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Could we speak Neanderthal?
Posted: 01 July 2014 07:39 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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That “hyoid bone” thing is way more complicated than I thought… funny how that works.

So, as they used to ask: What’s the moral of this story?

While they were exchanging some genes here and there, pillow talk was inevitable?

The supposition is that it may have facilitated more inter species dating than was previously suspected, at least in Europe and the Middle East which is why BTW Neanderthal influenced genes show up in those of us with European ancestry. Hmm, I wonder what ever happened to 23 and Me?

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Posted: 01 July 2014 03:41 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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not much I guess.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/23andMe

FDA[edit]
According to Anne Wojcicki, 23andMe has been in dialogue with the FDA since 2008.[22] In 2010 the FDA notified several genetic testing companies, including 23andMe, that their genetic tests are considered medical devices and federal approval is required to market them.[13][26] 23andMe first submitted applications for FDA clearance in July and September 2012.[27]

On November 22, 2013, after not hearing from 23andMe for six months, the FDA ordered 23andMe to stop marketing its Saliva Collection Kit and Personal Genome Service (PGS) as 23andMe had not demonstrated that they have “analytically or clinically validated the PGS for its intended uses” and the “FDA is concerned about the public health consequences of inaccurate results from the PGS device”.[27][28][29]

As of December 2, 2013, 23andMe has stopped all advertisements for its PGS test but is still selling the product.[30][31] As of December 5, 2013, 23andMe is only selling raw genetic data and ancestry-related results.[32][33][34] ...

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Posted: 01 July 2014 03:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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That’s too bad. I really wanted to participate in the project.


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Posted: 03 July 2014 10:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Check it out, hot off the press:

Nepalese Sherpas inherited ability to thrive in high altitudes from extinct humans
Meredith Knight | July 3, 2014 | Genetic Literacy Project

[snip]
On their way out of African homo sapiens likely bred with Denisovans somewhere in central Asia where some of the progeny picked up the EPAS1 mutation. For those homo sapiens that migrated to high altitudes, the gene variant was advantageous, so it spread quickly through the population and just kept going. “What we’re learning from ancient genomes is that while each of them may have contributed only a little to our ancestry, those genetic streams were full of tiny golden nuggets of useful genes,” anthropologist John Hawks told Yong.

There is precedent for this kind of interspecies breeding in hominids with direct, beneficial genetic effect, Catherine Brahic points out:

Humans interbred with Neanderthals soon after moving out of Africa, when we were ill-equipped to cope with Eurasian diseases. However Neanderthals had been hanging out in Europe and Asia for much longer, so their immune systems had adapted. There is evidence that humans snagged some of the Neanderthals’ immunity genes when the two mated, perhaps helping us to spread across the planet.
[snip]

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Posted: 04 July 2014 08:10 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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I read about the Sherpas in the pop news recently. They were more concerned with how the Sherpas could withstand the altitudes though. Yea, it seems that we inherited a number of characteristics from our cousins e.g. Lighter skin. Hawks mentions Paabo’s book in one of his blogs. I’m only a little way into it (Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes ) and he discusses the topic in detail, especially referring to the divergence, but not by much of our immediate ancestors and Neanderthal. Good stuff CC. Get the book if you want. I found a hard copy at Barnes and Noble.


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