Project ES
Posted: 01 November 2015 06:01 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Hello everyone,

I was doing a lot of thinking lately (among other things) and a lot of ideas was “scratching” my front door. One of them was Project ES (designation given by me). So, you’re probably wondering what’s that or what do I even mean by ES = EyeSight. Through fringe science we’ve been taught that science is only limited by our imagination. If we open our mind to the impossible we’ll might be able to explain things even by proving them physically or mathematically.

The particular project is focused on alterted-vision capabilities for blind people. The idea is the following: By-passing the complete neural responses of the damaged optic nerves in order to have a building platform to create enhanced vision capabilities. We know that our brain sends signals into our optic nerves in order for us to receive and see the light spectrum which by it’s own gives us the ability to understand colors, shapes etc. Imagine a technique which we could capture that signal and project it to us using a bionic vision receiver. Theoretically we could see because our damaged optic nerve and so the eye would be replaced with an artificial version despite the damaged one. The description is the following: “Giving enhanced vision to a blind man”.

I’m sure that there are many ethics to be considered and some of you with medical experience will find my idea somehow “hard-choped” and you’re probably right.  There are many obstacles, extremely risky and precise procedures and there is a blend of unfamilarity while conducting projects with bio-mechanical interfaces. Please let me know what you think. This is hardly the whole project. I’ve written about 50 more pages of derivations and structural difficulties.

Best Regards

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Posted: 01 November 2015 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Bishop - 01 November 2015 06:01 AM

Hello everyone,

I was doing a lot of thinking lately (among other things) and a lot of ideas was “scratching” my front door. One of them was Project ES (designation given by me). So, you’re probably wondering what’s that or what do I even mean by ES = EyeSight. Through fringe science we’ve been taught that science is only limited by our imagination. If we open our mind to the impossible we’ll might be able to explain things even by proving them physically or mathematically.

The particular project is focused on alterted-vision capabilities for blind people. The idea is the following: By-passing the complete neural responses of the damaged optic nerves in order to have a building platform to create enhanced vision capabilities. We know that our brain sends signals into our optic nerves in order for us to receive and see the light spectrum which by it’s own gives us the ability to understand colors, shapes etc. Imagine a technique which we could capture that signal and project it to us using a bionic vision receiver. Theoretically we could see because our damaged optic nerve and so the eye would be replaced with an artificial version despite the damaged one. The description is the following: “Giving enhanced vision to a blind man”.

I’m sure that there are many ethics to be considered and some of you with medical experience will find my idea somehow “hard-choped” and you’re probably right.  There are many obstacles, extremely risky and precise procedures and there is a blend of unfamilarity while conducting projects with bio-mechanical interfaces. Please let me know what you think. This is hardly the whole project. I’ve written about 50 more pages of derivations and structural difficulties.

Best Regards

I think you’d need a medical degree with a specialty in eye surgery to figure the feasibility of this. Meanwhile, you might talk to an eye surgeon or a medical university.

[ Edited: 02 November 2015 03:08 AM by LoisL ]
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[color=red“Nothing is so good as it seems beforehand.”
― George Eliot, Silas Marner[/color]

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