Episode 163 - Does Secular Humanism Have a Political Agenda? Part 1
Posted: 11 February 2013 10:04 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Part One of a three-part presentation featuring nontheists from across the political spectrum.

On March 3, 2012, the Council for Secular Humanism and the Center for Inquiry presented the last full day of their conference titled “Moving Secularism Forward” at the Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport in Orlando, Florida.

The Saturday-afternoon session posed the question, “Does Secular Humanism Have a Political Agenda?” Is secular humanism politically agnostic, or is there a political orientation that best reflects its goals and values? Four nontheists with four different political leanings—progressive, conservative, libertarian, and radical Leftist—discussed how secular humanism does – or doesn’t – dovetail with their points of view.

For the libertarian viewpoint, Ronald Bailey is the award-winning science correspondent for Reason magazine and its website, Reason.com. He is the author of Liberation Biology: The Moral and Scientific Case for the Biotech Revolution.

For the conservative viewpoint, Razib Khan is the founder of the web site Secular Right.com He contributes to several blogs including Discover magazine’s Gene Expression, as well as Brown Pundits and Sepia Mutiny.

For the radical leftist viewpoint, Greg Laden is an anthropologist and a prolific blogger on topics from politics to science and skepticism.

Representing the progressive viewpoint, Patricia Schroeder served in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1997, where she became the first woman to serve on the House Armed Services Committee. She has also taught at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

In this episode we will hear the presentations by Ronald Bailey and Razib Khan.

http://www.centerforinquiry.net/centerstage/episodes/episode_163_-_does_secular_humanism_have_a_political_agenda_part_1

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Posted: 11 February 2013 12:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I can answer the question in a lot fewer words.  Secular Humanists sometimes have political agendas.  Secular Humanism does not.  People who embrace those principles sometimes decide to form an agenda for themselves, but a set of principes cannot form an agenda itself.  Sorry for top posting, but the screed was too long and said nothing of any consequence.

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Matthew Licata - 11 February 2013 10:04 AM

Part One of a three-part presentation featuring nontheists from across the political spectrum.

On March 3, 2012, the Council for Secular Humanism and the Center for Inquiry presented the last full day of their conference titled “Moving Secularism Forward” at the Hyatt Regency Orlando International Airport in Orlando, Florida.

The Saturday-afternoon session posed the question, “Does Secular Humanism Have a Political Agenda?” Is secular humanism politically agnostic, or is there a political orientation that best reflects its goals and values? Four nontheists with four different political leanings—progressive, conservative, libertarian, and radical Leftist—discussed how secular humanism does – or doesn’t – dovetail with their points of view.

For the libertarian viewpoint, Ronald Bailey is the award-winning science correspondent for Reason magazine and its website, Reason.com. He is the author of Liberation Biology: The Moral and Scientific Case for the Biotech Revolution.

For the conservative viewpoint, Razib Khan is the founder of the web site Secular Right.com He contributes to several blogs including Discover magazine’s Gene Expression, as well as Brown Pundits and Sepia Mutiny.

For the radical leftist viewpoint, Greg Laden is an anthropologist and a prolific blogger on topics from politics to science and skepticism.

Representing the progressive viewpoint, Patricia Schroeder served in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1973 to 1997, where she became the first woman to serve on the House Armed Services Committee. She has also taught at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

In this episode we will hear the presentations by Ronald Bailey and Razib Khan.

http://www.centerforinquiry.net/centerstage/episodes/episode_163_-_does_secular_humanism_have_a_political_agenda_part_1

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