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cascading consequences in the puppy world.
Posted: 09 December 2016 09:25 AM   [ Ignore ]
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Oh lordie, looking for dog people who might have some advice, perhaps I’m just looking for commiseration.

Our dog (close to 3yr.) is used to lots of room to roam and run, since we live on 40 acres of varied rural landscape and on her many walks she spends
easily 90% of the time off the leash.  We keep it with us and we do reign her in now and then.  Then she turns out to be amazingly good about the leash. 
If she’s pissed she’ll attack the leash as she’s being led.

Four days ago doc removed a bladder stone that looked like a rock of calcite off the beach, it fit on a quarter reaching multiple sides of the thing.  Really quite amazing example of the dance between biology and geology.

But the thing is the incision.  Two weeks of no strenuous activity, not running, no hanging out with her giant lover (Mischka, the Newfoundland) next door (too much rough housing). So she has to be leashed all the time on the walks these days.  This is a dog that can go from 0 to 35 in a second, and loves it.  Does the digestion lots of good too.  Day four and she’s had enough.  The walks don’t satisfy her, so she’s constantly wanting to keep walking or go out on another one.  Worst of all she’s now starting to get used to fighting the leash.  Not cool.  Not fun for her or us.

I make a point of never forcing her into the cabin, it’s always been of her own accord, worked great - today there was enough hemming and hawing at the front door I picked her up carried her in.  Ten more days of this   shock

I’m half tempted to put her on doggie downers, but then again . . .  long face

[ Edited: 09 December 2016 10:55 AM by citizenschallenge.pm ]
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Posted: 09 December 2016 02:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Benadryl

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Posted: 09 December 2016 06:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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DarronS - 09 December 2016 02:59 PM

Benadryl

  ohh

question

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Posted: 09 December 2016 08:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Our vet suggested this for Cooper when he had skin allergies this summer. Cut down on the itching and made him a bit less energetic. Worth a try.

Now that I think about it, Zirtec worked better. Depends upon the dog, I guess.

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Posted: 14 December 2016 10:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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DarronS - 09 December 2016 08:02 PM

Our vet suggested this for Cooper when he had skin allergies this summer. Cut down on the itching and made him a bit less energetic. Worth a try.

Now that I think about it, Zirtec worked better. Depends upon the dog, I guess.

Fortunately, didn’t have to go to extremes like that.

As for the constantly on her leash, the first days are the hardest.
Sometimes I think it’s going splendid, then I realize that’s because I’m following her,
and holy moly the places she’s leading me,
funny how different it is watching her circle everything and actually being on the leash circling with her, and under branches, and its real warm so the ground is spongie and it’s important to walk with a bit of care, so’s not to rip up the ground too much.
 
It’s rather mind expanding   tongue wink

When I need to b-line it, and she can turn into a bit of a bitch.
YeaH like all daddy’s there’s a day you gotta reckon with the reality that your little girl ain’t a virgin anymore.
I’m reconciled with leash tugging as what its going to be.

We’ve had her in her harness collar so there’s no harsh janking and I’m not into that anyways,
but steady pressure and willpower, that’s another game.  Although the challenge is to make her take the first steps often as possible. 

So I’ll stand a lot, “reason” with her, cajole her, encourage her, beg even and when I’ve had enough, I bring out the drill sergeant routine - OK huphupgogogo, volume continues to do wonders when needed.  And she’s smart, if I’m on a mission and I’m not into f’n around, she’s knows and falls in.  It all starts with a genuine respect and a bit of heart felt affections.

I’m trying to do self-training with the “heel” and real tight leash at my side, but that only work so long.  Only five more days to go.
 
Fortunately the incision never irritated her, thus those impossible collars were hardly used and that’s made it easier.  Particularly at night since she sleeps under our bed.  First day we did the collar barricaded the bed, but that sucked.  Next night we took a long sleeved turtle neck and slipped it over her hind legs, taped it above the joint, but her tail through the neck and pulled it up around her collar where we safety pin it.  First time she tried walking in it, it was hilarious, little hops, but adapted fast.  Did that for four nights, then a late night or something and we skipped it - all was fine.  Haven’t put it on again.  Once in a while she’ll lick it, but I figure that’s probably good so long as she doesn’t get to chewing on the sutures, a we distract her and all’s good.

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Posted: 15 December 2016 07:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Fixing leach tugging is easy. Get a front clip harness and a leach no longer than five feet. Bring treats and work on having her walk beside you. When she gets it right reared her its a treat. When she gets to the end of the leach and tugs turn around and walk the other direction, then reward her with a treat when she gets beside you. You may spend 30 minutes in your yard the first time, but after a few sessions she’ll catch on. The front clip harness and fairly short cash are keys. Never use a retractable harness; they just teach the dog to get to the end of the harness and pull.

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Posted: 16 December 2016 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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DarronS - 15 December 2016 07:33 AM

Fixing leach tugging is easy. Get a front clip harness and a leach no longer than five feet. Bring treats and work on having her walk beside you. When she gets it right reared her its a treat. When she gets to the end of the leach and tugs turn around and walk the other direction, then reward her with a treat when she gets beside you. You may spend 30 minutes in your yard the first time, but after a few sessions she’ll catch on. The front clip harness and fairly short cash are keys. Never use a retractable harness; they just teach the dog to get to the end of the harness and pull.

Yeah, she’s basically got that short leash, in fact our leash has clasps at both ends and the handgrip is on a ring that slides along the length, so that you can hook onto two points of her harness collar.  Love it, makes it very versatile.

I been using treats the way you mention, but she’s a scamp, somedays she loves them, others times forget it.
Other days I forget them.
I mean even bacon she’ll refuse at times and devour at other times.
Also, that approach requires a certain acceptance of regimentation that doesn’t work for either of us.
So we muddle through.
Has it’s ups and downs for sure, though for the most part it’s been a nice trajectory of increasing communication and cooperation.
I have the feeling it’ll be a long beautiful friendship.

Yeah the retractable collar,  LOL , we bought one at first.  Then went to picnic and used it as a line for her, only for a few minutes.  Did I mention Maddy has sharp teeth.  Big waste of twenty, thirty bucks, never saw a need to get another.

Oh and I love it, “spend 30 minutes in your yard”, have I told you about our “yard”  tongue wink

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Posted: 22 December 2016 08:45 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Okay, as they say: this too shall pass.  Couple days ago the stitches came out, vet said all is fine, no restrictions.

We’d been waiting a long time for this walk.  With leash unhooked and wrapped up an in hand, my gal, Maddy and I took off.  I made sure to bring my phone/camera for her celebratory release, that is, when she realized she wasn’t on the leash.  Well dang, she just walked between us nonchalant as can be.  No moment of discovery when she started prancing (the way she does when excited), but after a couple hundred yards she started roaming ahead, running back to touch base and then going off again. 

Sliding into it nice and easy.  The rabbits even cooperated.  Near the end of our walk, she spotted one and took after it,  this rabbit was obliging and ran under a shed.  It was a short distance away and Maddy took off at a moderate run, rather than the 0 to 30mph in a split second she’s capable, and there was an endpoint, rather than acres of brush - I’d just as soon not see her all out sprint for a few more days.

So in the long run I believe it was a good training for all of us - because it is important for her to get used to the leash and nothing but being forced to do it will get me to make that effort.  And now I gotta run, she’s getting pissed at me and wants to go on another walk.  Now the question is who own’s who. I always thought it was the owner that was supposed to be barking out commands   tongue rolleye

[ Edited: 22 December 2016 08:52 AM by citizenschallenge.pm ]
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Posted: 22 December 2016 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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It’s a cooperative partnership. The trick is teaching the dog what you want it to do. Dogs are very amenable to learning, they just need consistent direction.

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Posted: 24 December 2016 06:48 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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DarronS - 22 December 2016 09:17 AM

It’s a cooperative partnership. The trick is teaching the dog what you want it to do. Dogs are very amenable to learning, they just need consistent direction.

Oh dear after that walk I had a nice response all typed out and somehow, well being in a frazzled rush to get to the next obligation may have had something to do with it, I closed the page before posting.  shut eye

Consistency is important.  Although now I’m off on a tangent - that makes me think of a talk I had many years ago with a friend that was of the hard scrabble, beans, lard, peanut butter and white bread life style.  They smacked their kids somewhat regularly.  He took the time to explain to me that’s how he and his wife were raised.  They were not abusive parents, but they came from the world were if you don’t smack your kid once in a day they don’t think they’re loved.  He made the point that what the really important thing was, was consistency.  Have your rules stick to them, and show your love, which they did.

Hearing this you may think the guy was a real creep, but the thing is they never hit their kids out of rage.  I know they weren’t parents that were prone to flipping out so I tend to believe him.  Also the kids seemed pretty cool and adjusted and keeping up on their school work, so hey who am I to judge.  Way more on the ball than some of these computer-game-heads I interact with these days.

I know growing up in my family, your solid German/American household, we kids got our lickings (sporadically rather than daily).  But, the thing is, we knew why we were getting them and inside we knew we had it coming.  But, again it came from pure deep love, we never once doubted our parents loved us - and I realize today we’ve gone to the hypersensitive and many parents are downright scared to set rules and discipline.  Then again it’s much, much, much easier these days - shove a TV and computer screen in front of your toddler and the machine will take over the parenting.

Man am I glad I grew up before this era and a slightly blistered ass when I had it coming, was a price well worth paying, for the life style, experiences and lessons we(me ‘n my sibs) knew growing up.  Oh, that style had nothing to do with lots of money and all the crap it can buy for you - we were actually pretty tight all the time, that way.  It had to do
with living life, having the wonders of the world pointed out and appreciated.  Stuff like that. 

All that stuff that’s missing in these days when directionless avarice seems to have captured everyone’s heart.

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Posted: 24 December 2016 06:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Next time I’ll get back to Maddy and our story.  wink

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Posted: 08 January 2017 11:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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DarronS - 09 December 2016 02:59 PM

Benadryl

Funny that, this evening P. showed me a FaceBook thing about someone’s dog got into something or other, head developed weird bumps all over,
sent out a FB plea, someone say try Benadryl, she did, followed by pictures of happy doggie, with smooth scalp.

I’ve also been thinking about her finickiness with treats.  It’s actually quite simple I reckon.  She’s back to walking off the line,
that is chasing down scent trails.
What does a real dog want to do 90% of it’s waking time > sniff around for interesting stuff to eat.

Most dogs are in confined environments - stuck with stealing trash or it’s fed them.
But, here with 20 acres north, of relatively healthy scrubland and 20 acres south including easily 10 riparian (± river {creek} and surrounding wet zone) landscape.
Coyotes and Bobcats and all sorts of other things are out there hunting, so there are always tidbits left laying around and Maddy loves sniffing them out.
Almost as much as she likes chasing rabbits.

I’m thinking of it now because I had funny keep away game going this afternoon with some chewed up rabbit leg bone, that I lobbed into the top branches of a Juniper,
but the dang thing fell back out a couple times and she got to it before me.  Though in the end I did get it and placed up high in a crotch of a limb.  My usual spot for such tidbits.
Of course I realize for the few that I get out of her mouth, there are probably half a dozen she gets away with.
Monthly dewormer, for sure, marked on the calendar even.  cheese


Oh yeah another funny thing that’s happened a couple times. 
I’ll be at a neighbor’s or something and pet their dog, then later I try to give Maddy a snack and she’s too busy sniffing out the other dog to give a fig for the treat.

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Posted: 10 January 2017 08:37 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Aren’t dogs great? My puppy has stolen my heart, despite doing her best to destroy our couch.

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Posted: 28 March 2017 07:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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DarronS - 10 January 2017 08:37 AM

Aren’t dogs great? My puppy has stolen my heart, despite doing her best to destroy our couch.

If it weren’t for the time she demands it would be absolutely wonderful.  Given I’m stuck with CC the wannabe writer with already limited writing-time, it’s a challenge (no pun intended).  Mine to win or lose.  More winning than losing Thanks-be.  Which brings me to a triumph I want to share. 

Perhaps even a helpful hint for others stuck with force feeding pills to dogs.

I’ve had another little epiphany of sorts, the kind of thing that makes life worth living. 
You old timers will remember my stories about helping administer a number of Pills to a 120 lb Newfoundland “pup” for three weeks or so - crazy to think its been two years.  Not being a dog person, by the end I felt good about it and my learning curve and the fact that the dog never did hold any grudge.

By and by, we get a young Shepard mix weighing in at a full grown 42 lbs (our pretty near grown neighbor is weighing in at 180/190 lbs these days.).  Well our little lady had her medical problems, a blatter-stone easily the size of a large marble.  Afterwards it was back to administering meds.  Now it’s my pup needing the meds and I’ll admit, being an empathetic kinda guy it’s a different experience.  After all this is my new shadow, my little girlie who sits at the top of the drive waiting expectantly when I come home, and who will curl up at my feet in the evening.   

Now I’m supposed to feed her pills she hates.  First I tried hiding the food and tricking her. Sweet got this figured out, … for a couple days.  But, this is a weeks long regiment and it took her a couple days to get wise and recognize when I was coming with the pills.  It occurred to me I should stop associated the PB with meds, since its one of the few snacks she’s always into.

So I started using butter, not without flashbacks to my youthful innocent viewing of the Last Tango in Paris, oh what innocents we all start out as, but back to my dog.  I’m feeling less and less comfortable with shoving these things down her throat, but it has to be done.  Fortunately we were done, big relief.

Well dang, despite diet, she’s with another bladder stone.  How it can happen in a matter of months is beyond me, but so it is.  Point being back to shoving meds down her throat.  Fortunately, she’s 40 ish not 200 ish which helps.  Still, I kept trying to be less invasive.  By and by its evolved. 

Now still with the butter, no more hiding, I tell her, okay sorry girlie I know it sucks, lets get it over with.  I noticed I didn’t need to pry both jaws apart.  Well maybe pry to open a little but then all I need is grab the top jaw/snout and gently pull back, her bottom jaw can only raise so much and her mouth opens wide.

Lo and behold, I get a gravity shot straight to the base of her tongue.  I barely put my hand in her mouth any more.  Aim well, let go, the greased up pill hits the base of her tongue with a little momentum, then I bring up her bottom jaw to close her mouth and stroke bottom of jaw and throat tenderly.  smile 

I mean it is so cool, lickety-split, down it goes.  Rather than shoving my hand down her throat I hold her head up.  It’s truly been one of those little triumphs in life with all the satisfaction rush of winning some fancy prize.  Well, for me ’n my dog at least. 

Almost as good as when you’ve successfully potty-trained your kid in a matter of days. {Timing, communication and never ever tell them to “wait” or “hold it” - till it clicks, at least} - but that’s a different story isn’t it and I’m done with this one.

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Posted: 29 March 2017 08:04 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Cool story. I might have to try that next time I give our dogs meds. They don’t mind most of them, but a couple of pills they’ll eat whatever enticement we use and spit the pills on the floor. Wish I’d known about this trick when we had our Shepherd/Husky mix. BTW, we now have duct tape on two spots of our couch.

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Posted: 29 March 2017 08:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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DarronS - 29 March 2017 08:04 AM

BTW, we now have duct tape on two spots of our couch.

Have I got the blog for you. http://craftwhack.com/cool-duct-tape-ideas/tongue wink

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