I wonder why this word is still taboo to me?
Posted: 03 June 2013 06:29 AM   [ Ignore ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  129
Joined  2011-11-06

“Goddammit”
“God damn”
Whatever the way you say it. It seems taboo due to being raised so religious. Despite being an atheist, I still cringe and I can’t figure out why!

Since most Christians think this is a bad word, I liked this explanation I once read:

“God damn is more like a prayer if anything. You are simply asking God to condemn that which is troubling you!” I always laugh at that smile

I digress, do other atheist here have qualms about this word? Furthermore, as an atheist, do you use it since you don’t believe in a “god”? I must say, for some odd reason, if I stub my toe or something, I will say it!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 June 2013 07:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2743
Joined  2011-11-04

I use it in moments of intensely acute frustration.  But I probably did so, as well, in my younger days, when I was a Christian. (It seems ironic to me that a confirmed atheist who is sure that there is absolutely no chance of the existence of a God, would use this particular expletive.) But it’s like the word “Fuck!” used as an expletive.  In each case, it generally just means “I REALLY REALLY don’t like what happened in the immediately preceding moment!”

But there are some expletives that I try to avoid in the presence of certain people, if I think it would unduly offend them.

 Signature 

“Our lives are not our own. From womb to tomb… We are bound to others, past and present… And by each crime and every kindness… We birth our future.”  Sonmi, 2144.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 June 2013 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  129
Joined  2011-11-06
TimB - 03 June 2013 07:39 AM

I use it in moments of intensely acute frustration.  But I probably did so, as well, in my younger days, when I was a Christian. (It seems ironic to me that a confirmed atheist who is sure that there is absolutely no chance of the existence of a God, would use this particular expletive.) But it’s like the word “Fuck!” used as an expletive.  In each case, it generally just means “I REALLY REALLY don’t like what happened in the immediately preceding moment!”

But there are some expletives that I try to avoid in the presence of certain people, if I think it would unduly offend them.

I actually don’t use expletives in the presence of other, I suppose out of respect; I suppose it all depends on context and the given company though. Most expletives come at moments of solitude when really frustrated. Interestingly, I was thinking yesterday, the term “Fuck” is probably the most versatile word in the English language…it can mean just about anything from elation to disdain among others depending on context. Personally, I reserve it for those toe-stubbing moments and never part of lexicon that carries a positive connotation.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 June 2013 09:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1396
Joined  2010-04-22

In some places that compound word is taboo, in some places not, except insomuch that it’s considered vulgar. I just find it to be an extremely weak vulgarity. Even amongst the faithful, trying to command God to damn someone or something is a known futile exercise; God will make his own decisions.

 Signature 

“All musicians are subconsciously mathematicians.”

- Thelonious Monk

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 June 2013 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1741
Joined  2007-10-22

We just called it “foundry talk.” big surprise

 Signature 

Gary the Human

All the Gods and all religions are created by humans, to meet human needs and accomplish human ends.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 03 June 2013 05:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Moderator
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5165
Joined  2010-06-16

I don’t think most of us connect any of these invectives with the particular source item.  They are just given more power by not being acceptable in common usage.  I most cases they are decent ways of expressing anger or frustration, often not even used in the presence of others.  While driving, if I see a particularly stupid bit of behavior by another driver, I may attach a name for the rectal opening to that person.  If the meal I’ve just prepared slips and falls to the floor, I’m quite likely to say a shortened version of feces, or if really annoyed it may be a similar version for copulation.  None of these being done in while others are around. 

Similarly, calling for a diety to curse someone or something is far more likely to be merely an expression of frustration rather than an express request for damnation. 

How’s that for staying within Doug’s rule against profanity?  LOL

Occam

 Signature 

Succinctness, clarity’s core.

Profile