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medical marijuana legalization and crime rates
Posted: 02 April 2014 09:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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TimB - 02 April 2014 05:58 PM
garythehuman - 02 April 2014 03:07 PM

It’s been a few years so I can’t find the relevant articles, don’t remember where they were from, but Portugal decimalized drugs about four years ago and had a significant drop in its violent crime rate almost immediately.

Portugal decriminalized all drugs in 2001.  They never had the increased drug use and chaos that was predicted beforehand by opponents of drug decriminalization.

Of course, the US is a different country with different demographics and citizens who have a different life pattern.  So we don’t know, for sure what would happen here.  But what we do know is that, even with our intense, costly, and seemingly unending “war on drugs”  we have more drug users than any country in the world, along with the biggest # of prisoners per population of any country in the world.

To me, it makes overwhelming sense to legalize and tax mj, the most benign (and possibly even helpful) of street drugs.  In my estimation the potential benefits far outweigh the potential risks.

Anybody can get it now, so keeping it illegal doesn’t lessen its use.  That a government ban has any effect on drug use is a fiction.  If it’s legal its quality can be controlled and any contamination can be detected. And it would be cheaper because it would no longer support and be controlled by the illegal drug trade. It would still be illegal to drive under its influence, to sell it to kids or to smoke it in anyplace cigarettes can’t be smoked. There could be other controls such as how much one person can have in his possession.

Lois

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Posted: 03 April 2014 12:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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And how much do you think would the government save in prison costs?

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Posted: 03 April 2014 04:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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TimB - 02 April 2014 05:58 PM
garythehuman - 02 April 2014 03:07 PM

It’s been a few years so I can’t find the relevant articles, don’t remember where they were from, but Portugal decimalized drugs about four years ago and had a significant drop in its violent crime rate almost immediately.

Portugal decriminalized all drugs in 2001.  They never had the increased drug use and chaos that was predicted beforehand by opponents of drug decriminalization.

Of course, the US is a different country with different demographics and citizens who have a different life pattern.  So we don’t know, for sure what would happen here.  But what we do know is that, even with our intense, costly, and seemingly unending “war on drugs”  we have more drug users than any country in the world, along with the biggest # of prisoners per population of any country in the world.

To me, it makes overwhelming sense to legalize and tax mj, the most benign (and possibly even helpful) of street drugs.  In my estimation the potential benefits far outweigh the potential risks.

That lesson is largely wasted on politicians and the Supreme Court, though. They apparently know nothing of cost/benefit ratios.

Lois

[ Edited: 03 April 2014 05:24 PM by Lois ]
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Posted: 03 April 2014 05:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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garythehuman - 03 April 2014 12:54 PM

And how much do you think would the government save in prison costs?

The prison savings for de-criminalization of all drugs in the US would be around 10 billion plus annually according to this article.

http://consciouslifenews.com/330000-drug-offenders-prison-spends-drug-war-cost-world-hunger/

There would then be increased income from taxing and regulation. Some say this would wipe out our national debt toot sweet.

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Posted: 03 April 2014 05:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Handyman - 03 April 2014 05:02 PM
garythehuman - 03 April 2014 12:54 PM

And how much do you think would the government save in prison costs?

The prison savings for de-criminalization of all drugs in the US would be around 10 billion plus annually according to this article.

http://consciouslifenews.com/330000-drug-offenders-prison-spends-drug-war-cost-world-hunger/

There would then be increased income from taxing and regulation. Some say this would wipe out our national debt toot sweet.

Good point. I had overlooked taxation and saving the costs of imprisonment.

Lois

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Posted: 04 April 2014 01:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Lois - 03 April 2014 05:27 PM
Handyman - 03 April 2014 05:02 PM
garythehuman - 03 April 2014 12:54 PM

And how much do you think would the government save in prison costs?

The prison savings for de-criminalization of all drugs in the US would be around 10 billion plus annually according to this article.

http://consciouslifenews.com/330000-drug-offenders-prison-spends-drug-war-cost-world-hunger/

There would then be increased income from taxing and regulation. Some say this would wipe out our national debt toot sweet.

Good point. I had overlooked taxation and saving the costs of imprisonment.

Lois

Not to mention that drug offense prisoners, or those who will become prisoners if the current system is maintained, are unlikely to become productive tax-paying citizens, as they are marginalized even once they have served their time.  So they often wind up becoming prisoners again, and continuing to drain our economy rather than contribute to it.

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As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

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Posted: 06 April 2014 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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here’s an interesting video, with some provocative ideas regarding criminalizing drug us.

The war on drugs or the war on consciousness - Joe Rogan and Graham Hancock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQb_etyOFUM&feature;

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Posted: 06 April 2014 08:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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TimB - 04 April 2014 01:10 AM
Lois - 03 April 2014 05:27 PM
Handyman - 03 April 2014 05:02 PM
garythehuman - 03 April 2014 12:54 PM

And how much do you think would the government save in prison costs?

The prison savings for de-criminalization of all drugs in the US would be around 10 billion plus annually according to this article.

http://consciouslifenews.com/330000-drug-offenders-prison-spends-drug-war-cost-world-hunger/

There would then be increased income from taxing and regulation. Some say this would wipe out our national debt toot sweet.

Good point. I had overlooked taxation and saving the costs of imprisonment.

Lois

Not to mention that drug offense prisoners, or those who will become prisoners if the current system is maintained, are unlikely to become productive tax-paying citizens, as they are marginalized even once they have served their time.  So they often wind up becoming prisoners again, and continuing to drain our economy rather than contribute to it.

Yes, a vicious circle too many people refuse to see.

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Posted: 07 April 2014 12:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 06 April 2014 07:32 PM

here’s an interesting video, with some provocative ideas regarding criminalizing drug us.

The war on drugs or the war on consciousness - Joe Rogan and Graham Hancock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQb_etyOFUM&feature;

Contrary to our anthem, in this respect, we are not the land of the free.  And neither are we the home of the brave, if we won’t even speak truth to the horrendous abuse of power that the completely failed “war on drugs” has proven to be.  After 40 years and a trillion dollars spent (not to mention the other costs) the USA has the most per capita drug users and the largest prison population of any country in the world.
  This is not new information. But the “war” continues.

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As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

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Posted: 07 April 2014 04:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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TimB - 07 April 2014 12:20 AM
citizenschallenge.pm - 06 April 2014 07:32 PM

here’s an interesting video, with some provocative ideas regarding criminalizing drug us.

The war on drugs or the war on consciousness - Joe Rogan and Graham Hancock
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQb_etyOFUM&feature;

Contrary to our anthem, in this respect, we are not the land of the free.  And neither are we the home of the brave, if we won’t even speak truth to the horrendous abuse of power that the completely failed “war on drugs” has proven to be.  After 40 years and a trillion dollars spent (not to mention the other costs) the USA has the most per capita drug users and the largest prison population of any country in the world.
  This is not new information. But the “war” continues.

Makes you wonder if Congress and others in government aren’t getting a big kickback from keeping it illegal. I can’t see any other reason for their block-headed stance.

Lois

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Posted: 07 April 2014 06:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Lois - 07 April 2014 04:02 AM

Makes you wonder if Congress and others in government aren’t getting a big kickback from keeping it illegal. I can’t see any other reason for their block-headed stance.

Lois

Part of the problem is self-sustaining.  The persons involved in perpetrating the war on drugs, tend to control the message.  They also profit from it, to the extent that it is their livelihood. Politicians get elected by being “tough” on the “scourge” of illicit drugs. Lawyers and Courts and Law Enforcement officials and Prisons have more business. Also, RICO laws enable law enforcement to take over vast amounts of wealth.  Persons who successfully profit from trading in illicit drugs don’t want the system to change, lest they lose their profitable business.  Persons who simply, occasionally, use illicit drugs aren’t going to speak out, because they don’t want to call attention to themselves.

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As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

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Posted: 08 April 2014 08:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Decriminalization of drugs in the US would also go a long way to stopping the drug wars in Mexico and many other parts of the world.  It would also improve US security as the various Criminal gangs/revolutionaries could no longer use their gains from illegal drug production to finance their terrorists attacks.  Of course the military/industrial complex doesn’t like this.  No violence=no funding. cool grin  An intelligent way to get our budget in order without attacking the poor.

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Gary the Human

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