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Fake Colleges
Posted: 09 August 2013 10:40 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Does anyone have a clue as to why over the last few years, these for-profit so-called “colleges” have been coming out of the woodwork? Was some law passed?

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Posted: 10 August 2013 06:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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The economic troubles might be motivating people to sign up for these schools. The’re not fake though, at least in the sense that they are accredited.

I don’t know if it’s worth attending one.

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Posted: 10 August 2013 07:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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If one can get decent education at a reasonable price, thats what matters. (and of course good job opportunities after completing education there).

Personally, though i think a bigger problem is making sure American students don’t turn into robots who know nothing outside thier specialty.
To get an idea of what I am saying see

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fJuNgBkloFE (  with no offence to any Americans, considering that I am one too! )

And people wonder why I always give scholarly references for everything I say.

While democracy has its benefits, I sometimes wonder whether the US is truly ready for it.
Long gone are the days when people would study (and not watch just the news) political issues for hours on end and then make a decision on who to vote for.

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Posted: 10 August 2013 07:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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While democracy has its benefits, I sometimes wonder whether the US is truly ready for it.
Long gone are the days when people would study (and not watch just the news) political issues for hours on end and then make a decision on who to vote for.

Democracy’s not the problem I.J., notice that all the questions ( and this reminds me of Jay Leno’s “man on the street” interviews) are geared to social studies, I.e World cultures, geography, history, and political Science. Well, except for the triangle question. No science, math or literature, not to say that anyone of those interviewees would have an inkling anyway (Coffee Anon?)  but in the past twenty years the emphasis at least in public education has been on the applied arts, a focus on science and math in an effort to “catch up” with other countries and to become more competitive in the market place.  Soooo, you see the results. This is why many conservatives in states with poor academic track records believe that the President is a Muslim (whatever that is) from some place called Kenya and why the likes of Sarah Palin actually had a shot at the Whitehouse.  I’d like to see more people questioned about plane geometry, algebra questions, Earth Science, and basic physics. Wonder how they would respond?

 

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Posted: 11 August 2013 09:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I guess I’m wondering why they seemed to have cropped up in the first place.  Is it just the availability of relatively cheap online access?  Or is there more to it, like a lobby group pushing hard for “for profit” schools.  And as far as getting an education, from the reviews I’ve read, most of these schools are exactly what you’d expect in a greed based capitalist society like the US. Profit first and foremost, education “product” last. So it just seems odd that they would crop us so quickly.

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Posted: 12 August 2013 03:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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CuthbertJ - 11 August 2013 09:35 AM

I guess I’m wondering why they seemed to have cropped up in the first place.  Is it just the availability of relatively cheap online access?  Or is there more to it, like a lobby group pushing hard for “for profit” schools.  And as far as getting an education, from the reviews I’ve read, most of these schools are exactly what you’d expect in a greed based capitalist society like the US. Profit first and foremost, education “product” last. So it just seems odd that they would crop us so quickly.

They’ve been around for a long time. But, there was a law called the 90-10 rule passed in the 90’s that had an effect. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/For-profit_education

Almost all higher education is profit first, though. How can it not be?

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Posted: 12 August 2013 03:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Just one item of many on the subject.

San Diego State was ask by the student body to name any the students that were going to be able to get a 4 yr degree in 4 yrs. Out of 30K students there were only going to be 2. The students were claiming the college classes were being controlled to make the courses take 5 to 6 years.

Yet, for specialized degrees like in the computer field, your private colleges like Coleman College (a couple hundred students) can educate you in 9mos. General Electric and IBM both hired more graduates from Coleman than San Diego State.

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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MikeYohe - 12 August 2013 03:37 AM

Just one item of many on the subject.

San Diego State was ask by the student body to name any the students that were going to be able to get a 4 yr degree in 4 yrs. Out of 30K students there were only going to be 2. The students were claiming the college classes were being controlled to make the courses take 5 to 6 years.

Yet, for specialized degrees like in the computer field, your private colleges like Coleman College (a couple hundred students) can educate you in 9mos. General Electric and IBM both hired more graduates from Coleman than San Diego State.

Sounds about right, can’t have a corporatist/fascist takeover with well rounded non-Yes Men employees can you?

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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mid atlantic - 12 August 2013 03:11 AM

Almost all higher education is profit first, though. How can it not be?

Huh? Public education isn’t profit first (or wasn’t always). The goal is education, and profits are meant to build the institution, not line the pockets of shareholders. The new places are strictly profit above all else.

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:18 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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CuthbertJ - 11 August 2013 09:35 AM

I guess I’m wondering why they seemed to have cropped up in the first place.  Is it just the availability of relatively cheap online access?  Or is there more to it, like a lobby group pushing hard for “for profit” schools.  And as far as getting an education, from the reviews I’ve read, most of these schools are exactly what you’d expect in a greed based capitalist society like the US. Profit first and foremost, education “product” last. So it just seems odd that they would crop us so quickly.

I think it is online access.  Fake schools have always been around but the Internet makes it so much easier for them to advertise and get their message out.  People are often less skeptical about what appears on a webite than some other media. And, presumably, they get good response, so they proliferate.  I remember when fake schools used to advertise on matchbook covers. A dead giveaway to all but the most gullible.

Lois

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Lois - 13 August 2013 10:18 AM
CuthbertJ - 11 August 2013 09:35 AM

I guess I’m wondering why they seemed to have cropped up in the first place.  Is it just the availability of relatively cheap online access?  Or is there more to it, like a lobby group pushing hard for “for profit” schools.  And as far as getting an education, from the reviews I’ve read, most of these schools are exactly what you’d expect in a greed based capitalist society like the US. Profit first and foremost, education “product” last. So it just seems odd that they would crop us so quickly.

I think it is online access.  Fake schools have always been around but the Internet makes it so much easier for them to advertise and get their message out.  People are often less skeptical about what appears on a webite than some other media. And, presumably, they get good response, so they proliferate.  I remember when fake schools used to advertise on matchbook covers. A dead giveaway to all but the most gullible.

Lois

Interesting, on matchbook covers. I did not know that! smile

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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CuthbertJ - 13 August 2013 10:22 AM
Lois - 13 August 2013 10:18 AM
CuthbertJ - 11 August 2013 09:35 AM

I guess I’m wondering why they seemed to have cropped up in the first place.  Is it just the availability of relatively cheap online access?  Or is there more to it, like a lobby group pushing hard for “for profit” schools.  And as far as getting an education, from the reviews I’ve read, most of these schools are exactly what you’d expect in a greed based capitalist society like the US. Profit first and foremost, education “product” last. So it just seems odd that they would crop us so quickly.

I think it is online access.  Fake schools have always been around but the Internet makes it so much easier for them to advertise and get their message out.  People are often less skeptical about what appears on a webite than some other media. And, presumably, they get good response, so they proliferate.  I remember when fake schools used to advertise on matchbook covers. A dead giveaway to all but the most gullible.

Lois

Interesting, on matchbook covers. I did not know that! smile

You’re probably not old enough. wink

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Posted: 13 August 2013 10:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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If you’re interested here’s a site about the history of matchbook cover advertising. Here’s a quote:


“But even as late as the 70s, I still remember seeing matchbook covers that advertised a long list of correspondence courses in the occupation of your choice - from plumbers and pipefitters to doctors, lawyers, audio and x-ray technicians to truck drivers and teachers.”

http://www.cbc.ca/undertheinfluence/season-1/2012/06/17/striking-images-matchbook-advertising-1/

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Posted: 13 August 2013 01:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Yep, you’re right Lois. I remember how we made fun of the matchbook U’s in the 60’s. I believe that there was one called the University of Madagascar. there are a great number of them today that are strictly a for profit business as well as the tutoring schools cropping up in every abandoned building. They now compete with churches for space. Ever heard of Sylvan Learning Centers? They advertise on local TV. as to Mike’s comment, public school systems are funded by state and local taxes and never show a financial profit. What little they do gain from ticket sales to sporting events etc. is folded right back into the system. Universities, especially state supported schools essentially rely on state funding and generous contributions from the alumni (see University of Notre Dame, also one hellova beautiful campus!) who give generously, especially if their football program is top notch (don’t see Penn State at least for ten years).

Cap’t Jack

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Posted: 13 August 2013 04:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Well bless your hearts…I guess I’m not that old!  Not feeling that way lately with kids in college and 50 right around the corner.

I think Sylvan is actually legit.  Places that help students do better in school, for a profit, to me are ok.  Just like an organized tutoring service.  It’s the For Profit schools that drive me nuts.  I think Charter Schools, at least some, are similar.  And the stooges in local government who think privatization is the way to go love it.

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Posted: 14 August 2013 06:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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CuthbertJ - 13 August 2013 10:15 AM
mid atlantic - 12 August 2013 03:11 AM

Almost all higher education is profit first, though. How can it not be?

Huh? Public education isn’t profit first (or wasn’t always). The goal is education, and profits are meant to build the institution, not line the pockets of shareholders. The new places are strictly profit above all else.

Who said anything about public education? I’m talking about higher education in general.

Not all, but many universities are flat out overly expensive in order to make a financial and social profit; obviously money needs to be made to run the place, but some of the money goes to lining the pockets as well.

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