3 of 3
3
Pat Robertson Blames Education For Lack Of Miracles In America
Posted: 09 April 2013 04:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2012-02-02
Thevillageatheist - 09 April 2013 03:11 AM

  Yeah, I knew that, but I was thinking that it was done in glass jars, not metal cans.  However, just to be safe, I suppose I should have said two hundred and ten years ago instead of two hundred years ago. 


Now you’re safe Occam. And they still called it canning even though it was done in glass jars!  cheese


Cap’t Jack

And originally, they used champagne bottles for canning.  It was when the inventor of the process (or one of his associates) moved to England that they switched to metal cans.

 Signature 

“There will come a time when it isn’t ‘They’re spying on me through my phone’ anymore. Eventually, it will be ‘My phone is spying on me’.” ― Philip K. Dick

The Atheist in the Trailer Park

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 04:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3156
Joined  2011-08-15

Did you grow up in England where, in my experience, few seem familiar with the name Lois? Thats not the case with most Americans. Actually Lois is in the bible, in II Timothy, so it’s not new. The name had some popularity in the US the 1940s, I hear, though it’s never been a common name. You’re unlikely to find two Loises in the same room.

No but my ancestors came from York to Jamestown after the colony was founded. I grew up here in the Appalachian highlands until we moved to South Bend, Ind. yeah, there a several biblical names here and not just the cliche Davids and Daniels. I have had students named Elisha and Elijah, Rebeccas and Ruths (one of my Aunt’s middle names) and naturally my wife Sarah. Yes, I married a princess. The most unusual family name however is my Great Aunt Saphrona, Fronie for short. She was Dad’s Aunt on his Father’s side and the only one with that name in our family history, both sides. So thinking back you are only the second Lois I’ve ever encountered. Unique, while my given name is as common John Smith!

 

Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 05:20 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3156
Joined  2011-08-15

And originally, they used champagne bottles for canning.  It was when the inventor of the process (or one of his associates) moved to England that they switched to metal cans.

Right you are CT and the two British inventors began using the tin coated iron cans for food with lead solder as I mentioned and depending what they contained, leeched lead into the food. This may have led to many of the deaths of the ill fated Franklin expedition to the Arctic in 1845. Archeologists and forensic anthropologists were able to examine three perfectly preserved bodies from the expedition and found high levels of lead in their systems (see the Franklin mummies). So canning got off to a pretty shaky start. But I digress, back to Pat and his predictions about god wiping out the homosexual population with hurricanes.

 


Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 05:40 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2602
Joined  2012-10-27

All this talk of canning reminds me of a joke my Dad used to tell.

An Engishman came to the states to learn about farming practices.  He was very impressed by the large yields on many farms. He asked a farmer what he does with so much food.  The farmer said, “We eat what we can and what we can’t eat we can.”

When the Englishman went home he told his friends “I don’t understand Americans. When I asked a farmer what they did with all the extra food they produce, he told me they ate what they could and what they couldn’t eat they could.”

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 April 2013 06:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  7574
Joined  2007-03-02
Lois - 09 April 2013 09:05 AM
Thevillageatheist - 09 April 2013 06:36 AM

Sorry Mriana, I confused Lois’s post with yours then went back and saw it was from you. As an aside, I don’t have any relatives named Lois, and the first time I heard that named used was in the TV show Superman back in the 50’s. Must have been a popular name then. Oh, wait a minute, I went to high school with a girl named Lois but that was in the 60’s. Since then, no Loises. Do you can?  grin


Cap’t Jack

Did you grow up in England where, in my experience, few seem familiar with the name Lois? Thats not the case with most Americans. Actually Lois is in the bible, in II Timothy, so it’s not new. The name had some popularity in the US the 1940s, I hear, though it’s never been a common name. You’re unlikely to find two Loises in the same room.

I was going to mention that Lois is in the Bile.  In fact, my grandmother and her sisters, oldest to the youngest- Esther, Ruth (my grandmother), Lois, and Leah.  See a pattern?  Their father was a Baptist minister.  Even their middle names were Biblical.  My grandmother, born in 1913 was born Mary Ruth.  When she filled out her birth certificate, years later, she changed it to Ruth Mary, because everyone called her Ruth.  They all experienced a lot of “miracles”, including my mother being cured of breast cancer- the dr didn’t get credit, God did.  rolleyes

 Signature 

Mriana
“Sometimes in order to see the light, you have to risk the dark.” ~ Iris Hineman (Lois Smith) The Minority Report

Profile
 
 
   
3 of 3
3