Reporting Chiropractors
Posted: 21 January 2016 07:31 PM   [ Ignore ]
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A few years ago I went to Mexico.  A few years ago I was also very credulous.  I asked my chiropractor what he thought about vaccination recommendations before traveling.  He had a negative view and instead offered to “boost” my immune system by treating what my body “wanted” to treat using a technique called NAET.  This treatment involves odd concepts borrowed from acupuncture and applied kinesiology.  In short this was a double-whammy of quackery.  First I was recommended to NOT get vaccinated and second to use a bogus treatment.  What is troubling is that both of these bad recommendations could have dangerous consequences.  On other occasions I would ask what he thought about vaccines for my child, and he recommended against it.  He even told me about the autism “link” with vaccines.  To this day my wife is still wary of vaccines partly because of these bad ideas.  I don’t feel it is right for someone to be spreading this type of misinformation that could end up having dire consequences.  Is there any way to report this?  What can be done about this?

More on NAET:
http://www.chirobase.org/06DD/naet.html

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Posted: 22 January 2016 10:07 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Hang in there for a response, blackorwat. I don’t know what to tell you, but there are others who check this category, regularly, who may have a relevant response for you.

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As a fabrication of our own consciousness, our assignations of meaning are no less “real”, but since humans and the fabrications of our consciousness are routinely fraught with error, it makes sense, to me, to, sometimes, question such fabrications.

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Posted: 22 January 2016 12:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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What a doctor can or can’t say in the course of their clinical practice is a bit complicated and I suspect the same applies to chiropractors.

In medicine there is a reluctance to censor or impose guidelines on physician speech because medicine is not black and white. While there are some things which would clearly be incorrect advice (ignore your ruptured appendix and it will get better) and others which are completely non-controversial (the benefits of vaccines far outweigh any small risk) a lot of medicine exists in a grey area where there may be more than one valid opinion about the best approach. Medicine is an evolving field in which we constantly test and search for better ways to do things so often there are competing approaches until a single best approach is defined.

For this reason physicians are loath to allow some appointed or even elected officials censor what they can say.

When it comes to chiropractic things may be a little different. The government has essentially decided to grant a license to something which is based entirely on pseudoscience so in a sense its a case of buyer beware. Most of what a chiropractor tells their patients is nonsense so its not surprising that their advice about vaccines would be based on equally faulty reasoning.  Asking a chiropractor for advice about vaccines is like asking a palm reader for their advice on how to build a space probe. You have to put at least some of the responsibility on the person for asking a question of someone who is not an authority on the subject. On the other hand the government and the chiropractic profession deserve some of the blame as well for pretending that they are medical doctors and misleading the public.

You may have some grounds for filing a complaint with the state board of professional misconduct. You could rightfully complain that this chiropractor was practicing medicine without a license or practicing outside his area of expertise. Beyond that there is probably not much you can do unless some harm resulted from his bad advice.

[ Edited: 22 January 2016 12:09 PM by macgyver ]
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Posted: 22 January 2016 12:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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The problem is that I cannot pinpoint definite harm in this case.  What is frustrating is that there is a potential for harm as this could cause more people to not get vaccinated or to make bad decisions when dealing with their allergies.  Somebody could potentially think they were “treated” with NAET and have a severe, life-threatening reaction when they try that food again.  It didn’t happen to me, but it has happened and could happen to other people.

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Posted: 22 January 2016 04:15 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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blackorwat - 22 January 2016 12:16 PM

The problem is that I cannot pinpoint definite harm in this case.  What is frustrating is that there is a potential for harm as this could cause more people to not get vaccinated or to make bad decisions when dealing with their allergies.  Somebody could potentially think they were “treated” with NAET and have a severe, life-threatening reaction when they try that food again.  It didn’t happen to me, but it has happened and could happen to other people.

Someone does not have to be injured in order for an individual to file a complaint with the office of professional misconduct. There simply needs to be an incident where-in a professional does something that is a violation of the professional standards of that particular profession. I am not sure this qualifies but you could explore that.

My comment about harm was referring to a civil claim. Since there was no direct harm there would be no basis for a claim.

I’m not a lawyer. My advice is simply from the perspective of a medical professional, but I would start with the office of professional misconduct in your state if you really want to do something. Otherwise maybe you would best be served by educating others in your family and friends circle so they understand that chiropractors should not be relied upon when you want reliable medical advice.

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Posted: 22 January 2016 05:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’ll keep that in mind.  Thanks for the advice!

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Posted: 23 January 2016 12:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Several years ago I was attending a computer show in Las Vegas and there was a chiropractor show in the same building, I wandered into a chiropractic exhibit with several long folding tables covered with paper back books and framed plaques.  Standing next to 2 chiropractors I hear one say to the other as he held up a book and the corresponding plaque, “I didn’t know we could cure this”.

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Posted: 04 April 2016 08:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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I hear all these hideous things about Chiropractors - and I would certainly never go to one for internal medical issues.
But, the thing is, when it comes to straightening out my back when it gets tweaked - I’ve had excellent experiences.
Couple years ago I gave a physical therapist a try (in fact I think it was at the urging of some of you good folks right here)
but I was rather unimpressed and him wanting me to get on the forever treatment plan did nothing to instill trust -
though in fairness I did get a few good stretching exercises from the dude. 
So every few years I seem find myself back at the Chiropractors to do his thing on that lower disk issue of mine -
and presto, a couple visits and I’m good to go.
No longer Mr. Gimp.
I do have one rule, no neck cracking, and they have always been quite accommodating.

signed unrepentant sporadic Chiropractor patient.

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Posted: 05 April 2016 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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citizenschallenge.pm - 04 April 2016 08:35 PM

I hear all these hideous things about Chiropractors - and I would certainly never go to one for internal medical issues.
But, the thing is, when it comes to straightening out my back when it gets tweaked - I’ve had excellent experiences.
Couple years ago I gave a physical therapist a try (in fact I think it was at the urging of some of you good folks right here)
but I was rather unimpressed and him wanting me to get on the forever treatment plan did nothing to instill trust -
though in fairness I did get a few good stretching exercises from the dude. 
So every few years I seem find myself back at the Chiropractors to do his thing on that lower disk issue of mine -
and presto, a couple visits and I’m good to go.
No longer Mr. Gimp.
I do have one rule, no neck cracking, and they have always been quite accommodating.

signed unrepentant sporadic Chiropractor patient.

I also went to a chiropractor for several years.  The main help I got was also for lower back issues.  Actually there are a good amount of studies supporting spinal manipulation for lower back pain.  But that is about as far as it goes.  The real issue is that they tend to spread misinformation about medicine, vaccines, and nutrition.  In addition many chiropractors also perform dubious treatments like acupuncture and energy medicine.  In addition they claim that chiropractic care is more than just a spinal manipulation for lower back pain.  Continued visits are recommended for preventing disease and keeping the immune system functioning well.  So-called “subluxations” are considered to be the root of disease.  And on and on…

To me this is the real reason why chiropractors are problematic.  For more resources here are some articles from a retired chiropractor who doesn’t support all the woo-claims of typical chiropractors:  https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/author/sam-homola/

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Posted: 05 April 2016 02:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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By any other name witch doctors are still witch doctors.  If you want to waste your money, try the lotto.

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Posted: 05 April 2016 02:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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By any name, witch doctors are still witch doctors.  If you wish to waste your money, try the lotto.

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Posted: 05 April 2016 02:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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deros - 05 April 2016 02:21 PM

By any name, witch doctors are still witch doctors.  If you wish to waste your money, try the lotto.

By the way there are legitimate doctors out there that can give help in this area (perhaps a DO) and even perform spinal manipulations if necessary.  I don’t see much need in going to a chiropractor specifically. 

This is what I have found in general in alternative medicine.  Usually there is someone out there that has a more science-based approach.  Sometimes your primary care physician isn’t the right person, but you can usually find a good specialist instead of going the woo route.

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Posted: 07 April 2016 08:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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blackorwat - 05 April 2016 12:03 PM

I also went to a chiropractor for several years.  The main help I got was also for lower back issues.  Actually there are a good amount of studies supporting spinal manipulation for lower back pain.  But that is about as far as it goes. 


The real issue is that they tend to spread misinformation about medicine, vaccines, and nutrition.  In addition many chiropractors also perform dubious treatments like acupuncture and energy medicine.  In addition they claim that chiropractic care is more than just a spinal manipulation for lower back pain.  Continued visits are recommended for preventing disease and keeping the immune system functioning well.  So-called “subluxations” are considered to be the root of disease.  And on and on…
To me this is the real reason why chiropractors are problematic.  For more resources here are some articles from a retired chiropractor who doesn’t support all the woo-claims of typical chiropractors:  https://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/author/sam-homola/

I don’t support the woo-claims either.  That was the whole point I was making, is that I find it a shame reasonable practitioners who keep it within the limits of science, skeletal manipulation, have to live under the burden of the broad brushed condemnation.

Choose your physicians and health guides with care.

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Posted: 25 April 2016 10:14 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Many years ago I taught metal shop in a Jr. HS and some of the students started calling me Iron Man, (long before the movie).  Several years after I had quit teaching, I was changing engines in my pickup truck and put my Sacroiliac out of joint.  So I went to a Chiropractor to have it adjusted, and I felt much better after, It didn’t hurt but I had to be more careful not to put it out of joint again.  The Chiropractor’s name was Dr. Blacksmith, and I thought it was amusing that the Iron Man went to a Blacksmith to get fixed.

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