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Anyone else here have an interest in Cryonics?
Posted: 15 April 2017 12:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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When a person (or even a non human animal) is restored to functioning life and the ability to think after death, I’ll think about it. Meanwhile I have too many other things to focus on. I’m not going to waste my time on pure speculation. That’s one reason I’m an atheist.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 08:40 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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I’ll just park this at the top of the page, still curious . . .

Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 15 April 2017 07:27 AM

What always baffles me about such musings, Cryonics, colonizing Mars, a world of autonomous cars (jezz like now we’re becoming too lazy to drive our own cars.), etc. -
all these wonderful sci-fi worlds struggling to come to fruition in the next few decades and more.
 
To me it all seems so disconnected from the fact that we are creatures of the biosphere of this planet and a healthy biosphere
is the thing that provides our life support system - and that we are destroying that biosphere at breakneck speed.
Like who would want to wake up in a century to see what we’ve wrought?

Or do people actually believe the Earth will remain pretty much the same wonderful livable place we’ve known for the past decades and before?

Or is it all simply a communal Wile-e coyote syndrome?

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Posted: 16 April 2017 08:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 15 April 2017 07:27 AM

What always baffles me about such musings, Cryonics, colonizing Mars, a world of autonomous cars (jezz like now we’re becoming too lazy to drive our own cars.), etc. -
all these wonderful sci-fi worlds struggling to come to fruition in the next few decades and more.
 
To me it all seems so disconnected from the fact that we are creatures of the biosphere of this planet and a healthy biosphere
is the thing that provides our life support system - and that we are destroying that biosphere at breakneck speed.
Like who would want to wake up in a century to see what we’ve wrought.

Or do people actually believe the Earth will remain pretty much the same wonderful livable place we’ve known for the past decades and before?

Or is it all simply a communal Wile-e coyote syndrome?

Who is more likely to be a good steward of the biosphere, someone with a lifespan limited to 76 years or so or someone with an indefinite lifespan?

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Posted: 16 April 2017 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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Freeposity - 16 April 2017 08:50 AM

Who is more likely to be a good steward of the biosphere, someone with a lifespan limited to 76 years or so or someone with an indefinite lifespan?

Well when I look at the types who are really into superduper life extensions they seem rather focused on themselves and figuring out now to extend their own particular fun rides, to have much room for other concerns.
Maybe I’m a bit twisted by my minutes starring at Grandpa’s shed in Nederland Colorado and mediating on the man wrapped in dry ice.
http://www.legendsofamerica.com/co-frozendeadguy.html. Can’t say we don’t have fun in Colorado.  tongue wink


Besides, you avoided my question.
Have you spent any time looking at trends and thinking about what our physical planet will look like in 75 years?

Try to imagine the massive complex infrastructure that’s needed to sustain our high tech industries?
Massive complex infrastructures, long supply chains, far flung mining/extraction/refining networks.
Stuff that doesn’t lend itself well to a world full of environmental upheavals accompanied by erratic destructively intense weather patterns.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 06:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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LoisL - 15 April 2017 12:24 PM

When a person (or even a non human animal) is restored to functioning life and the ability to think after death, I’ll think about it. Meanwhile I have too many other things to focus on. I’m not going to waste my time on pure speculation. That’s one reason I’m an atheist.

Well there’s the rub. Once you’ve perfected the technique, it will no longer be needed. Cryonics is definitely speculative(but not pure speculation) but it is also a bridge technology. It’s only meant to hopefully bridge the time gap between now and ubiquitous and comprehensive life extension technology.

This is an interesting objection that I hear a lot and I must confess I don’t really get it. It’s similar to saying, I’m not going to try this experimental drug when I’m dying of cancer and there is no other alternative. While there are a lot of variables involved, there is no reason in physics why it can’t work. In over 25 years of looking into this I have yet to find a violation of physics that would prevent this from working. Every other possible failure seems to fall into the category of social failure. Either failure of a cryonics organization or a failure of society in general. Well, there’s also the possibility of global extinction caused by a gamma ray burst, an asteroid or other astronomical event but we always have that sword of Damocles hanging over our heads.

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Posted: 16 April 2017 07:17 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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Freeposity - 16 April 2017 06:13 PM

...  comprehensive life extension technology.

There’s always such an optimistic sales-pitch about the thing.  What would a human get out of “comprehensive life extension” ?
My mom’s over ninety and wants to die.

I would too,  all of her generation family and friends are gone, Christmas and no old friends or family to send a letter to, and the changes in the world that have left her behind, etc., etc.
It’s seems like a weird Monkey’s Paw sort of plot.  Who a person is, is intimately tied to their body and moment they are living, and the circumstance they are living in.  Freeze the body in box for who know’s how long and for what, to be thawed out and set loose again in a new world.  I can’t think of a more bizarre terrifying roulette game with insanity.  Why not just settle the inevitable and died and get it over with when the times comes.

I don’t know but I wonder what it’s like for folks who’ve been in comas for extended periods, what it’s like coming back.

Freeposity - 16 April 2017 06:13 PM

I’m not going to waste my time on pure speculation. (Don’t kid yourself, of course it’s pure speculation.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that.) That’s one reason I’m an atheist.  Every other possible failure seems to fall into the category of social failure. Either failure of a cryonics organization or a failure of society in general. Well, there’s also the possibility of global extinction caused by a gamma ray burst, an asteroid or other astronomical event but we always have that sword of Damocles hanging over our heads.

Interesting that what’s unfolding upon our physical planet seems as remote a gamma ray burst.  Interesting indeed.  Care to expound on that?

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Posted: 17 April 2017 04:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 15 April 2017 07:27 AM

What always baffles me about such musings, Cryonics, colonizing Mars, a world of autonomous cars (jezz like now we’re becoming too lazy to drive our own cars.), etc. -
all these wonderful sci-fi worlds struggling to come to fruition in the next few decades and more.
 
To me it all seems so disconnected from the fact that we are creatures of the biosphere of this planet and a healthy biosphere
is the thing that provides our life support system - and that we are destroying that biosphere at breakneck speed.
Like who would want to wake up in a century to see what we’ve wrought.

Or do people actually believe the Earth will remain pretty much the same wonderful livable place we’ve known for the past decades and before?

Or is it all simply a communal Wile-e coyote syndrome?

Maybe we wouldn’t want to know what we have wrought.

I think all this comes from people who can’t bear the thought of actually dying.

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Posted: 17 April 2017 10:12 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 16 April 2017 08:40 AM

I’ll just park this at the top of the page, still curious . . .

Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 15 April 2017 07:27 AM

What always baffles me about such musings, Cryonics, colonizing Mars, a world of autonomous cars (jezz like now we’re becoming too lazy to drive our own cars.), etc. -
all these wonderful sci-fi worlds struggling to come to fruition in the next few decades and more.
 
To me it all seems so disconnected from the fact that we are creatures of the biosphere of this planet and a healthy biosphere
is the thing that provides our life support system - and that we are destroying that biosphere at breakneck speed.
Like who would want to wake up in a century to see what we’ve wrought?

Or do people actually believe the Earth will remain pretty much the same wonderful livable place we’ve known for the past decades and before?

Or is it all simply a communal Wile-e coyote syndrome?

Its a runaway nerd mentality

[ Edited: 17 April 2017 10:19 PM by Beltane ]
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Posted: 17 April 2017 10:19 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Freeposity - 16 April 2017 08:50 AM
Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 15 April 2017 07:27 AM

What always baffles me about such musings, Cryonics, colonizing Mars, a world of autonomous cars (jezz like now we’re becoming too lazy to drive our own cars.), etc. -
all these wonderful sci-fi worlds struggling to come to fruition in the next few decades and more.
 
To me it all seems so disconnected from the fact that we are creatures of the biosphere of this planet and a healthy biosphere
is the thing that provides our life support system - and that we are destroying that biosphere at breakneck speed.
Like who would want to wake up in a century to see what we’ve wrought.

Or do people actually believe the Earth will remain pretty much the same wonderful livable place we’ve known for the past decades and before?

Or is it all simply a communal Wile-e coyote syndrome?

Who is more likely to be a good steward of the biosphere, someone with a lifespan limited to 76 years or so or someone with an indefinite lifespan?

The former may be better. If nothing else, they’ll have less time to degrade the environment.

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Posted: 18 April 2017 06:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Its a runaway nerd mentality

That’s about as substantive as a fart in a gale.

Guess the poster must not be aware of how our planet’s geophysics impacts our day to days.

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Posted: 18 April 2017 07:00 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 18 April 2017 06:24 AM

Its a runaway nerd mentality

That’s about as substantive as a fart in a gale.

That pretty well sums up my erything Beltane has posted since joining these forums.

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Posted: 18 April 2017 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 18 April 2017 06:24 AM

Its a runaway nerd mentality

That’s about as substantive as a fart in a gale.

Guess the poster must not be aware of how our planet’s geophysics impacts our day to days.

What do you mean? You asked what drives these sci-fi - like scenarios of escaping the biosphere.

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Posted: 18 April 2017 09:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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Beltane - 18 April 2017 08:15 AM
Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 18 April 2017 06:24 AM

Its a runaway nerd mentality

That’s about as substantive as a fart in a gale.

Guess the poster must not be aware of how our planet’s geophysics impacts our day to days.

What do you mean? You asked what drives these sci-fi - like scenarios of escaping the biosphere.

My bad.
Never was that good at riddles, specially when I’m off looking in another direction.

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Posted: 19 April 2017 10:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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Carl-Sagan - 13 April 2017 02:39 PM
VYAZMA - 13 April 2017 07:28 AM


We have enough people on the planet. There’s a perfectly good natural system of human reproduction and lifecycle in place.

In a way I feel like it addresses one of the biggest reasons why most people gravite towards religion, theoretically granting us eternal life.

I was once content with dying simply because it was a part of life and out of my control, so you learn to accept it.

But if there is an alternative you wouldn’t take it? You’re content with drifting into nothingness for eternity after death?

I didn’t realize we were being offered an alternative.

Lois

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Posted: 19 April 2017 10:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 16 April 2017 07:17 PM
Freeposity - 16 April 2017 06:13 PM

...  comprehensive life extension technology.

There’s always such an optimistic sales-pitch about the thing.  What would a human get out of “comprehensive life extension” ?
My mom’s over ninety and wants to die.

I would too,  all of her generation family and friends are gone, Christmas and no old friends or family to send a letter to, and the changes in the world that have left her behind, etc., etc.
It’s seems like a weird Monkey’s Paw sort of plot.  Who a person is, is intimately tied to their body and moment they are living, and the circumstance they are living in.  Freeze the body in box for who know’s how long and for what, to be thawed out and set loose again in a new world.  I can’t think of a more bizarre terrifying roulette game with insanity.  Why not just settle the inevitable and died and get it over with when the times comes.

I don’t know but I wonder what it’s like for folks who’ve been in comas for extended periods, what it’s like coming back.

Freeposity - 16 April 2017 06:13 PM

I’m not going to waste my time on pure speculation. (Don’t kid yourself, of course it’s pure speculation.  Not that there’s anything wrong with that.) That’s one reason I’m an atheist.  Every other possible failure seems to fall into the category of social failure. Either failure of a cryonics organization or a failure of society in general. Well, there’s also the possibility of global extinction caused by a gamma ray burst, an asteroid or other astronomical event but we always have that sword of Damocles hanging over our heads.

Interesting that what’s unfolding upon our physical planet seems as remote a gamma ray burst.  Interesting indeed.  Care to expound on that?

Imagine George Washington or Abraham Lincoln or Hitler being brought back to life in the 21st century. How would they cope? Most likely they’d be completely ignored once the novelty wears off.

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