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Regional American accents
Posted: 29 April 2013 09:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 31 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 29 April 2013 04:21 PM

My Mary sounds more like ‘marry’, and unlike ‘merry’....but that wasn’t a choice.


Here Both words sound identical as in “marry me” and “merry Xmas”. We don’t make a distinction. Same with the name Mary. So “marry me Mary and we’ll both be merry” would confuse a non native speaker.

 

Cap’t Jack

That’s funny because to me, “marry me” and “merry Xmas” sound very different to my ear. :/

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Posted: 29 April 2013 11:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 32 ]
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asanta - 29 April 2013 09:44 PM
Thevillageatheist - 29 April 2013 04:21 PM

My Mary sounds more like ‘marry’, and unlike ‘merry’....but that wasn’t a choice.


Here Both words sound identical as in “marry me” and “merry Xmas”. We don’t make a distinction. Same with the name Mary. So “marry me Mary and we’ll both be merry” would confuse a non native speaker.

 

Cap’t Jack

That’s funny because to me, “marry me” and “merry Xmas” sound very different to my ear. :/

To mine, too.  Most people I know pronounce Mary to rhyme with the way I pronounce berry, but some pronounce merry and marry the same way.  To add to the confusion, some people pronounce berry to rhyme with curry.

Sometimes what we hear and what we say are different. I think I say merry different than I say Mary but some people can’t tell the difference.  They can tell the difference in the way I say marry, though, which, to me,  rhymes with Barry.  The problem is when we write it, a person who says marry rhymes with Barry may pronounce both words to rhyme with berry (to my ear, anyway).  That’s why linguists use linguistic nnotations, but it isn’t exact. It’s impossible to make distinctions in writing that correspond exactly to how people actually sound.  Pronunciation is in the ear of the listener.

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Posted: 30 April 2013 04:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 33 ]
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George - 29 April 2013 12:11 PM

What’s up with Americans saying “uh-huh” instead of “you’re welcome”? I have never seen anyone on TV say that, but it’s seems very common otherwise. I don’t like it at all.  angry

I’ve only ever heard middle aged white women say that. Not many Americans under say, 40, will respond with “you’re welcome” - unless it’s a very formal setting.

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Posted: 30 April 2013 04:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 34 ]
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Lois - 29 April 2013 11:15 AM
mid atlantic - 28 April 2013 03:11 PM
Thevillageatheist - 28 April 2013 12:16 PM

My son-in-law still maintains his Pittsburg accent even though he’s lived here for 13 years. He still says yuns for you all.


Cap’t Jack

Haha, those Yinzers. I’m supposed to hate them, because of football rivalry, but they have a special place in my heart. They say “yunz”, and we in Bmore and Philly say “youze”.

I think NYC says “youze” as well. It’s all the Irish immigrant’s fault. tongue rolleye

Actually, I hear “yiz” in New York and Northern NJ. “Where yiz goin’?”

I’ll be damned.

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Posted: 30 April 2013 06:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 35 ]
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Yeah, “Bawtimer” is part of the local lexicon. It must be said that the “Baltimore accent” is mostly confined to lower, to middle class whites, today. The upper - middle class whites in this area have hardly any trace of any stereotypical East coast accent - except maybe “tidewater”. The Philadelphia accent is very similar to Baltimore’s, but there seems to be far more people in the Philadelphia area with that accent; maybe because it’s simply a much bigger city then Baltimore?

Pittsburgese, OTOH has some similarities with the Baltimore accent, but not as much as the Philadelphia accent does.


I had never even heard the pronunciation of Baltimore (we use the accent on the first syllable and stretch the more) until I talked to some of the locals there. We’ve visited Aberdeen, Annapolis, and B’more to visit the fort and have heard the same accent in all three paces. However, in West MD. Around Fredrick, the South Mountain area, and Cumberland the accent sounds more familiarly Southern. East coast dialects are far more Britsh sounding than the West Trans-Appalachian accents. The farther from the coast, the more the dialect and some of the word meanings change. Yeah, Pittsburgers nazalize words more than we do and we only live five hours down the river from there!


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 01 May 2013 10:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 36 ]
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Lois - 29 April 2013 11:13 AM
advocatus - 29 April 2013 07:17 AM

Yep, thanks for confirming what I already know.  All my life spent in the South and I still don’t have a Southern accent!  I blame television!  smile

You should ask others whether they hear a Southern accent.  They may hear it while you do not. If you lived in a cosmopolitan area, you would be somewhat less likely to develop a noticible Southern accent, especially if your parents didnt have one.  Where did the test place you?

Lois

When I joined the Air Force and started meeting people from various parts of the country, they would usually comment on my lack of a Southern accent.  I’ve even tried faking an accent, and people tell me it sounds like a fake accent!  The frustrating thing is I had a friend who moved here from up North, and within a year she picked up a Southern accent!

The test said I had that “Midlands” accent, essentially no accent at all it said.

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Posted: 01 May 2013 11:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 37 ]
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When I joined the Air Force and started meeting people from various parts of the country, they would usually comment on my lack of a Southern accent.  I’ve even tried faking an accent, and people tell me it sounds like a fake accent!  The frustrating thing is I had a friend who moved here from up North, and within a year she picked up a Southern accent!


Moving to other areas with distinct dialects in all probability washed out your Southern accent as it did ours. With the exception of my mother, my father and brother also lost theirs, although we can slip back into it on occasion. My brother worked hard on eliminating his as he had a career in broadcast journalism, so he had to effect the Midwest accent. He lives on the Carolina coast but still has that Ron Burgandy voice. It’s also a bit easier to lose the Southern drawl if you’re from the upper South or from the Southern coastal area, e.g. Listen to Haley Barbour’s mush mouth accent in comparison to Lindsey Graham’s S.C. Dialect. Graham’s is far more subtle than Barbur’s Mississippi drawl, especially when they get excited about abortion or gun control!


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 01 May 2013 07:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 38 ]
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asanta - 29 April 2013 04:01 PM
George - 29 April 2013 12:11 PM

What’s up with Americans saying “uh-huh” instead of “you’re welcome”? I have never seen anyone on TV say that, but it’s seems very common otherwise. I don’t like it at all.  angry

I’ve never heard that. Either it isn’t common where I live, or I’m ‘running’ with the wrong crowd…

What they say in Southern California, in my experience,  is “No problem!” which can be even more annoying than “uh-huh.”

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Posted: 01 May 2013 08:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 39 ]
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Lois - 28 April 2013 09:56 PM

I think it’s highly unusual to say that Mary and marry sound the same. A lot of people I know say Mary and merry the same way, though.

“Mary” Christmas just sounds plain weird to my ear.  rolleyes

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Posted: 01 May 2013 08:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 40 ]
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Lois - 01 May 2013 07:37 PM
asanta - 29 April 2013 04:01 PM
George - 29 April 2013 12:11 PM

What’s up with Americans saying “uh-huh” instead of “you’re welcome”? I have never seen anyone on TV say that, but it’s seems very common otherwise. I don’t like it at all.  angry

I’ve never heard that. Either it isn’t common where I live, or I’m ‘running’ with the wrong crowd…

What they say in Southern California, in my experience,  is “No problem!” which can be even more annoying than “uh-huh.”

....and in the Bay Area, even that gets shortened to ‘‘no prob’‘, although I still use “you’re welcome”. Lol!

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Posted: 02 May 2013 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 41 ]
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“Mary” Christmas just sounds plain weird to my ear.  


Just out of curiosity Asanta, what do you hear? Would merry sound like miiree? As I said, all three sound identical to me and Lois’s example of merry sounding like curry is exactly the pronunciation of bury here. We burry people not Barry them.


Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 02 May 2013 07:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 42 ]
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Thevillageatheist - 02 May 2013 02:07 PM

“Mary” Christmas just sounds plain weird to my ear.  


Just out of curiosity Asanta, what do you hear? Would merry sound like miiree? As I said, all three sound identical to me and Lois’s example of merry sounding like curry is exactly the pronunciation of bury here. We burry people not Barry them.


Cap’t Jack

Mary and Marry have the same ‘a’ sound as ‘mare’, for ‘merry’, I guess miiree is close, but not exact.

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Posted: 02 May 2013 07:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 43 ]
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asanta - 01 May 2013 08:55 PM
Lois - 01 May 2013 07:37 PM
asanta - 29 April 2013 04:01 PM
George - 29 April 2013 12:11 PM

What’s up with Americans saying “uh-huh” instead of “you’re welcome”? I have never seen anyone on TV say that, but it’s seems very common otherwise. I don’t like it at all.  angry

I’ve never heard that. Either it isn’t common where I live, or I’m ‘running’ with the wrong crowd…

What they say in Southern California, in my experience,  is “No problem!” which can be even more annoying than “uh-huh.”

....and in the Bay Area, even that gets shortened to ‘‘no prob’‘, although I still use “you’re welcome”. Lol!

Thanks for keeping up the standards, Asanta. smile

Lois

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Posted: 04 May 2013 09:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 44 ]
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Lois - 02 May 2013 07:38 PM

Thanks for keeping up the standards, Asanta. smile

Lois

No prob!  tongue laugh

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Posted: 04 May 2013 09:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 45 ]
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asanta - 04 May 2013 09:04 PM
Lois - 02 May 2013 07:38 PM

Thanks for keeping up the standards, Asanta. smile

Lois

No prob!  tongue laugh

Ha! Perfect response!

Lois

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