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Pat Robertson Blames Education For Lack Of Miracles In America
Posted: 08 April 2013 10:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Quoting PLaClair:

My definition of a miracle = an occurrence that produces a result so marvelous that we didn’t think it was possible.

  And just about everything we accept as standard from canned goods to computers would be considered miracles by everyone two hundred years ago.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 11:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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  And just about everything we accept as standard from canned goods to computers would be considered miracles by everyone two hundred years ago.


Computers yes, but not canning Occam. That was invented for Napoleon’s armies by Nicholas Appert in 1809. Just sayin’. Now light bulbs and the telephone? Yeah, pretty much except one fundie preacher called it a “tool of the devil”. Alexander Graham Bell was a minion of Satan?


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Posted: 08 April 2013 02:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Am I understanding this correctly, there is a lack of miracles in America, but they’re just rampant in Africa? I wonder if the famished and those suffering from AIDS would agree?

Oddly enough, they probably would. Wishful thinking and desperation coupled with cognitive dissonance can go a long way towards clouding good judgement. Especially when the snake oil salesman is a charismatic preacher.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 04:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 08 April 2013 11:01 AM

  And just about everything we accept as standard from canned goods to computers would be considered miracles by everyone two hundred years ago.


Computers yes, but not canning Occam. That was invented for Napoleon’s armies by Nicholas Appert in 1809.

I wonder what they’d call botulism in the miraculous canned goods? Punishment from god for fooling mother nature?


...........

 

 


Just sayin’. Now light bulbs and the telephone? Yeah, pretty much except one fundie preacher called it a “tool of the devil”. Alexander Graham Bell was a minion of Satan?

 


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Posted: 08 April 2013 05:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I wonder what they’d call botulism in the miraculous canned goods? Punishment from god for fooling mother nature?

In Napoleon’s army? In all probability some victualler would be taken out and shot. End of story. Quote Napoleon when crossing the Namur River after one of his marshalls remarked “we’ll be in Brussels by morning god willing”, Nap replied, “God”? “God’s got nothing to do with it”!

 


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Posted: 08 April 2013 07:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Quoting TVA:

Computers yes, but not canning Occam. That was invented for Napoleon’s armies by Nicholas Appert in 1809.

  Yeah, I knew that, but I was thinking that it was done in glass jars, not metal cans.  However, just to be safe, I suppose I should have said two hundred and ten years ago instead of two hundred years ago.  smile

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Posted: 08 April 2013 08:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Occam. - 08 April 2013 07:40 PM

Quoting TVA:

Computers yes, but not canning Occam. That was invented for Napoleon’s armies by Nicholas Appert in 1809.

  Yeah, I knew that, but I was thinking that it was done in glass jars, not metal cans.  However, just to be safe, I suppose I should have said two hundred and ten years ago instead of two hundred years ago.  smile

Occam

LOL  Occam, my grandmother canned in glass jars.  However, I think I missed something, because I’m not sure how canning and Napoleon’s armies relate, unless it is another term for “sacking” as in “sacking a city”.

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Posted: 08 April 2013 08:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Occam. - 08 April 2013 10:30 AM

Quoting PLaClair:

My definition of a miracle = an occurrence that produces a result so marvelous that we didn’t think it was possible.

  And just about everything we accept as standard from canned goods to computers would be considered miracles by everyone two hundred years ago.

Occam

That’s true. In fact, we could look at it that way today: we can marvel at and be inspired by the history of human progress in science and technology. Sagan surely was. Tyson is. Einstein was. And the harm in that is . . .?

Einstein said there are two ways of looking at things. One is that nothing is a miracle. The other is that everything is. The Humanist conception of miracles recognizes that it’s all in how we look at things subjectively. It’s an attitude. I prefer a positive attitude over a negative attitude. They’re both attitudes. Why not adopt the attitude that looks forward and upward and that inspires us to do more? Many of our greatest creative geniuses did exactly that.

[ Edited: 08 April 2013 09:15 PM by PLaClair ]
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Posted: 09 April 2013 03:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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  Occam, my grandmother canned in glass jars.  However, I think I missed something, because I’m not sure how canning and Napoleon’s armies relate, unless it is another term for “sacking” as in “sacking a city”.


Ok Lois, a little history lesson, and BTW both my grandmothers and my mother in law canned veggies, fruits and meat in glass jars, especially pickled corn, beans and beets, a pleasant digression! Canning was invented to preserve food for Napoleon’s army while on the march. His supply lines stretched back to France and were easily cut so canning would preserve food to serve his men and each soldier required at least three meals daily. His Grand Armee consisted of 600,000 men. You do the math here!. after the Napoleonic Wars canning spread to GB and America. Of course inventors in both countries were working on the concept as well, mainly for the navy.

 

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Posted: 09 April 2013 03:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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  Yeah, I knew that, but I was thinking that it was done in glass jars, not metal cans.  However, just to be safe, I suppose I should have said two hundred and ten years ago instead of two hundred years ago. 


Now you’re safe Occam. And they still called it canning even though it was done in glass jars!  cheese


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Posted: 09 April 2013 03:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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I’m not sure, but I think I’ve read that the word ‘can’, evolved from the word canister.  Canister was a munition where many musket balls were packed in a tin container and fired from a cannon.  When they started using ‘cans’ to contain ‘canned food’ the tin food containers resembled the munition. 

Personally, I’m very hesitant to consider violence as a solution to any problem, but war certainly creates an incentive to come up with new technologies.  As much as I mistrust the military industrial complex we sure get a lot of cool stuff from it.  Hmmm… Would I give up metallurgy if, in turn, North Korea, the cold war, and Nazi Germany never existed?

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Posted: 09 April 2013 04:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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I’m not sure, but I think I’ve read that the word ‘can’, evolved from the word canister.  Canister was a munition where many musket balls were packed in a tin container and fired from a cannon.  When they started using ‘cans’ to contain ‘canned food’ the tin food containers resembled the munition. 

Yes, you’re correct Jeciron. Canister shot was used against packed troops on the battlefield and the musket balls were housed in tin cylinders, the tin disintegrating after being fired. It had a limited range but was deadly, like a big shotgun although a “canister” could be any cylindrical object holding foodstuffs. Sounds reasonable though. The problem with the first tin cans was the lead solder; it was poisonous and people died from long term exposure to the lead until corrected by using a tin based solder.

 

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Posted: 09 April 2013 04:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 09 April 2013 03:08 AM

  Occam, my grandmother canned in glass jars.  However, I think I missed something, because I’m not sure how canning and Napoleon’s armies relate, unless it is another term for “sacking” as in “sacking a city”.


Ok Lois, a little history lesson, and BTW both my grandmothers and my mother in law canned veggies, fruits and meat in glass jars, especially pickled corn, beans and beets, a pleasant digression! Canning was invented to preserve food for Napoleon’s army while on the march. His supply lines stretched back to France and were easily cut so canning would preserve food to serve his men and each soldier required at least three meals daily. His Grand Armee consisted of 600,000 men. You do the math here!. after the Napoleonic Wars canning spread to GB and America. Of course inventors in both countries were working on the concept as well, mainly for the navy.

 

Cap’t Jack

Thank you, but I’m not Lois.  My late grandmother’s sister is named Lois though, as well as someone here on the board.  LOL

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Posted: 09 April 2013 06:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Sorry Mriana, I confused Lois’s post with yours then went back and saw it was from you. As an aside, I don’t have any relatives named Lois, and the first time I heard that named used was in the TV show Superman back in the 50’s. Must have been a popular name then. Oh, wait a minute, I went to high school with a girl named Lois but that was in the 60’s. Since then, no Loises. Do you can?  grin


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Posted: 09 April 2013 09:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 09 April 2013 06:36 AM

Sorry Mriana, I confused Lois’s post with yours then went back and saw it was from you. As an aside, I don’t have any relatives named Lois, and the first time I heard that named used was in the TV show Superman back in the 50’s. Must have been a popular name then. Oh, wait a minute, I went to high school with a girl named Lois but that was in the 60’s. Since then, no Loises. Do you can?  grin


Cap’t Jack

Did you grow up in England where, in my experience, few seem familiar with the name Lois? Thats not the case with most Americans. Actually Lois is in the bible, in II Timothy, so it’s not new. The name had some popularity in the US the 1940s, I hear, though it’s never been a common name. You’re unlikely to find two Loises in the same room.

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