5 of 5
5
Statins
Posted: 14 March 2015 03:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 61 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2012
Joined  2007-10-28
macgyver - 07 March 2015 02:47 PM

I don’t have the time to watch a video that is over an hour long but if you are quoting him correctly then it’s not worth listening to because he doesn’t have a handle on the facts.

Do you know who was in the video and what he was talking about if you did not take the time to watch it for at least 15 minutes?

 Signature 

I am, therefore I think.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 March 2015 09:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 62 ]
Jr. Member
Rank
Total Posts:  11
Joined  2015-02-03

TODAY:

STATINS ARE NOT PROTECTIVE AGAINST PARKINSON’S
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mds.26152/abstract
Statins, plasma cholesterol, and risk of Parkinson’s disease: A prospective study
Xuemei Huang MD, PhD1,*, Alvaro Alonso MD, PhD2, Xuguang Guo PhD3, David M. Umbach PhD4, Maya L. Lichtenstein MD1, Christie M. Ballantyne MD5, Richard B. Mailman PhD6, Thomas H. Mosley PhD7 and Honglei Chen MD, PhD8
Article first published online: 14 JAN 2015
DOI: 10.1002/mds.26152
Abstract
Previous findings on the association of statins, plasma lipids, and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are confounded by the fact that statins also affect lipid profiles. We prospectively examined plasma lipids and statin use in relation to PD in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Statin use and plasma lipids were assessed at baseline (visit 1, 1987-89) and at three triennial visits thereafter (visits 2-4) until 1998. Potential PD cases were identified from multiple sources and validated where possible. The primary analysis was limited to incident PD cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2008. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from multivariate logistic regression models. Statin use was rare at baseline (0.57%) but increased to 11.2% at visit 4. During this time frame, total-cholesterol levels decreased, particularly among statin users. Fifty-six PD cases were identified after 1998. Statin use before 1998 was associated with significantly higher PD risk after 1998 (odds ratio = 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.11-5.13) after adjusting for total cholesterol and other confounders. Conversely, higher total cholesterol was associated with lower risk for PD after adjustment for statin usage and confounders. Compared with the lowest tertile of average total cholesterol, the odds ratios for PD were 0.56 (0.30-1.04) for the second and 0.43 (0.22-0.87) for the third tertile (Ptrend = 0.02). Statin use may be associated with a higher PD risk, whereas higher total cholesterol may be associated with lower risk. These data are inconsistent with the hypothesis that statins are protective against PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 March 2015 06:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 63 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2012
Joined  2007-10-28
TG_ND - 19 March 2015 09:57 PM

TODAY:

STATINS ARE NOT PROTECTIVE AGAINST PARKINSON’S
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/mds.26152/abstract
Statins, plasma cholesterol, and risk of Parkinson’s disease: A prospective study
Xuemei Huang MD, PhD1,*, Alvaro Alonso MD, PhD2, Xuguang Guo PhD3, David M. Umbach PhD4, Maya L. Lichtenstein MD1, Christie M. Ballantyne MD5, Richard B. Mailman PhD6, Thomas H. Mosley PhD7 and Honglei Chen MD, PhD8
Article first published online: 14 JAN 2015
DOI: 10.1002/mds.26152
Abstract
Previous findings on the association of statins, plasma lipids, and Parkinson’s disease (PD) are confounded by the fact that statins also affect lipid profiles. We prospectively examined plasma lipids and statin use in relation to PD in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Statin use and plasma lipids were assessed at baseline (visit 1, 1987-89) and at three triennial visits thereafter (visits 2-4) until 1998. Potential PD cases were identified from multiple sources and validated where possible. The primary analysis was limited to incident PD cases diagnosed between 1998 and 2008. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from multivariate logistic regression models. Statin use was rare at baseline (0.57%) but increased to 11.2% at visit 4. During this time frame, total-cholesterol levels decreased, particularly among statin users. Fifty-six PD cases were identified after 1998. Statin use before 1998 was associated with significantly higher PD risk after 1998 (odds ratio = 2.39, 95% confidence interval 1.11-5.13) after adjusting for total cholesterol and other confounders. Conversely, higher total cholesterol was associated with lower risk for PD after adjustment for statin usage and confounders. Compared with the lowest tertile of average total cholesterol, the odds ratios for PD were 0.56 (0.30-1.04) for the second and 0.43 (0.22-0.87) for the third tertile (Ptrend = 0.02). Statin use may be associated with a higher PD risk, whereas higher total cholesterol may be associated with lower risk. These data are inconsistent with the hypothesis that statins are protective against PD. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society

I have seen that before you posted and it is scary. I have a friend who went for angioplasty twice over about ten years. Subsequently, he was probably prescribed statins together with other CVD drugs. Seven years ago, he developed PD. He is probably still on statins and is clueless wrt how he developed PD.

The L-DOPA which he takes for his PD is not helping the degenerative disorder of his CNS much.

Ironically, statins, by inhibiting the production of cholesterol (specifically LDL) by the liver, may lead to PD.

 Signature 

I am, therefore I think.

Profile
 
 
   
5 of 5
5