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Driving a hybrid vehicle
Posted: 16 April 2013 03:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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I purchased a used Prius a year and a half ago, and I’ve been happy with the purchase so far. I haven’t had to do any major repairs yet, so even in that sense the decision so far seems to be a decent economic one.

As far as MPG, I think that the foreign-labelled cars in general try to adhere to the letter of the law more than domestics to help avoid frivolous lawsuits. The MPG that I get is pretty close to advertised, and in my experience does depend on a couple of factors:

Don’t drive it like a race car. It’s not.

MPG goes down during the winter. I suspect that this is due to a combination of the battery losing some efficiency with the colder temperatures, and the gasoline mix in Michigan to avoid freezing may also decrease MPG a bit.

The best MPG seems to be around 50MPH, so if I am driving on flat, back roads with very little stopping, I can achieve better than the advertised MPG - over 50, in fact.

Otherwise, on average I seem to get around 43MPG in winter and 47MPG in summer.

For me, the decision wasn’t just about the MPG, although that’s nice - I got what seemed to be a decent price on a used car with 23000 miles on it, and Toyotas have a good reputation for going a while without parts falling off or otherwise failing.

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Posted: 16 April 2013 08:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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asanta - 09 April 2013 09:21 PM
macgyver - 09 April 2013 05:51 PM
asanta - 09 April 2013 04:50 PM

I just discovered, however, CA makes you smog your new diesel at 2 years, instead of 6 years for gas models.

lol.. asanta for those of us who dont live in CA could you translate. I’ve never heard that term before. What does it mean to “smog” your vehicle?

We have to have our vehicles tested every other year to make sure the level of emissions spewing from our tail pipes doesn’t exceed a certain limit.You can’t register your vehicle if you can’t pass the smog test. You have to fix your car so it can pass before registering. There is a loophole though. If the car is over 20 years old (I believe) I doesn’t have to be smogged. Go figure.
I didn’t know other states didn’t do this. :/

It’s because California has the most strict air quality laws. They might have been passed because of the heavy layer of thick smog that used to cover the LA valley. 

It’s surprising when you find out that everyone doesn’t know the California lingo.  You start to think the whole world knows it.  Of course there’s no reason people in other countries and sometimes other US states would know.

Lois

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Posted: 16 April 2013 08:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Lois - 16 April 2013 08:13 PM

It’s surprising when you find out that everyone doesn’t know the California lingo.  You start to think the whole world knows it.  Of course there’s no reason people in other countries and sometimes other US states would know.

Lois

Lois, I didn’t realize it was strictly ‘California lingo’ until it was pointed out to me. It is such a commonplace phrase here, I thought it was used throughout the US.

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Posted: 16 April 2013 08:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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You crazy Californians and your odd dialects confound me.

tongue laugh

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Posted: 17 April 2013 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 16 April 2013 08:43 PM

You crazy Californians and your odd dialects confound me.

tongue laugh

I’ve been told when visiting other states that people can tell I’m from California because I don’t have an accent. wink

Dudes, I had no idea that ‘smog test’ was a California thing. LOL

Take care,

Derek

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Posted: 17 April 2013 11:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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asanta - 16 April 2013 08:38 PM
Lois - 16 April 2013 08:13 PM

It’s surprising when you find out that everyone doesn’t know the California lingo.  You start to think the whole world knows it.  Of course there’s no reason people in other countries and sometimes other US states would know.

Lois

Lois, I didn’t realize it was strictly ‘California lingo’ until it was pointed out to me. It is such a commonplace phrase here, I thought it was used throughout the US.

Easy mistake to make. No harm, no foul.

Lois

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Posted: 17 April 2013 11:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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harry canyon - 17 April 2013 10:56 AM
TromboneAndrew - 16 April 2013 08:43 PM

You crazy Californians and your odd dialects confound me.

tongue laugh

I’ve been told when visiting other states that people can tell I’m from California because I don’t have an accent. wink

Dudes, I had no idea that ‘smog test’ was a California thing. LOL

Take care,


Derek

I’m sure people in Texas, the deep South and Maine (especially native old timers) would say you have an accent. So would people from England and Australia.

After I married an Englishman, my daughter would remark to his mother about her English accent.  My mother-in-law would say, “I don’t have an accent, you have one!”

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Posted: 17 April 2013 04:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Since most movies and many TV shows originate in California with actors who live here, the actors use the accents prevalent in California.  This means our way of speaking is converting the rest of the country to a uniform accent.  Too bad, our politics haven’t been as easily inculcated. smile

Occam

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Posted: 17 April 2013 09:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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asanta - 16 April 2013 08:38 PM
Lois - 16 April 2013 08:13 PM

It’s surprising when you find out that everyone doesn’t know the California lingo.  You start to think the whole world knows it.  Of course there’s no reason people in other countries and sometimes other US states would know.

Lois

Lois, I didn’t realize it was strictly ‘California lingo’ until it was pointed out to me. It is such a commonplace phrase here, I thought it was used throughout the US.

I’ll bet you’re a California native or at least grew up in California.  I’m from New Jersey and had to learn California lingo as a “second language.” You’d be surprised how many things had to be explained to me. For example, I didn’t know what a Sigalert was.  Although it had nothing to do with the lingo, it took me quite a while to figure out four-way stop signs. We didn’t have them in NJ. Traffic had to stop only on one street and the other street always had the right of way.  I had to learn how to pump my own gas, too. To this day, New Jersey is only one of two states that doesn’t allow drivers to pump their own. Oregon is the other one.  I was in NJ some time after I moved here and needed gas.  It was raining.  The attendant came out to pump the gas.  I told him that in Californis the drivers are the ones who have to get wet. The gas costs quite a bit less there, too, even with service.

Lois

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Posted: 17 April 2013 09:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Occam. - 17 April 2013 04:32 PM

Since most movies and many TV shows originate in California with actors who live here, the actors use the accents prevalent in California.  This means our way of speaking is converting the rest of the country to a uniform accent.  Too bad, our politics haven’t been as easily inculcated. smile

Occam

I’m not sure that’s a bad thing. 

I can often detect a California accent.  There are some things that give it away.  The Valley Girl accent is very obvious; not just the accent but the gestures, such as the one for holding a phone.

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Posted: 18 April 2013 06:14 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Since I was born in Mass. spent most of my first eight years in R.I., six months in N.J., then to So.Cal. I still enjoy hearing the tiny tells in people’s accents that indicate where they are from.  Of course, there are always interesting ones like an aerospace guard who was born in Scotland, moved to Brooklyn when he was sixteen, then to Calif. when he was forty - a Scots/Brooklyn accent is pretty weird.  Or my philosophy instructor who got his B.A. at U. of Okada, came to USC, decided it was a party school so got his PhD in Heidelberg - a Japanese/German accent is also pretty weird. smile

Occam

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Posted: 19 April 2013 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Lois - 17 April 2013 09:37 PM

...... The Valley Girl accent is very obvious; not just the accent but the gestures, such as the one for holding a phone.

The ‘valley girl’ accent is a small sub-California dialect. Sometimes even ‘I’ don’t know what they are saying. But maybe it’s a generational thing!  LOL

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Posted: 19 April 2013 12:29 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Occam. - 18 April 2013 06:14 PM

Since I was born in Mass. spent most of my first eight years in R.I., six months in N.J., then to So.Cal. I still enjoy hearing the tiny tells in people’s accents that indicate where they are from.  Of course, there are always interesting ones like an aerospace guard who was born in Scotland, moved to Brooklyn when he was sixteen, then to Calif. when he was forty - a Scots/Brooklyn accent is pretty weird.  Or my philosophy instructor who got his B.A. at U. of Okada, came to USC, decided it was a party school so got his PhD in Heidelberg - a Japanese/German accent is also pretty weird. smile

Occam

The funniest accent I’ve ever heard was a gal who was born and brought up in France but learned Engish in Scotland. So she had a French accent overlaid with a Scottish one.  Something to behold!

Lois

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Posted: 19 April 2013 12:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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asanta - 19 April 2013 10:56 AM
Lois - 17 April 2013 09:37 PM

...... The Valley Girl accent is very obvious; not just the accent but the gestures, such as the one for holding a phone.

The ‘valley girl’ accent is a small sub-California dialect. Sometimes even ‘I’ don’t know what they are saying. But maybe it’s a generational thing!  LOL

It may be.  smile

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Posted: 20 April 2013 01:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Occam. - 17 April 2013 04:32 PM

Too bad, our politics haven’t been as easily inculcated. smile

Occam

Oh no, do you want to see the entire country fail? LOL

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