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Posted: 09 May 2015 02:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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BreakUp - 09 May 2015 01:58 PM
Thevillageatheist - 09 May 2015 09:53 AM

I’ve had both, and if given the choice, would probably pick the Haggis.

Haggis? Man, you must not be from Texas!

Cap’t Jack

No I’m not, and glad of it.

I also don’t live my life according to what some Bozo in a bar, half full of beer, says what a real man is.

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Posted: 09 May 2015 06:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I also don’t live my life according to what some Bozo in a bar, half full of beer, says what a real man is.


Or a drunken Scotsman half full of Guinness in a tavern and blowing on a doodle sack.


Cap’t Jack

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Thomas Paine

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Posted: 09 May 2015 07:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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I haven’t seen any of those in the local grocery store around here.  Based on the cholesterol that would be just shy of 12 servings of the amount of cholesterol for one day.  I’m glad I don’t have any problem with cholesterol, I eat what ever I want and don’t have to worry about it.  Are they expensive? I’d like to try some.

My grandmother used to fix some of the tastiest pork brains and served them with eggs. Delicious but ALL organ meat is high in cholesterol and I wouldn’t recommend a steady diet of them, especially if you’re sedentary.


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One good schoolmaster is of more use than a hundred priests.

Thomas Paine

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Posted: 09 May 2015 07:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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BreakUp - 09 May 2015 02:05 PM
Coldheart Tucker - 09 May 2015 10:31 AM

Observe the cholesterol content.

porkbrainsbig.gif

I haven’t seen any of those in the local grocery store around here.  Based on the cholesterol that would be just shy of 12 servings of the amount of cholesterol for one day.  I’m glad I don’t have any problem with cholesterol, I eat what ever I want and don’t have to worry about it.  Are they expensive? I’d like to try some.

$16 for two cans on Amazon, including shipping.  Not something that I’d want to even consider, given that diseases similar Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) have been reported in people who’ve ingested pork brains.  If Gawd wanted us to eat brains, he’d have made them easier to get to.

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Posted: 09 May 2015 08:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Coldheart Tucker - 09 May 2015 07:30 PM
BreakUp - 09 May 2015 02:05 PM
Coldheart Tucker - 09 May 2015 10:31 AM

Observe the cholesterol content.

porkbrainsbig.gif

I haven’t seen any of those in the local grocery store around here.  Based on the cholesterol that would be just shy of 12 servings of the amount of cholesterol for one day.  I’m glad I don’t have any problem with cholesterol, I eat what ever I want and don’t have to worry about it.  Are they expensive? I’d like to try some.

$16 for two cans on Amazon, including shipping.  Not something that I’d want to even consider, given that diseases similar Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) have been reported in people who’ve ingested pork brains.  If Gawd wanted us to eat brains, he’d have made them easier to get to.

Damn! 600 degrees is enough to really mess up the food.  Maybe I’ll try something else. 

I had someone say something similar about potatoes, if God had intended for people to eat potatoes, God wouldn’t have hidden them in the ground.

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Posted: 10 May 2015 06:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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BreakUp - 08 May 2015 08:48 PM
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

Have you ever eaten any of those parts of the animal?  How do you know that they are less palatable?

Well, the stomach contains something akin to vomit and the intestines contain shit. But you’re right, the association may be more psychological than real, AFAIK.  OTOH, I have eaten haggis.  It would not be on my monthly meal plan list, if I had a monthly meal plan. (One time a year, at most.)

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As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

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Posted: 10 May 2015 06:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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TimB - 10 May 2015 06:15 PM
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 08:48 PM
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

Have you ever eaten any of those parts of the animal?  How do you know that they are less palatable?

Well, the stomach contains something akin to vomit and the intestines contain shit. But you’re right, the association may be more psychological than real, AFAIK.  OTOH, I have eaten haggis.  It would not be on my monthly meal plan list, if I had a monthly meal plan. (One time a year, at most.)

I had Haggis several years ago, and it was prepared by the head chef at one of the better local hotels, and it was really, really good.  Perhaps it’s all in the preparation as to how good it turns out.

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Posted: 10 May 2015 09:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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BreakUp - 10 May 2015 06:33 PM
TimB - 10 May 2015 06:15 PM
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 08:48 PM
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

Have you ever eaten any of those parts of the animal?  How do you know that they are less palatable?

Well, the stomach contains something akin to vomit and the intestines contain shit. But you’re right, the association may be more psychological than real, AFAIK.  OTOH, I have eaten haggis.  It would not be on my monthly meal plan list, if I had a monthly meal plan. (One time a year, at most.)

I had Haggis several years ago, and it was prepared by the head chef at one of the better local hotels, and it was really, really good.  Perhaps it’s all in the preparation as to how good it turns out.

Haggis is basically a sausage. It contains the same sort of ingredients any sausage contains—the same cuts of meat, spices and fillers. In the case of haggis, the filler is oatmeal. It is nothing to get excited about.

Pork brains in milk gravy is something else!

 

Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see either being made.

Attributed to Otto von Bismarck and others.

Lois

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Posted: 11 May 2015 08:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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LoisL - 10 May 2015 09:23 PM
BreakUp - 10 May 2015 06:33 PM

I had Haggis several years ago, and it was prepared by the head chef at one of the better local hotels, and it was really, really good.  Perhaps it’s all in the preparation as to how good it turns out.

Haggis is basically a sausage. It contains the same sort of ingredients any sausage contains—the same cuts of meat, spices and fillers. In the case of haggis, the filler is oatmeal. It is nothing to get excited about.

Pork brains in milk gravy is something else!

Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see either being made.

Attributed to Otto von Bismarck and others.

Lois

I have had several different varieties of sausage and some I like and others I do not like, so even if all contain similar cuts of meat, spices and filler, it’s the exact combination that makes the difference.  Usually the filler doesn’t add much to the flavor, but just carries the flavor of the meat and spices in the mix.  Another factor, other than which sausage are used, is the preparation, and this can make or break a dish of food.  Whether it is good or not, it also depends on the taste of the individual.  Some people like some food and other people like different kinds of food.

Have you eaten Pork brains in milk gravy? and if you have, did you like it?

Even considering what I posted about preparation, there is a dish that I really like, but is extremely simple.  Kielbasa and potatoes cooked in water.  I cut up the Kielbasa and the potatoes and just bring the whole pot to a boil and cook it for awhile.  I use the particular variety of Kielbasa that is found in grocery stores here in central Pa, which look like the pieces in the center of the plate, in the photo at the top of the article. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kielbasa

[ Edited: 11 May 2015 08:16 AM by BreakUp ]
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Posted: 11 May 2015 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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I used to live near a cat that would enjoy killing bunny rabbits. Sometimes he would eat their top half and leave the bottom half for me, as a gift, on my porch. Sometimes he would eat the bottom half and leave me the top half. On other occasions he would simply kill the animals and not eat any of it.

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Posted: 11 May 2015 12:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Other Quadrant - 11 May 2015 11:57 AM

I used to live near a cat that would enjoy killing bunny rabbits. Sometimes he would eat their top half and leave the bottom half for me, as a gift, on my porch. Sometimes he would eat the bottom half and leave me the top half. On other occasions he would simply kill the animals and not eat any of it.

I had a dog once that came back to the house with half a squirrel, but I don’t remember which half.

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Posted: 11 May 2015 04:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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BreakUp - 10 May 2015 06:33 PM
TimB - 10 May 2015 06:15 PM
BreakUp - 08 May 2015 08:48 PM
TimB - 08 May 2015 05:08 PM

We probably are less interested in eating stomach and intestines, because they are less palatable.  If we were less successful in acquiring animals to eat, and were hungry enough, we would, no doubt, eat stomach and intestines, regularly as well.

Have you ever eaten any of those parts of the animal?  How do you know that they are less palatable?

Well, the stomach contains something akin to vomit and the intestines contain shit. But you’re right, the association may be more psychological than real, AFAIK.  OTOH, I have eaten haggis.  It would not be on my monthly meal plan list, if I had a monthly meal plan. (One time a year, at most.)

I had Haggis several years ago, and it was prepared by the head chef at one of the better local hotels, and it was really, really good.  Perhaps it’s all in the preparation as to how good it turns out.

Well, Robert Burns would agree with you re: its positive attributes, “Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face, Great Chieftan o’ the Puddin-race!”.  (From Ode to a Haggis)

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Posted: 11 May 2015 05:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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BreakUp - 11 May 2015 08:06 AM
LoisL - 10 May 2015 09:23 PM
BreakUp - 10 May 2015 06:33 PM

I had Haggis several years ago, and it was prepared by the head chef at one of the better local hotels, and it was really, really good.  Perhaps it’s all in the preparation as to how good it turns out.

Haggis is basically a sausage. It contains the same sort of ingredients any sausage contains—the same cuts of meat, spices and fillers. In the case of haggis, the filler is oatmeal. It is nothing to get excited about.

Pork brains in milk gravy is something else!

Laws are like sausages, it is better not to see either being made.

Attributed to Otto von Bismarck and others.

Lois

I have had several different varieties of sausage and some I like and others I do not like, so even if all contain similar cuts of meat, spices and filler, it’s the exact combination that makes the difference.  Usually the filler doesn’t add much to the flavor, but just carries the flavor of the meat and spices in the mix.  Another factor, other than which sausage are used, is the preparation, and this can make or break a dish of food.  Whether it is good or not, it also depends on the taste of the individual.  Some people like some food and other people like different kinds of food.

Have you eaten Pork brains in milk gravy? and if you have, did you like it?

Even considering what I posted about preparation, there is a dish that I really like, but is extremely simple.  Kielbasa and potatoes cooked in water.  I cut up the Kielbasa and the potatoes and just bring the whole pot to a boil and cook it for awhile.  I use the particular variety of Kielbasa that is found in grocery stores here in central Pa, which look like the pieces in the center of the plate, in the photo at the top of the article. 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kielbasa

I’ve eaten kielbasa often. Hillshire Farms used to make a decent kielbasa, but I don’t see it in the stores anymore—at least not in California. At one time I lived near a Polish butcher shop in NJ that made its own kielbasa. It was delicious.

I make it this way, slice the kielbasa and brown it a little until it gives up some of its fat. Add cut-up potatoes, peppers and onions . Cook for 20 minutes or so stirring occasionally.

Lois

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Posted: 14 May 2015 06:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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LoisL - 11 May 2015 05:26 PM

I’ve eaten kielbasa often. Hillshire Farms used to make a decent kielbasa, but I don’t see it in the stores anymore—at least not in California. At one time I lived near a Polish butcher shop in NJ that made its own kielbasa. It was delicious.

I make it this way, slice the kielbasa and brown it a little until it gives up some of its fat. Add cut-up potatoes, peppers and onions . Cook for 20 minutes or so stirring occasionally.

Lois

Hillshire Farms is the brand we buy around here, and it turns out pretty good.  I have to try your stir-fry, it sounds good.

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Posted: 30 July 2015 01:36 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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A little side note; did you know that we kill more chickens per year that there are people on earth.

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