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The metric system
Posted: 27 August 2012 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 61 ]
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Austin Harper - 27 August 2012 03:42 PM

I think Derek was saying that 1 cup (8 fluid ounces) of all purpose flour weighs 5 ounces and 1 cup (8 fluid ounces) of cake flour weighs 4 ounces.  For reference, 1 cup of water weighs 8 ounces.  It’s just confusing that ounce has more than one meaning.

I think you’d have the same issues with any measuring system for cooking.

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Posted: 27 August 2012 06:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 62 ]
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One should specify the kind of ounce one is referring to.  A fluid ounce is a measure of volume, while the plain ounce is a measure of weight.  Since few kitchens have scales, most recipes in U.S.A and English cookbooks are by volume: teaspoon, tablespoon, cup, pint, and quart. I haven’t checked cookbooks from countries which use metric.

Occam

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Posted: 27 August 2012 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 63 ]
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Occam. - 27 August 2012 06:01 PM

One should specify the kind of ounce one is referring to.  A fluid ounce is a measure of volume, while the plain ounce is a measure of weight.  Since few kitchens have scales, most recipes in U.S.A and English cookbooks are by volume: teaspoon, tablespoon, cup, pint, and quart. I haven’t checked cookbooks from countries which use metric.

Occam

The ones we have which were printed in England tend to have both.

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 27 August 2012 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 64 ]
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Metric recipe for delicious looking chocolate chip cookies.

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-cookies.cfm

A little history

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-policy.cfm

[ Edited: 27 August 2012 07:37 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 27 August 2012 09:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 65 ]
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Write4U - 27 August 2012 07:32 PM

Metric recipe for delicious looking chocolate chip cookies.

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-cookies.cfm

A little history

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-policy.cfm

That could be great if bakers in the U. S. had measuring cups and spoon in metrics.

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Posted: 28 August 2012 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 66 ]
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Mriana - 27 August 2012 09:43 PM
Write4U - 27 August 2012 07:32 PM

Metric recipe for delicious looking chocolate chip cookies.

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-cookies.cfm

A little history

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-policy.cfm

That could be great if bakers in the U. S. had measuring cups and spoon in metrics.

I’ve yet to see (liquid*) measuring cups that don’t have both metric and English. Then there’s a kitchen scale for the rest. wink

* The ones with the pour spout.

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 28 August 2012 10:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 67 ]
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I’m sure the recent ones do, since metric is still in the offing, but neither of my glass measuring cups (older) do.  However, all of my plastic beakers of various sizes are marked in only metric.  I just noticed that the three urinalysis plastic glasses are marked in both.

Occam

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Posted: 28 August 2012 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 68 ]
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harry canyon - 28 August 2012 10:12 AM
Mriana - 27 August 2012 09:43 PM
Write4U - 27 August 2012 07:32 PM

Metric recipe for delicious looking chocolate chip cookies.

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-cookies.cfm

A little history

http://www.nist.gov/pml/wmd/metric/metric-policy.cfm

That could be great if bakers in the U. S. had measuring cups and spoon in metrics.

I’ve yet to see (liquid*) measuring cups that don’t have both metric and English. Then there’s a kitchen scale for the rest. wink

* The ones with the pour spout.

Take care,

Derek

Well, many of my kitchen items for cooking and baking are almost 100 years old, so I really wouldn’t know.  They made things of better quality back in my great grandmother and grandmother’s days.  I feel very privileged to have inherited them and that they still stand the test of time.

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Posted: 28 August 2012 03:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 69 ]
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Mriana - 28 August 2012 03:06 PM

Well, many of my kitchen items for cooking and baking are almost 100 years old, so I really wouldn’t know.  They made things of better quality back in my great grandmother and grandmother’s days.  I feel very privileged to have inherited them and that they still stand the test of time.

Sweet! Did you inherit any seasoned cast iron as well?

Most of our kitchen stuff is new’ish. (Last few years or so.) We do have a old melon baller and tomato slicer. However, they are decorations. smile

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 28 August 2012 04:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 70 ]
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harry canyon - 28 August 2012 03:39 PM
Mriana - 28 August 2012 03:06 PM

Well, many of my kitchen items for cooking and baking are almost 100 years old, so I really wouldn’t know.  They made things of better quality back in my great grandmother and grandmother’s days.  I feel very privileged to have inherited them and that they still stand the test of time.

Sweet! Did you inherit any seasoned cast iron as well?

Most of our kitchen stuff is new’ish. (Last few years or so.) We do have a old melon baller and tomato slicer. However, they are decorations. smile

Take care,

Derek

My mother got the cast iron skillets.  I wish I had gotten at least one, but for some reason, she called dibs and I lost.

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Posted: 28 August 2012 04:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 71 ]
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Mriana - 28 August 2012 04:03 PM
harry canyon - 28 August 2012 03:39 PM
Mriana - 28 August 2012 03:06 PM

Well, many of my kitchen items for cooking and baking are almost 100 years old, so I really wouldn’t know.  They made things of better quality back in my great grandmother and grandmother’s days.  I feel very privileged to have inherited them and that they still stand the test of time.

Sweet! Did you inherit any seasoned cast iron as well?

Most of our kitchen stuff is new’ish. (Last few years or so.) We do have a old melon baller and tomato slicer. However, they are decorations. smile

Take care,

Derek

My mother got the cast iron skillets.  I wish I had gotten at least one, but for some reason, she called dibs and I lost.

Lodge has been making them pretty much the same for quite some time. The best prices I’ve seen for the pre-seasoned ones are at Walmart. The camp dutch ovens are fun as well. I made fresh biscuits while camping. (Hmm… I seem to have a thing for biscuits. smile)

I was a bit harsh with my frying pans and need to reseason them.  downer

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 30 August 2012 01:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 72 ]
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Well maybe we should return to measuring cubits and stadium, because if the ancients did it that way then it certainly positively absolutely unquestionably definitely surely really conservatively correctly is the right way, sarcastically speaking.  Really though, the foot unit does go back to ancient times.

One is a very flexible number, one electron, one atom, one molecule, one protein chain, one cell, one person, one city, one country, one continent, one planet, on solar system, one galaxy, one universe… all that flexibility has unfortunately led to lots of creativity, rather than simplicity.  Micrometer, millimeter, meter, kilometer, megameter, the SI metric system is so much easier to rescale to larger and smaller sizes.

NIST Metric Program is trying to encourage the metric system here, will the USA really be the very last country to standardize?  Surely a mark of distinction, but not a good one.

Metric Week Begins October 9!  Let the anthropologists worry about the dated systems, they enjoy that kind of work, really they need something to do, its okay. cheese

Mriana - 22 August 2012 04:46 PM

Fractions have always been my speciality.  In fact, I loved doing fractions in school, but not decimals.

Spoken like a mathematician.  But 100 inches / 12 = 8.33… feet is an easier calculation than 348 cm / 100 = 3.48 meters?  1 1/2 liters is 1.5 liters or 1500 milliliters or 1500 cm³, simple.

Just use Google to do your unit conversions by typing any conversion you want, like:
  1 US cup in ml

(1 US cup is 236.588 ml)

Waiter, I’ll have 2.47556584 cubed millicubits of tea, please.

We still have time to switch to duodecimal before the metric change, leading the way instead of following!  smile

In cars some speedometers convert from mi/h to k/h for you.

(Now, you can razzz my math errors, if you can find them.  grin )

[ Edited: 30 August 2012 01:33 PM by jump_in_the_pit ]
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Posted: 30 August 2012 02:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 73 ]
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jump_in_the_pit - 30 August 2012 01:29 PM
Mriana - 22 August 2012 04:46 PM

Fractions have always been my speciality.  In fact, I loved doing fractions in school, but not decimals.

Spoken like a mathematician.  But 100 inches / 12 = 8.33… feet is an easier calculation than 348 cm / 100 = 3.48 meters?  1 1/2 liters is 1.5 liters or 1500 milliliters or 1500 cm³, simple.

Yes, because I honestly don’t know anything about metrics.  We only had for a couple years in elementary school and that was just barely.  That was too many years ago to even try to recall, with what little the teacher went over it.  Because there is rarely any use for it (here in the States) I’ve had no desire or ambition to learn metrics.  I don’t have it memorized like you do.  I couldn’t tell you if cm is 100 or 10, except for the fact you just told me and maybe a few times a year do I need to hunt down a conversion chart. There’s just no need for it.  I go to the store and I see the size of soda or milk I want to buy at the cheapest price and go with it.  If I want a gallon or quart of skim milk, I have a few brands to choose from and I pick the cheapest one.  If I want diet coke, I just choose between rather I want a small bottle or a large bottle, even though I know the large on is a 2L and the small one is 12.5 oz.  I like the 12.5 oz ones best though.

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Posted: 30 August 2012 11:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 74 ]
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When I compare item prices of unequal volumes, I always covert to metric. It makes the job so much easier.

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Posted: 30 August 2012 11:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 75 ]
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harry canyon - 28 August 2012 03:39 PM
Mriana - 28 August 2012 03:06 PM

Well, many of my kitchen items for cooking and baking are almost 100 years old, so I really wouldn’t know.  They made things of better quality back in my great grandmother and grandmother’s days.  I feel very privileged to have inherited them and that they still stand the test of time.

Sweet! Did you inherit any seasoned cast iron as well?

Most of our kitchen stuff is new’ish. (Last few years or so.) We do have a old melon baller and tomato slicer. However, they are decorations. smile

Take care,

Derek

I have 2 well seasoned cast iron pots. I use them frequently, and forbid my sons from washing them. I take care of them myself.

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