1 of 4
1
Entrails.
Posted: 07 May 2015 09:18 PM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29

As far as I know humans are the only animals that do not consume the entrails of the other animals they eat.  Are there any other carnivores that do not eat the entrails of their prey?  What is the origin of this practice?  I believe that in the Bible there were instructions for the cooking and consuming of the whole animal.  So apparently in ancient times the whole animal was consumed.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 10:03 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1541
Joined  2012-04-25
BreakUp - 07 May 2015 09:18 PM

As far as I know humans are the only animals that do not consume the entrails of the other animals they eat.  Are there any other carnivores that do not eat the entrails of their prey?  What is the origin of this practice?  I believe that in the Bible there were instructions for the cooking and consuming of the whole animal.  So apparently in ancient times the whole animal was consumed.

Umm, spend a few hours watching some of the cooking shows out there, or shows about diners and restaurants around the country/world and you’ll quickly realize your statement is completely false.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 11:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
CuthbertJ - 08 May 2015 10:03 AM
BreakUp - 07 May 2015 09:18 PM

As far as I know humans are the only animals that do not consume the entrails of the other animals they eat.  Are there any other carnivores that do not eat the entrails of their prey?  What is the origin of this practice?  I believe that in the Bible there were instructions for the cooking and consuming of the whole animal.  So apparently in ancient times the whole animal was consumed.

Umm, spend a few hours watching some of the cooking shows out there, or shows about diners and restaurants around the country/world and you’ll quickly realize your statement is completely false.

Not completely, I know there are a few exceptions, but most of what is consumed is not the entrails of the animals that are consumed.  I have cleaned game animals and witnessed domestic animals that are butchered for meat.  The entrails are only used for a few minor cases, unless you would care to cite instances where this is not the case.  What is the percentage of times are the entrails consumed, as opposed to the percentage of times when they are discarded? 

FYI, my experience is in america, so if you have experience with foods in other countries, please present it.

FYI, perhaps I should clarify, by entrails I was referring to the stomach and intestines, I am aware that certain organs are used as food, and some of them are my favorite parts, but the stomach, and especially the intestines are usually discarded.  Also cats are seldom consumed, and even so the guts are not consumed, even though ‘cat gut’ does have a special use.

[ Edited: 08 May 2015 12:09 PM by BreakUp ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 12:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4272
Joined  2014-06-20
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 11:55 AM
CuthbertJ - 08 May 2015 10:03 AM
BreakUp - 07 May 2015 09:18 PM

As far as I know humans are the only animals that do not consume the entrails of the other animals they eat.  Are there any other carnivores that do not eat the entrails of their prey?  What is the origin of this practice?  I believe that in the Bible there were instructions for the cooking and consuming of the whole animal.  So apparently in ancient times the whole animal was consumed.

Umm, spend a few hours watching some of the cooking shows out there, or shows about diners and restaurants around the country/world and you’ll quickly realize your statement is completely false.

Not completely, I know there are a few exceptions, but most of what is consumed is not the entrails of the animals that are consumed.  I have cleaned game animals and witnessed domestic animals that are butchered for meat.  The entrails are only used for a few minor cases, unless you would care to cite instances where this is not the case.  What is the percentage of times are the entrails consumed, as opposed to the percentage of times when they are discarded? 

FYI, my experience is in america, so if you have experience with foods in other countries, please present it.

FYI, perhaps I should clarify, by entrails I was referring to the stomach and intestines, I am aware that certain organs are used as food, and some of them are my favorite parts, but the stomach, and especially the intestines are usually discarded.  Also cats are seldom consumed, and even so the guts are not consumed, even though ‘cat gut’ does have a special use.

The stomach and intestines of several animals are used for food. Intestines have been and still are used for sausage casings. The stomach is used for haggis. The lining of the stomach of cows is tripe, still eaten in many cultures. 

My dad used to say that every part of a pig is used except the oink. Though not all of it for food; some is used for footballs and some by those trying to make silk purses.

Lois

 Signature 

[color=red“Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.”
― George Eliot, Silas Marner[/color]

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 02:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
LoisL - 08 May 2015 12:57 PM

The stomach and intestines of several animals are used for food. Intestines have been and still are used for sausage casings. The stomach is used for haggis. The lining of the stomach of cows is tripe, still eaten in many cultures. 

My dad used to say that every part of a pig is used except the oink. Though not all of it for food; some is used for footballs and some by those trying to make silk purses.

Lois

Fair enough, but still what is the percentage of the material that is consumed compared to the percentage that is discarded.  With wild animals the entrails are almost the first part that is eaten, but with humans it has to be processed and disguised to be considered eatable.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 05:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  5257
Joined  2011-11-04
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 02:07 PM
LoisL - 08 May 2015 12:57 PM

The stomach and intestines of several animals are used for food. Intestines have been and still are used for sausage casings. The stomach is used for haggis. The lining of the stomach of cows is tripe, still eaten in many cultures. 

My dad used to say that every part of a pig is used except the oink. Though not all of it for food; some is used for footballs and some by those trying to make silk purses.

Lois

Fair enough, but still what is the percentage of the material that is consumed compared to the percentage that is discarded.  With wild animals the entrails are almost the first part that is eaten, but with humans it has to be processed and disguised to be considered eatable.

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

 Signature 

As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 07:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4272
Joined  2014-06-20
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 02:07 PM
LoisL - 08 May 2015 12:57 PM

The stomach and intestines of several animals are used for food. Intestines have been and still are used for sausage casings. The stomach is used for haggis. The lining of the stomach of cows is tripe, still eaten in many cultures. 

My dad used to say that every part of a pig is used except the oink. Though not all of it for food; some is used for footballs and some by those trying to make silk purses.

Lois

Fair enough, but still what is the percentage of the material that is consumed compared to the percentage that is discarded.  With wild animals the entrails are almost the first part that is eaten, but with humans it has to be processed and disguised to be considered eatable.

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.


I agree.  I, for one, don’t eat organs of any kind. Just pointing out some things I picked up along the way. I don’t know how much of any animal os wasted. I’ve never been around farm animals or slaughterhouses. A lot of it what is not eaten by humans is made into animal food. The skin is tanned to make leather. Not sure about the bones, but I wouldn’t be surprised if there was some use for them. Fertilizer, maybe.

How did we get onto this subject, anyway? Was there a point to it?

Lois

 Signature 

[color=red“Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.”
― George Eliot, Silas Marner[/color]

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
LoisL - 08 May 2015 07:46 PM

How did we get onto this subject, anyway? Was there a point to it?

Lois

I made the OP and I remember cleaning game animals, and butchering rabbits and other domestic animals, the guts were discarded and only the meat was saved and eaten.  How did people get to this point, that the entrails, (the intestines) are usually discarded and not eaten?  Or at least if they are eaten, there is a very thorough regiment of cleaning, before they are consumed.  Wild predators go after the entrails first after a kill, and sometimes before the prey is dead.

Why don’t you eat the organs or guts of the animal?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 May 2015 08:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

Have you ever eaten any of those parts of the animal?  How do you know that they are less palatable?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 12:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4272
Joined  2014-06-20
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 08:43 PM
LoisL - 08 May 2015 07:46 PM

How did we get onto this subject, anyway? Was there a point to it?

Lois

I made the OP and I remember cleaning game animals, and butchering rabbits and other domestic animals, the guts were discarded and only the meat was saved and eaten.  How did people get to this point, that the entrails, (the intestines) are usually discarded and not eaten?  Or at least if they are eaten, there is a very thorough regiment of cleaning, before they are consumed.  Wild predators go after the entrails first after a kill, and sometimes before the prey is dead.

Why don’t you eat the organs or guts of the animal?

They’re icky. That’s why!

Seriously, though, they probably don’t taste as good to anyone as the rest of the animal. In good times, when meat was plentiful, people could afford to be selective and ate only the parts they liked.  Organs deteriorate more quickly, too, so if they weren’t eaten right away, they would spoil. I don’t know whether wild animals go after the entrails first. If they do it might be that they are more nutritious, so the animals that ate entrails lived longer.

Lois

[ Edited: 09 May 2015 12:09 AM by LoisL ]
 Signature 

[color=red“Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.”
― George Eliot, Silas Marner[/color]

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 04:42 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3594
Joined  2011-08-15

This is probably a topic better suited for Rachel Ray but yes we do eat organ meat. Lots of examples i.e. Chitterlings or chittlins (hog intestines) are a typical southern dish and properly cleaned and cooked are delicious, or at least I think they are. All potted meat products contain beef tripe and Lois has already covered that subject, once again pretty good as a sandwich spread. Ever tasted liver and onions? Back in my “struggle to get through undergrad days” my buddies and I used to split the pot and buy KFC Which included fried chicken livers, gizzards and gravy for supper. Fried hearts were ok but a little tough. Just remember that when a hot dog package states “all beef” it also contains organ meat, which can be listed as beef. As to hunting, we field stripped out the organs as they would be the first to begin rotting and could taint the meat. Before animal domestication you had to consume every part of the animal including the organs and bone marrow for the protein, fats etc. but after domestication herders could afford to pitch the softer meat and go straight for the muscle. Would you rather have a haggis or a well cooked porterhouse steak?


Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 08:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
Thevillageatheist - 09 May 2015 04:42 AM

Would you rather have a haggis or a well cooked porterhouse steak?

Cap’t Jack

I’ve had both, and if given the choice, would probably pick the Haggis.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3594
Joined  2011-08-15

I’ve had both, and if given the choice, would probably pick the Haggis.

Haggis? Man, you must not be from Texas!


Cap’t Jack

 Signature 

One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 10:31 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  570
Joined  2012-02-02

Observe the cholesterol content.

porkbrainsbig.gif

 Signature 

“There will come a time when it isn’t ‘They’re spying on me through my phone’ anymore. Eventually, it will be ‘My phone is spying on me’.” ― Philip K. Dick

The Atheist in the Trailer Park

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 01:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
Thevillageatheist - 09 May 2015 09:53 AM

I’ve had both, and if given the choice, would probably pick the Haggis.

Haggis? Man, you must not be from Texas!

Cap’t Jack

No I’m not, and glad of it.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 09 May 2015 02:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  792
Joined  2015-03-29
Coldheart Tucker - 09 May 2015 10:31 AM

Observe the cholesterol content.

porkbrainsbig.gif

I haven’t seen any of those in the local grocery store around here.  Based on the cholesterol that would be just shy of 12 servings of the amount of cholesterol for one day.  I’m glad I don’t have any problem with cholesterol, I eat what ever I want and don’t have to worry about it.  Are they expensive? I’d like to try some.

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 4
1