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Posted: 29 April 2013 05:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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Teach science and then include the math when it helps with the science.  The trouble is with European culture.  Math was part of education for the rich before they were teaching any real science.  So we still have math as a separate subject.

Slowly but surely curriculum coordinators are catching on to the concept of inclusion, i.e. incorporating all of the subjects, math and reading in science, science in literature (fiction, I use scifi in literature classes e.g. Wells’s"Time Machine”) and in social studies. The problem lies in the state mandated tests. State boards of Ed. create standard cookie cutter curriculum to prep students for “real World” jobs and the entire curriculum is planned around this concept, so who needs astronomy, government, music, art, foreign language, basic drafting, life skills (used to be called home ec.) in short, the electives. The standard now is basic skills, reading, writing, math, and science. Cutbacks in state funding may eliminate the non-standard courses in the future. As I’ve mentioned many times here, government classes have been cut to a semester, that is 18 weeks of instruction before we send those potential voters out into the World.


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Posted: 09 May 2013 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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Just came across this post on Coyne’s blog about Tyson going crazy. I especially agree with one of the posters in the comments section:

Hmmm…not sure it’s fair comparing Tyson, an enthusiastically entertaining popularizer of astronomy, with Sagan, the greatest poet of the Twentieth Century.

A current leading candidate for the title of greatest poet of the Twenty-First Century was on that stage next to Tyson — I refer to Richard, of course — but, even then, it’s hard to choose between the two. Sagan’s poetry was more Baroquely elegant, while Richard’s cuts closer to the bone.

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Posted: 09 May 2013 05:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Just came across this post on Coyne’s blog about Tyson going crazy. I especially agree with one of the posters in the comments section:

Hmmm…not sure it’s fair comparing Tyson, an enthusiastically entertaining popularizer of astronomy, with Sagan, the greatest poet of the Twentieth Century.

A current leading candidate for the title of greatest poet of the Twenty-First Century was on that stage next to Tyson — I refer to Richard, of course — but, even then, it’s hard to choose between the two. Sagan’s poetry was more Baroquely elegant, while Richard’s cuts closer to the bone.

Maybe I’n dead from the neck up but I don’t see Tyson “going crazy” in the video! Passionate, yes and attempting to make a point, became flustered and had an emotional outburst. The fact is that we WANT to believe that space exploration is entirely motivated by a sense of exploration; I get that. It’s much more nobler than admitting that there’s profit to be made from spin off products, not to mention personal fame and grant money(especially if the project succeeds) to rely on for the next project. I could go into more detail but will leave it at that for now. And as to Tyson filling Sagan’s spot, I meant as a scientist popularizing astrophysics. No one will ever be a Carl Sagan. He was uniquely inspiring in many ways and verrrrry personable. You feel like the guy was in your living room having a beer and a chat. And as much as I personally admire Dawkins (if that’s who he’s talking about, my assumption because I saw him in the dais) for his intellect and courage, he can be abrasive to the layman; Dawkins lays it on the line. Besides Tyson was double teamed when Nye grabbed him while the other guy punched him in the stomach! Can’t we all get along?


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Posted: 10 May 2013 04:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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I just don’t like loud people and Tyson is loud. He often reminds me of those crazy preachers.

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Posted: 10 May 2013 04:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Believe me when I say that Tyson dosen’t hold a candle to those crazy preachers when it comes to loud, obnoxious and sometimes virtually incoherent preaching! Are you familiar with oral formulaic speech? What we call"old time” preachers can scream bible phrases and gasp for air for hours. I doubt Tyson could shout “thank You Einstein (substituting for Jesus) for that long! But he can be even tempered at debates I’ve watched. I even saw him on Bill maher on evening and he was perfectly normal, no screaming nor incoherence at all!

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Posted: 10 May 2013 04:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Tyson is wonderful. I’ve heard him several times inveighing strongly against the naive notion that the Moon missions were done for sheer scientific exploration. They were essentially military and political showmanship, much as they may have inspired many people to take up science. This is a point he’s quite emphatic about, and he’s exactly right.

The notion that either Sagan or Dawkins (or even Tyson) is the greatest poet of any century is—to put it mildly—absurd hyperbole.

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Posted: 10 May 2013 05:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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We are back to the topic of taste, and as such I doubt we’ll all come to an agreement.

I find science beautiful. For me its beauty lies in its simplicity and the ability of allowing me to understand our world. I don’t want to hear special noisy effects in documentaries and I certainly don’t understand how a striptease (watch Tyson doing a striptease HERE at 47:55) adds anything to the enjoyment of learning. But to each his own, I guess.

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Posted: 10 May 2013 06:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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There’s a certain pattern I see reflected in this so-called “taste”.

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Posted: 10 May 2013 07:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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I like Morgan Freeman narrating documentaries.

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Posted: 10 May 2013 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Was Sagan held in such high regard as a science communicator when he was alive? Or did that start after he died?

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Posted: 11 May 2013 03:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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I don’t know if I’ve just gotten more accepting with age, but I couldn’t stand Carl Sagan’s voice or what I saw as his egotistical belief in his superiority.  Tyson seems much more down-to-earth while demonstrating that he’s just as much of a scientist as Sagan was.

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Posted: 11 May 2013 03:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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mid atlantic - 10 May 2013 03:48 PM

Was Sagan held in such high regard as a science communicator when he was alive? Or did that start after he died?

I have seen interviews of people who knew him who said that some other scientists were jealous of his prominence while he was alive.  But he does seem to have been raised to sainthood since his death.  I don’t mind.

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Posted: 11 May 2013 04:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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I don’t know if I’ve just gotten more accepting with age, but I couldn’t stand Carl Sagan’s voice or what I saw as his egotistical belief in his superiority.  Tyson seems much more down-to-earth while demonstrating that he’s just as much of a scientist as Sagan was.

Occam

Wow Occam, are we talking about the same person? I didn’t feel that he came across as egotistical at all. He reminded me of a teacher who was excited to tell any student who’d listen about something he’d learned. Sagan wanted to create a passion for his subject in the minds of his listeners. I found him inspirational and read every book I could get hold of at the time. If nothing else it kept the publc’s attention focused on space at a time when the Apollo program was on the wane. IMO people were as fascinated by him and Cosmos as they are now, maybe even more so as he began showing up on panels discussing environmental concerns and the possibility of nuclear war.


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Posted: 12 May 2013 04:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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psikeyhackr - 25 April 2013 10:47 AM

I confess to beginning to get bored with exo-planets.  OK, there is a really cool planet 800 lightyears away.  So let’s make the connections in physics to figure out how to get to 20% of light speed and not finding more planets that we can’t get to.

You’ve got to start somewhere.

Hey, we might never “get there.” But who knows what we’ll discover on the way?

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Posted: 12 May 2013 07:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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It’s fascinating, TVA, how people we think would have similar views differ so widely.  For example, I had no interest in a show called “The Big Bang Theory” until my wife who was already mostly paralyzed told me to watch it.  I was shocked at how much I loved and still love that show.  So I recommended it to my daughter and some friends.  She and most of them disliked it.  Strangely, the only people I know who enjoy it as much as I do is an Orange county Libertarian couple.  (That worries me).  Sorry about my Sagan opinion.  smile

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