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Bad advertising
Posted: 25 September 2012 09:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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advocatus - 25 September 2012 07:15 AM

Commercials are supposed to entertain and catch your attention.  Conveying information about the product is secondary.  The absolute worst example I can think of is an ad campaign for Quiznos subs several years ago.  The commercials featured these little mascots, which were supposed to be funny and cute, but to me they looked like rabid rats.  Absolute worst idea in the world for advertising FOOD!  I still won’t go to a Quiznos place!  Every time I see their signs, I remember that commercial and those rabid rats!

I always thought that those commercials were so bad that they were making fun of other bad commercials.

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Posted: 25 September 2012 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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psikeyhackr - 25 September 2012 07:44 AM
TimB - 22 September 2012 12:21 PM
psikeyhackr - 12 September 2012 09:32 AM

At least 1/3rd of the reason I bought a VCR in the 80s was to skip TV commercials.  1/2 the reason was Star Trek: The Next Generation started.  VHS tapes were $10 back then.  LOL…

psik

I bet that I know what the remaining 1/6th reason was.  (Though I could be projecting.)  smile

So let’s hear it.

psik

To view homemade videos of holiday, special occasions, gatherings of friends and family.  What else?

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Posted: 26 September 2012 07:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Another bad example is the current Geico campaign where the guy is going around giving away money (paying for people’s gas, parking meters, etc.).  Have you seen these?  If I had Geico insurance, I would probably call them up and say, “Hey guys if you don’t need my premium, why not just give it back?  I can use the money too!”  smile

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Posted: 26 September 2012 07:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Geico commercials are an excellent example of what I was talking about earlier. Their objective is for the potential customer to retain and recognize the name of the company. That’s all. You will quickly forget the content of a specific commercial, but you won’t forget the name Geico. If the time comes when you are shopping for a new insurance and you’ll find that Geico’s product looks as good as, say, that of State Farm, you may be inclined to go with Geico just because of some silly commercial that left a significant imprint on your unconscious mind years back.

Anyone who tries to persuade people and understands the psychology of marketing will always try to aim at the unconscious level of people’s mind first.

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Posted: 26 September 2012 10:09 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 11 September 2012 10:52 AM

I consider myself to be a developing skeptical thinker, and sometimes I think that I get things right. Which makes me aggrivated when I see commercials that seem to depend on the lack of attention of it’s viewers to sell a product.

Consider this TV commercial:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_JRuY6WXpM

Starts out fine . . . Brian Urlacher is cool, gives some numbers on DirecTV stuff which I assume are accurate (otherwise legal liability?) but then the commercial falls flat on it’s face. The XFinity details have absolutely no matching numbers to show whether it’s a better or a worse deal than DirecTV for sports; it just gives very general outlines of it’s sports programming, with emphasis on college football.

Um, what?

Your own argument doesn’t even make sense, commercial. It boils down to: “DirecTV costs a lot, but XFinity has cool programming.” Um, so? So does DirecTV. Maybe it’s suppsed to be implied that by stating the things the way it does, that Xfinity is cheaper (even though it doesn’t say so) or that DirecTV has worse programming (which it also doesn’t actually say).

Argh.


Too much stupid.

I think often the way to get people to buy a product, if you don’t care too much how to do it, is to trick them into buying it. I expect the advertisers may well know what works and the ad might well be quite smart.

One example of what I’m saying is the way everybody wants a bargain. So the shops come up with some R.R.P and then slash the price. It’s usually not an offer at all, if someone can reduce a price by 40% or whatever and make a profit there is something wrong.

People often seem to need to be tricked into buying. If you tell it straight and just offer a better product at a lower price 1) They don’t buy it and 2) don’t believe you.

And 3) if you do it that way you also make less profit because your margins are lower.

Stephen

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Posted: 26 September 2012 04:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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George - 26 September 2012 07:34 AM

Geico commercials are an excellent example of what I was talking about earlier. Their objective is for the potential customer to retain and recognize the name of the company. That’s all. You will quickly forget the content of a specific commercial, but you won’t forget the name Geico. If the time comes when you are shopping for a new insurance and you’ll find that Geico’s product looks as good as, say, that of State Farm, you may be inclined to go with Geico just because of some silly commercial that left a significant imprint on your unconscious mind years back.

Anyone who tries to persuade people and understands the psychology of marketing will always try to aim at the unconscious level of people’s mind first.

I agree, George.  That’s why, whenver I see a commercial I don’t like, I immediately turn it off, then close my eyes and think of the company or product while at the same time imagining myself severely nauseated and think of the feelings of vomiting.  That way, whenever I see the the name in the future, while I may not remember the ad content, I feel the emotion of nausea.  It seems to work.  smile

Occam

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Posted: 26 September 2012 05:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Okay, Occam.  grin

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Posted: 26 September 2012 09:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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asanta - 22 September 2012 12:48 AM

I am starting to get 3 or 4 sales calls per day from cranks trying to convince me to give them my hard earned money. I’m glad I have caller ID and can ignore the calls, but I am on the do not call list, I renew every year or two to make sure I stay on it, but there have been more and more flagrant violations of the laws, and it is VERY annoying. Is anyone else getting these calls, do any of you have a solution? They start at 8am and go on until nearly 10pm….even though I never answer the phone. Most are robocalls—illegal, but a few have real people at the other end. I suspect asking them not to call will not work, and may actually bring on even MORE calls.

I have heard (but have nothing but anecdotal ‘evidence’) that the thing to tell them is: ‘Please place me on your do not contact list’. Anecdotal, but every time I’ve done this, whatever group has responded along the lines of: ‘Okay. Thank you.’ And I’ve not received more calls from them. <shrug>

The argument I recall hearing against ‘Please remove me from your phone list’ is that they could easily get your name/number from a different list and therefore still have complied with your original request. Again, I’ve no real evidence what so ever.

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 26 September 2012 09:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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George - 26 September 2012 07:34 AM

Geico commercials are an excellent example of what I was talking about earlier. Their objective is for the potential customer to retain and recognize the name of the company. That’s all. You will quickly forget the content of a specific commercial, but you won’t forget the name Geico. If the time comes when you are shopping for a new insurance and you’ll find that Geico’s product looks as good as, say, that of State Farm, you may be inclined to go with Geico just because of some silly commercial that left a significant imprint on your unconscious mind years back.

Anyone who tries to persuade people and understands the psychology of marketing will always try to aim at the unconscious level of people’s mind first.

Due to the overabundance of Geico commercials I’ve developed an irrational loathing of geckos.  smile

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 30 September 2012 09:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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The telemarketing calls can be fun. When I have the time, patience, I’m a little bored and they ask for me by name I’ll let them finish their spiel. Then say something like “it’s uncanny that you called, I was just thinking about that and I am very interested!” I’ll start asking questions and have them start signing me up for all kinds of stuff. Then when the time comes for the credit card, I’ll say “just a sec, let me get my card”, wait a moment and then disconnect the call. Then when they call back (and they will), disguise my voice and say “Who? There’s nobody here by that name.”
Another way I’ve been meaning to try involves letting them start their spiel and periodically interrupt with “what are you wearing?” and “I’m touching myself, are you?”, a little heavy breathing or other interesting background noises, etc. Might as well let the thing have some entertainment value.

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Posted: 19 October 2012 10:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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It’s not precisely new any more (I can be behind the times when it comes to pop culture) but here’s another one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyh9hATGu2w

Since when have people been concerned about the recentness of slices? If that were the case, sliced bread would never have caught on. Also, this commercial implies that their turkey is fresher because it’s sliced at the restaurant - but of course this says nothing about how long it’s been sitting around before getting sliced up. The poor commercial just completely misses the point. It’s sad because I’ve seen this commercial multiple times now - apparently this level of criticism is beyond the Arby’s advertising team; they dont’ realize how useless it is.

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Posted: 19 October 2012 12:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 19 October 2012 10:44 AM

It’s not precisely new any more (I can be behind the times when it comes to pop culture) but here’s another one:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyh9hATGu2w

Since when have people been concerned about the recentness of slices? If that were the case, sliced bread would never have caught on. Also, this commercial implies that their turkey is fresher because it’s sliced at the restaurant - but of course this says nothing about how long it’s been sitting around before getting sliced up. The poor commercial just completely misses the point. It’s sad because I’ve seen this commercial multiple times now - apparently this level of criticism is beyond the Arby’s advertising team; they dont’ realize how useless it is.

Sadly I think most Americans will agree. “Ohh… That must be fresher.” Advertising firms have great knowledge of human psychology, too bad they don’t use their powers for good.  wink

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 22 October 2012 01:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I can’t put my finger on it, exactly, but I find this commercial to be rather condensending:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=38qqQ-EQ3vk

According to the user comments, this is also very misleading. User comments can be wrong, but this one smacks of being right: “This commercial is EXTREMELY misleading and insults the intelligence of consumers. Here’s why. T-Mobile may have no 4G LTE coverage, but they don’t have no 4G coverage. LTE is just the type of 4G. T-Mobile uses a completely different technology to deliver 4G to its customers and it’s called HSPA+. Sprint was actually using WiMax to deliver 4G up until last year.”

But that’s not what drove me to dislike in the first place. It’s just that the whole concept of presenting the same data in different ways - the way they do it - feels insulting.

hmmm

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Posted: 01 June 2013 07:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Here’s another one which has been annoying me lately:

http://www.ispot.tv/ad/7I9l/2013-buick-regal-turbo-sewing-white-quilt

It features an idiot who takes lots of white linens, including his wife’s white dress, makes a big white tarp, and pulls the finished product off his car as an ‘unveiling’. Why is that supposed to sell the car? Does it appeal to people who like the concept of destroying multiple household items to create a vain presentation of their car? Maybe it appeals to someone who has absolutely no concept of value, where they think it’s appropriate to use highly expensive household items to make such a tarp instead of going out and buying an actual tarp, even given the unlikely assumption that making such a display of their car is warranted.

It’s perplexing and a bit insulting. And it’s on every single commercial break when I’m watching the Detroit Tigers.

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