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Posted: 24 March 2016 09:32 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Anything but Humble: Holy Man’s Cure-All Found to Be Toxic
BY MEGHAN HAMILTON • 16 MARCH 2016
http://thehumanist.com/news/international/anything-humble-holy-mans-cure-found-toxic

… On March 4 the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation aired on The Fifth Estate (their “premier investigative program”) a story about widespread poisoning by religious “healers.” In the episode titled “True Believers,” host Mark Kelley investigates a trend of religious healing that requires the sick to ingest a solution of chlorine dioxide numerous times a day with the promise that they will be cured of whatever ails them. The solution, called the Miracle Mineral Supplement or MMS for short, is essentially a mixture of bleach and water to be taken every hour for a certain number of days depending on the specific ailment.

According to Jim Humble, creator of the MMS treatment program and founder of the Genesis II Church of Health and Healing, the treatment will cure everything from AIDS to Ebola to the common cold. Humble (can that name be real?) claims he’s been sent to earth from a “Planet of the Gods” in the Andromeda galaxy on a mining mission, at which point he discovered the miracle cure. In order to have access to his healing potion, followers pay a membership fee of $35. The treatment was first advertised to poor families in Haiti and the Dominican Republic as a low-cost solution to their medical needs. ...

Yeah, sometimes the prospect of human extinction doesn’t just seem inevitable, but sword of cosmic justice in action.

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Posted: 26 March 2016 04:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I think I will stay with my old standby Wild Turkey.  It won’t cure a damn thing but take more than a couple of shots and you will forget what ails you.

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Posted: 01 April 2016 10:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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I just ran across this article and was astounded why Garlic is not used more in Medicine, and especially in the treatment of staph, such as MRSA.
There was a time Garlic was considered Medicine, but for some reason (bad breath?) it was dropped as a true medicinal plant.

Read this and as some 80 % of all people come in contact with MRSA (and other harmful microbes) carriers it would seem that docters should recommend this old proven medicine to EVERYONE in their daily diet.

Grey Duck Garlic, Phillips hardneck garlic by bird
Phillips-hardneck-garlic-sits-by-bird.jpg

Picture: Phillips garlic bulbs, lovely to look at, delicious to eat and deadly to MRSA and food poisoning microbes!

http://greyduckgarlic.com/Garlic_Treats_MRSA.html

[ Edited: 02 April 2016 09:29 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 02 April 2016 08:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Write4U - 01 April 2016 10:22 PM

I just ran across this article and was astounded why Garlic is not used more in Medicine, and especially in the treatment of staph, such as MRSA.
There was a time Garlic was considered Medicine, but for some reason (bad breath?) it was dropped as a true medicinal plant.

Read this and as some 80 % of all people are MRSA (and other harmful microbial) carriers it would seem that docters should recommend this old proven medicine to EVERYONE in their daily diet.

Grey Duck Garlic, Phillips hardneck garlic by bird
Phillips-hardneck-garlic-sits-by-bird.jpg

Picture: Phillips garlic bulbs, lovely to look at, delicious to eat and deadly to MRSA and food poisoning microbes!

http://greyduckgarlic.com/Garlic_Treats_MRSA.html

If everyone ate it, no one would object.

Lois

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Posted: 02 April 2016 10:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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I first read about this BS a couple years ago. It’s right up there with black salve (a.k.a. Cansema) in terms of “WTF is wrong with people?”

For some extra credit fun, do an image search for eschars.

P.S.
I tried including a link to the wiki on black salve, but the stupid board kept thinking it was spam so I had to drop it. Just look it up on your own.

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Posted: 02 April 2016 05:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Dead Monky - 02 April 2016 10:35 AM

I first read about this BS a couple years ago. It’s right up there with black salve (a.k.a. Cansema) in terms of “WTF is wrong with people?”

For some extra credit fun, do an image search for eschars.

Why don’t you do some more research on the properties of garlic.

P.S.
I tried including a link to the wiki on black salve, but the stupid board kept thinking it was spam so I had to drop it. Just look it up on your own.

I did before I posted this. You know me well enough to know that I am very skeptical about new-age lotions and potions. And tell me where I mentioned Black Salve?

The fact is that garlic has been used EFFECTIVELY for thousands of years.

Ok, I’ll help you out. The most active ingredient which can be extracted from garlic is *allicin*.

What Is Allicin?
Allicin is the most powerful medicinal compound derived from garlic and provides the greatest reputed health benefits.
Allicin does not occur in “ordinary” garlic, it is produced when garlic is finely chopped or crushed. The finer the chopping and the more intensive the crushing, the more allicin is generated and the stronger the medicinal effect.

The technically minded might be interested in the chemistry of allicin.
http://www.garlic-central.com/allicin-chemistry.html

As well as having antibiotic properties, allicin is an excellent anti-fungal and garlic preparations have been used in folk medicine to treat skin infections such as athlete’s foot. Be cautious: too much contact with crushed garlic can result in skin blistering. You should also be aware that a few people are allergic to garlic. Garlic is powerful and needs to be treated with respect - see the warnings page.

http://www.garlic-central.com/allicin.html

p.s. some 70 % of all modern medicine was originally distilled from naturally occurring plants, bark, and leaves.

Would you say that the effects of Sativa or the Coca leaf are imagined? The allicin in Garlic may well be as potent, but for a different use. It is good to be skeptical, but don’t throw out the baby with the wash water.

[ Edited: 02 April 2016 06:11 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 02 April 2016 06:58 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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LoisL - 02 April 2016 08:43 AM
Write4U - 01 April 2016 10:22 PM

I just ran across this article and was astounded why Garlic is not used more in Medicine, and especially in the treatment of staph, such as MRSA.
There was a time Garlic was considered Medicine, but for some reason (bad breath?) it was dropped as a true medicinal plant.

Read this and as some 80 % of all people are MRSA (and other harmful microbial) carriers it would seem that docters should recommend this old proven medicine to EVERYONE in their daily diet.

Grey Duck Garlic, Phillips hardneck garlic by bird
Phillips-hardneck-garlic-sits-by-bird.jpg

Picture: Phillips garlic bulbs, lovely to look at, delicious to eat and deadly to MRSA and food poisoning microbes!

http://greyduckgarlic.com/Garlic_Treats_MRSA.html

If everyone ate it, no one would object. Lois

At one time, everyone did.  In fact the first *recorded* labor strike was over a cut-back in the daily garlic ration given to workers on the pyramids (yes, that long ago). The pharaoh’s scribe duly recorded this in his records.

http://www.dulcerodrigues.info/historia/uk/historia_first_strike_uk.html

[ Edited: 02 April 2016 07:01 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 02 April 2016 11:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Uh, Write, you do realize I was comparing MMS to black salve, not garlic, right?

[ Edited: 03 April 2016 02:14 AM by Dead Monky ]
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Posted: 03 April 2016 02:06 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Dead Monky - 02 April 2016 11:54 PM

Uh, Write, you do realize I was comparing MMS to black slave, not garlic, right?

  (???)

I’ll take that as an apology for the “BS” I was spouting. Garlic IS a recognized plant with *effective* medicinal properties. It is currently under study for its various potential benefits.

The one requirement (and problem) for maximum potency is that it must be used raw and be prepared immediately before use, which makes any *stored* potions ineffective. The effective *compound* is known as (Allicin)

Allicin

Structural formula of R-allicin
Ball and stick model of R-allicin

Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Allicin is an organosulfur compound obtained from garlic, a species in the family Alliaceae.[1] It was first isolated and studied in the laboratory by Chester J. Cavallito and John Hays Bailey in 1944.[2][3] When fresh garlic is chopped or crushed, the enzyme alliinase converts alliin into allicin, which is responsible for the aroma of fresh garlic.[4] The allicin generated is very unstable and quickly changes into a series of other sulfur-containing compounds such as diallyl disulfide.[5] It is under preliminary research for its potential to have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral or antiprotozoal activity.[6] Allicin is garlic’s defense mechanism against attacks by pests.

300px-R-allicin-3D-balls.png

In laboratory studies, allicin has been found to have numerous antimicrobial properties, and has been studied in relation to both its effects and its biochemical interactions.[26] One potential application is in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an increasingly prevalent concern in hospitals. A screening of allicin against 30 strains of MRSA found antimicrobial activity, including against strains resistant to other chemical agents.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allicin

[ Edited: 03 April 2016 03:01 AM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 03 April 2016 02:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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I know garlic is useful medicinally. It’s pretty heavily abused by the woo peddlers too, but at least it’s generally harmless. Unlike black salve and MMS.

Also, I fixed my typo. LOL Oops.

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Posted: 04 April 2016 05:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Should I be careful about chopping and crushing garlic as a seasoning?  I don’t want to be randomly administering an antibiotic.

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Posted: 04 April 2016 07:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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TimB - 04 April 2016 05:32 PM

Should I be careful about chopping and crushing garlic as a seasoning?  I don’t want to be randomly administering an antibiotic.

I am not that knowledgeable, but I am sure there are recommended uses (recipes) available from reliable sources. But I did read that eating garlic in moderate amounts on a regular basis is beneficial (not harmful) for improving or maintaining general health.

You’d have to do some research on which of the claimed benefits are true or doubtful.

I did read some people are allergic, and also that allicin is a powerul substance and should be treated with respect. 

BTW, you can tell the presence and strength of allicin by the pungence of the garlic odor. Its the allicin that causes the smell, but also indicates that it sheds molecules at a great rate and has a short effective lifespan, before it breaks down to non antibiotic molecules.

It might be an answer to your question, but my knowledge of garlic is at about the same level as most people have about hemp.

p.s. Gilroy,  CA.  is considered the garlic capital of the US. It might be a good lead for research.

[ Edited: 04 April 2016 08:01 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 05 April 2016 05:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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There is some research investigating garlic and garlic-derived compounds for potential medicinal effects, but I think,  w4u, the evidence is a lot less compelling than you suggest. There are plenty of negative findings and only a handful of possible positive results. The claim that “garlic has been used EFFECTIVELY for thousands of years” is also pretty dubious. For one thing, in the absence of scientific research for most of those years, we have only anecdote to suggest this,  and the same kinds of anecdotal evidence would support the same claim for bloodletting, prayer,  and virtually every other traditional folk remedy. History is not a reliable guide to which plant-based remedies are effective and which aren’t. There is nothing wrong with investigating such things, but they often fail to live up to this kind of claim.


Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr. 2013;53(7):670-81. doi: 10.1080/10408398.2010.537000.

Garlic in clinical practice: an evidence-based overview.

Li L1, Sun T, Tian J, Yang K, Yi K, Zhang P.

 

Author information

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:

Garlic has been widely used in clinical practice, and there were many systematic reviews (SRs) describing its effects. But none reviewed the clinical utility comprehensively, so we aimed to evaluate its effects from every aspect of its effects.

METHODS:

We comprehensively searched medical electronic databases, asked the experts in this field, along with reference tracking, and manual searching. We included all kinds of SRs, including Cochrane SRs and non-Cochrane SRs. Two authors independently selected articles for relevant SRs, and extracted data of included SRs, resolved differences by consultation with a third reviewer.

RESULTS:

We described nine SRs about garlic. Available evidence showed that garlic can reduce blood pressure (BP) in hypertensive patients and patients with elevated systolic BP (SBP), but not in normotensive subjects. Evidence about the effects of garlic on lipid parameters was contentious, so we cannot make a decision whether garlic is effective enough for reducing total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TAG), and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). As evidence was very limited and insufficient, relations between garlic intake and reduced risks of all kinds of cancers, antiglycemic and antithrombotic effects of garlic, the effects of garlic on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality were unclear. Garlic as a preventative or treatment option for the common cold or peripheral arterial occlusive disease or pre-eclampsia and its complications could not be recommended, as only one relatively small trial evaluated the effects separately.

CONCLUSIONS:

Garlic might be effective in some areas of clinical practice, but the evidence levels were low, so further researches should be well designed using rigorous method to avoid potential biases.

Garlic for the prevention of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients.

Stabler SN1, Tejani AM, Huynh F, Fowkes C.

 

Author information

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Garlic is widely used by patients for its blood pressure lowering effects. A meta-analysis published in 2008 concluded that garlic consumption lowers blood pressure in hypertensive and normotensive patients. Therefore, it is important to review the currently available evidence to determine whether garlic may also have a beneficial role in the reduction of cardiovascular events and mortality rates in patients with hypertension.

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether the use of garlic as monotherapy, in hypertensive patients, lowers the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality compared to placebo.

SEARCH METHODS:

A systematic search for trials was conducted in the Cochrane Hypertension Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, AGRICOLA, AMED, and CINAHL up to November 2011. A hand search of reference lists of identified reviews was conducted. Experts in the area were also contacted to identify trials not found in the electronic search. Clinicaltrials.gov was searched for ongoing trials.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

Randomized, placebo-controlled trials of any garlic preparation versus placebo for the treatment of hypertension were included.

DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:

Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed trial quality using the risk of bias tool. Data synthesis and analysis was performed using RevMan 5.

MAIN RESULTS:

The search identified two randomized controlled trials for inclusion. One trial included 47 hypertensive patients and showed that garlic significantly reduces mean supine systolic blood pressure by 12 mmHg (95% CI 0.56 to 23.44 mmHg, p=0.04) and mean supine diastolic blood pressure by 9 mmHg (95% CI 2.49 to 15.51 mmHg, p=0.007) versus placebo. The authors state that garlic was “free from side effects” and that no serious side effects were reported. There were 3 cases “where a slight smell of garlic was noted.“The second trial could not be meta-analysed as they did not report the number of people randomized to each treatment group. They did report that 200 mg of garlic powder given three times daily, in addition to hydrochlorothiazide-triamterene baseline therapy, produced a mean reduction of systolic blood pressure by 10-11 mmHg and of diastolic blood pressure by 6-8 mmHg versus placebo.Neither trial reported clinical outcomes and insufficient data was provided on adverse events.

AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS:

There is insufficient evidence to determine if garlic provides a therapeutic advantage versus placebo in terms of reducing the risk of mortality and cardiovascular morbidity in patients diagnosed with hypertension. There is also insufficient evidence to determine the difference in withdrawals due to adverse events between patients treated with garlic or placebo.Based on 2 trials in 87 hypertensive patients, it appears that garlic reduces mean supine systolic and diastolic blood pressure by approximately 10-12 mmHg and 6-9 mmHg, respectively, over and above the effect of placebo but the confidence intervals for these effect estimates are not precise and this difference in blood pressure reduction falls within the known variability in blood pressure measurements. This makes it difficult to determine the true impact of garlic on lowering blood pressure.

 

Mol Nutr Food Res. 2007 Nov;51(11):1382-5.

Clinical effectiveness of garlic (Allium sativum).

Pittler MH1, Ernst E.

 

Author information

 

Abstract

The objective of this review is to update and assess the clinical evidence based on rigorous trials of the effectiveness of garlic (A. sativum). Systematic searches were carried out in Medline, Embase, Amed, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Natural Standard, and the Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database (search date December 2006). Our own files, the bibliographies of relevant papers and the contents pages of all issues of the review journal FACT were searched for further studies. No language restrictions were imposed. To be included, trials were required to state that they were randomized and double blind. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of garlic were included if based on the results of randomized, double-blind trials. The literature searches identified six relevant systematic reviews and meta-analysis and double-blind randomized trials (RCT) that were published subsequently. These relate to cancer, common cold, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, peripheral arterial disease and pre-eclampsia. The evidence based on rigorous clinical trials of garlic is not convincing. For hypercholesterolemia, the reported effects are small and may therefore not be of clinical relevance. For reducing blood pressure, few studies are available and the reported effects are too small to be clinically meaningful. For all other conditions not enough data are available for clinical recommendations.

J Nutr. 2016 Feb;146(2):389S-96S. doi: 10.3945/jn.114.202192. Epub 2016 Jan 13.

Garlic Lowers Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Individuals, Regulates Serum Cholesterol, and Stimulates Immunity: An Updated Meta-analysis and Review.

Ried K1.

 

Author information

 

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Garlic has been shown to have cardiovascular protective and immunomodulatory properties.

OBJECTIVES:

We updated a previous meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood pressure and reviewed the effect of garlic on cholesterol and immunity.

METHODS:

We searched the Medline database for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1955 and December 2013 on the effect of garlic preparations on blood pressure. In addition, we reviewed the effect of garlic on cholesterol and immunity.

RESULTS:

Our updated meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood pressure, which included 20 trials with 970 participants, showed a mean ± SE decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 5.1 ± 2.2 mm Hg (P < 0.001) and a mean ± SE decrease in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 2.5 ± 1.6 mm Hg (P < 0.002) compared with placebo. Subgroup analysis of trials in hypertensive subjects (SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mm Hg) at baseline revealed a larger significant reduction in SBP of 8.7 ± 2.2 mm Hg (P < 0.001; n = 10) and in DBP of 6.1 ± 1.3 mm Hg (P < 0.001; n = 6). A previously published meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood lipids, which included 39 primary RCTs and 2300 adults treated for a minimum of 2 wk, suggested garlic to be effective in reducing total and LDL cholesterol by 10% if taken for >2 mo by individuals with slightly elevated concentrations [e.g., total cholesterol >200 mg/dL (>5.5 mmol/L)]. Garlic has immunomodulating effects by increasing macrophage activity, natural killer cells, and the production of T and B cells. Clinical trials have shown garlic to significantly reduce the number, duration, and severity of upper respiratory infections.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our review suggests that garlic supplements have the potential to lower blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, to regulate slightly elevated cholesterol concentrations, and to stimulate the immune system. Garlic supplements are highly tolerated and may be considered as a complementary treatment option for hypertension, slightly elevated cholesterol, and stimulation of immunity. Future long-term trials are needed to elucidate the effect of garlic on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

Public Health Nutr. 2016 Feb;19(2):308-17. doi: 10.1017/S1368980015001263. Epub 2015 May 6.

Garlic consumption and colorectal cancer risk in man: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Chiavarini M1, Minelli L1, Fabiani R2.

 

Author information

 


Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Colorectal cancer shows large incidence variations worldwide that have been attributed to different dietary factors. We conducted a meta-analysis on the relationship between garlic consumption and colorectal cancer risk.

DESIGN:

We systematically reviewed publications obtained by searching ISI Web of Knowledge, MEDLINE and EMBASE literature databases. We extracted the risk estimate of the highest and the lowest reported categories of intake from each study and conducted meta-analysis using a random-effects model.

RESULTS:

The pooled analysis of all fourteen studies, seven cohort and seven case-control, indicated that garlic consumption was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR=0·93; 95 % CI 0·82, 1·06, P=0·281; I 2=83·6 %, P≤0·001). Separate analyses on the basis of cancer sites and sex also revealed no statistically significant effects on cancer risk. However, when separately analysed on the basis of study type, we found that garlic was associated with an approximately 37 % reduction in colorectal cancer risk in the case-control studies (combined risk estimate=0·63, 95 % CI 0·48, 0·82, P=0·001; I 2=75·6 %, P≤0·001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our results suggest that consumption of garlic is not associated with a reduced colorectal cancer risk.

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Posted: 05 April 2016 10:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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Thank you for that informative post.  Obviously Garlic (Allicin) is not a cure-all as claimed by commercial sellers of garlic derivatives.

However , in those reports I did notice some positive results and importantly, that garlic is safe to use (except for allergic persons) as a *health promoting* supplement.

But we got a little bit off track from my first post, which specifically addressed the antibiotic properties of the Allicin which can be extracted from garlic. And in particular as a natural defense against the MRSA staph (the great hospital problem), especially when dealing with the more antibiotic resistant strains.

The article I quoted mentions research in that specific aerea. To your knowledge is there any new information from that research?

[ Edited: 05 April 2016 10:19 PM by Write4U ]
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Posted: 06 April 2016 12:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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It would be relatively easy to establish whether people who eat garlic regularly are in any better health than those who do not. We know there are people who have eaten garlic throughout their lives and those who never eat it. This is not a difficult comparison to make.

Lois

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Posted: 07 April 2016 03:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Write4U - 05 April 2016 10:10 PM

Thank you for that informative post.  Obviously Garlic (Allicin) is not a cure-all as claimed by commercial sellers of garlic derivatives.

However , in those reports I did notice some positive results and importantly, that garlic is safe to use (except for allergic persons) as a *health promoting* supplement.

But we got a little bit off track from my first post, which specifically addressed the antibiotic properties of the Allicin which can be extracted from garlic. And in particular as a natural defense against the MRSA staph (the great hospital problem), especially when dealing with the more antibiotic resistant strains.

The article I quoted mentions research in that specific aerea. To your knowledge is there any new information from that research?

Only two of the studies referenced in the article you mentioned address the use of Garlic/Allisin. The others simply discuss the problems with MRSA and the difficulty of treating some MRSA infections. Of the two articles that studied garlic extracts one looked at the effects of the substances in inhibiting growth on an agar plate and the other was a mouse study. There do not appear to be any double blinded placebo controlled trials in humans that I could find.

I would be extremely careful about eating extra garlic or taking any garlic supplements in a battle against MRSA for several reasons.

1) There is no good evidence that these substances are effective in treating MRSA in human beings
2) Even if these substances are effective there is no information addressing the appropriate dose, form, or preparation required to be effective.
3) If the dose of these substances required to treat an infection is higher than the normal culinary amount or in a form that is not commonly consumed, its possible there may be side effects which have yet to be discovered
4) As with all antimicrobial agents there is the risk of resistance. Garlic isn’t magic. Its benefits would abide by the same evolutionary rules as all other antimicrobials. It is possible and very likely that people who consume certain garlic products regularly in an effort to “improve health” may induce resistance to these agents among the organisms of their microbiome. As is common, these organisms may then pass that resistance on to pathogenic organisms making them harder to treat and even more dangerous.

Any effort to use garlic products to treat infections outside of a controlled trial would be premature at this point and possibly dangerous.

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