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Comet ISON - The comet of the century?
Posted: 30 November 2013 02:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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GdB - 30 November 2013 09:32 AM
VYAZMA - 30 November 2013 08:08 AM

Ok. I got my binoculars ready.

Perfect. BTW, 7x50 are the lightstrongest, so also the best for comets.

I’ll start to load the batteries of my camera…

I have 12x50.  I have a spotting scope that’s 40x60 as well.

I’ll be looking forward to your fotos.

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Posted: 01 December 2013 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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How’s the song go: gone gone gone ain’t nothing gonna bring it back. sick 

UPDATES:
http://www.skyandtelescope.com/observing/highlights/193909261.html

December 1: Goodbye from SOHO, and a CBET summary. The dimming wisp of ISON’s dust departed from SOHO’s LASCO C3 field of view early today; it’s at the 1 o’clock edge of this image. If it appears brighter in images from the STEREO-A spacecraft (it’s the noisy white blob at left), that’s only because the camera is more sensitive.

Dan Green of the International Astronomical Union’s Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams published a long summary (Electronic Telegram No. 3731) early today. Excerpts:

The comet’s nucleus apparently disrupted near perihelion, with the comet’s head fading from perhaps a peak brightness of visual mag –2 some hours before perihelion to well below mag +1 before perihelion. M. Knight, Lowell Observatory… [adds] that the brightest feature in the coma faded steadily after perihelion from about mag 3.1 in a 95”-radius aperture when the comet first appeared from behind the SOHO coronagraph occulting disk on Nov. 28.92 to about mag 6.5 on Nov. 29.98.
K. Battams, Naval Research Laboratory, writes that, based on the most recent LASCO C3 images (Nov. 30.912 UT)... what remains is very diffuse, largely transparent to background stars, and fading; it appears that basically a cloud of dust remains.

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Posted: 02 December 2013 04:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 01 December 2013 10:56 AM

How’s the song go: gone gone gone ain’t nothing gonna bring it back. sick 

Nice reference!  cool smile

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Posted: 02 December 2013 02:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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In Memoriam

http://www.isoncampaign.org/karl/in-memoriam

Born in a dusty and turbulent environment, comet ISON spent its early years being jostled and struck by siblings both large and small. Surviving a particularly violent first few million years, ISON retreated to the Oort Cloud, where it maintained a largely reclusive existence for nearly four billion years. But around 3-million B.C., a chance encounter with a passing star coerced ISON into undertaking a pioneering career as a Sungrazer. On September 21, 2012, ISON made itself known to us, and allowed us to catalog the most extraordinary part of its spectacular vocational calling.

Donations in ISON’s memory?

In ISON’s memory, donations are encouraged to your local astronomy club, observatory or charity that supports STEM and science outreach programs for children.

ison_obit_sm.jpg

This is how comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) wished to be remembered. [Image credit: Damian Peach]

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Posted: 02 December 2013 11:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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kkwan - 02 December 2013 02:05 PM

In Memoriam

Sniff, sigh… Well, one day there will come another one…

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GdB

“The light is on, but there is nobody at home”

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Posted: 03 December 2013 07:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Don’t despair GdB. Ison may be a visual dud, but it is a scientific bonanza. Not only did we get to see a Sun grazer on its first (and only) pass into the inner solar system, we had several Sun-observing satellites in position to record what happened to Ison as it rounded the Sun. Astronomers will be gleaning new information out of this data for years.

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Posted: 04 December 2013 09:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Thanks for the comfort, Darron. However for me it is little like the difference between having sex or having knowledge about sex… Seeing a comet is just great.

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GdB

“The light is on, but there is nobody at home”

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Posted: 04 December 2013 10:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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PS
Just had a glance in my box of pictures, and found this one… It is Hyakutake, in 1996.
Hope this helps.  downer

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cometHyakutake.jpg
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GdB

“The light is on, but there is nobody at home”

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Posted: 04 December 2013 11:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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GdB - 04 December 2013 10:27 AM

PS
Just had a glance in my box of pictures, and found this one… It is Hyakutake, in 1996.
Hope this helps.  downer

I remember viewing that comet.  We were getting ready to drive out to the country to low light conditions.
I stepped out on the balcony and I could see it right from there. No need to drive anywhere.

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Posted: 11 December 2013 10:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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RIP Comet ISON: Scientists Declare Famous ‘Sungrazer’ Dead After Sun Encounter

Guess its time for the official memorial service. This is the way ISON ends, not with a bang but a whimper.

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Posted: 12 December 2013 03:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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The closest approach of the comet to earth was to be on December 26. Now it seems we will be experiencing a shotgun blast rather than a rifle shot! Yikes! The refuse from the comet cannot be tracked because it is approaching from the direction of the sun… Fire and brimstone?

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Posted: 12 December 2013 03:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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SleepingTroll - 12 December 2013 03:22 PM

The closest approach of the comet to earth was to be on December 26. Now it seems we will be experiencing a shotgun blast rather than a rifle shot! Yikes! The refuse from the comet cannot be tracked because it is approaching from the direction of the sun… Fire and brimstone?

Nope. Just a few more meteors in the sky when Earth passes through the debris. Nothing unusual about that.

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Posted: 12 December 2013 03:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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DarronS - 12 December 2013 03:25 PM
SleepingTroll - 12 December 2013 03:22 PM

The closest approach of the comet to earth was to be on December 26. Now it seems we will be experiencing a shotgun blast rather than a rifle shot! Yikes! The refuse from the comet cannot be tracked because it is approaching from the direction of the sun… Fire and brimstone?

Nope. Just a few more meteors in the sky when Earth passes through the debris. Nothing unusual about that.

The link you provided was interesting… however it is outdated, we were expecting a meteor shower from an intact comet as we passed through its tail, now that it has disintegrated, what will we be passing through?

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Posted: 12 December 2013 03:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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SleepingTroll - 12 December 2013 03:37 PM

The link you provided was interesting… however it is outdated, we were expecting a meteor shower from an intact comet as we passed through its tail, now that it has disintegrated, what will we be passing through?

Debris from a disintegrated comet. Happens almost every night. Nothing to worry about.

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Posted: 12 December 2013 03:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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I think I will spend that day fishing… under a good sturdy bridge!

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