PM
Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

Wait, Mriana,

1 1/2 liter does not mean 1 X 1/2 liter! It means 1 liter plus 1/2 liter = 1 + .5 = 1.5 liters. Thus 1 1/2 liter is more than 1 liter, by half.

The decimal system has nothing to do with algebraic notation.

I know that, Write4U, but what I want is a point of reference.  1 1/2 would be approximently 3/4 of a bottle of soda, given that is a 2 liter that is.  If you were to say 1 C flour, I picture a measuring cup of flour.

Actually 1 1/2 liter would be exactly 3/4 (.75) of a 2 liter bottle. That is why it is used in science. In the decimal system there is an exact relationship going backward or forward. There is never an approximation.
OTOH, how does a cup relate to anything else except your cooking experience?

wiki
The cup is a customary unit of measurement for volume, used in cooking to measure liquids (fluid measurement) and bulk foods such as granulated sugar (dry measurement). This measure is usually used as an informal unit in cooking recipes where precision is rarely required, rather than as a measure for the sale of foodstuffs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(volume)

I am not saying that the old Imperial or the newer English sytems are not functional, it is. But this functionality comes from experience, not as a scientific measurement theory.

Note from Mriana:  OOPS!  red face  I’m so embarrassed!  I hope I undid what I did to your post and hope I fixed it to the way it was.  Sorry.  :(

[ Edited: 26 August 2012 07:55 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 26 August 2012 05:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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I am SO SORRY, Write4U!  I meant to hit the quote button and didn’t realize I hit the edit button.  Forgive me?  Here is hopefully the right way to respond now.  red face

Mriana - 26 August 2012 03:53 PM
Write4U - 26 August 2012 03:47 PM
Mriana - 26 August 2012 01:01 PM

Stupid question… What if you have 1 1/2 liters?  That’s not a full liter, so wouldn’t that be represented by a decimal, just as 1 pint 2 oz is recognized?  What would that look like?  1 pint 2 oz looks like 22 oz which is 2 3/4 cups which I can easily picture in my head.

Wait, Mriana,

1 1/2 liter does not mean 1 X 1/2 liter! It means 1 liter plus 1/2 liter = 1 + .5 = 1.5 liters. Thus 1 1/2 liter is more than 1 liter, by half.

The decimal system has nothing to do with algebraic notation.

I know that, Write4U, but what I want is a point of reference.  1 1/2 would be approximently 3/4 of a bottle of soda, given that is a 2 liter that is.  If you were to say 1 C flour, I picture a measuring cup of flour.

Actually 1 1/2 liter would be exactly 3/4 (.75) of a 2 liter bottle. That is why it is used in science. In the decimal system there is an exact relationship going backward or forward. There is never an approximation.
OTOH, how does a cup relate to anything else except your cooking experience?

I’m not sure how 1 C is not an exact measurement when a recipe calls for 1 C.  It turns out fine for me, when I cook, but then again, unless I’m baking, I rarely measure anything.

wiki
The cup is a customary unit of measurement for volume, used in cooking to measure liquids (fluid measurement) and bulk foods such as granulated sugar (dry measurement). This measure is usually used as an informal unit in cooking recipes where precision is rarely required, rather than as a measure for the sale of foodstuffs.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cup_(volume)

I am not saying that the old Imperial sytem is not functional, it is. But this functionality comes from experience, not as a scientific measurement theory.

Cooking is science.  Chemistry to be exact.  In fact, one of my older’s chemistry teachers had them make up this concoction in class, and then said, “This will be the only time I tell you to eat what was made in this room.”  They ate it, esp after they realized it was peanut brittle.

[ Edited: 26 August 2012 05:40 PM by Mriana ]
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Posted: 26 August 2012 05:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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Occam. - 26 August 2012 04:22 PM

Damn, I screwed that up.  I hit the 7 as a typo and meant to go back to get rid of it and enter the correct amount, but I forgot.  red face

Occam

You and I both are screwing up today.  LOL

I blame menopause!  What’s your excuse?

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Mriana
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Posted: 26 August 2012 05:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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That is does.  I gather you have a form of dyslexia too?

Yes and I’ve fought it from year one. I invert number sequences. 323 looks like 232. It took a lot of practice to do basic math let alone what you guys are posting. I’m still fighting it. That’s why my wife keeps the checkbook! More than anything I want to learn sines, cosines and tangents, the key to nautical navigation.

 

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Posted: 26 August 2012 06:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 26 August 2012 05:48 PM

That is does.  I gather you have a form of dyslexia too?

Yes and I’ve fought it from year one. I invert number sequences. 323 looks like 232. It took a lot of practice to do basic math let alone what you guys are posting. I’m still fighting it. That’s why my wife keeps the checkbook! More than anything I want to learn sines, cosines and tangents, the key to nautical navigation.

Cap’t Jack

lol, get a GPS/Plotter, then you just have to point to where you want to go….. cheese

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