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Eric Burton could paint it black
Posted: 08 May 2017 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Perceptions and perspectives and life’s a trip.
Now that I’ve stepped back from writing/blogging for a while, I spend more time lollygagging around YouTube looking for interesting history stuff, including music of my youth.

I remember as a preteen (<1968) in Chicago loving the hits by Eric Burton and the Animals
House of the Rising Sun,
We Gotta Get Outta This Place,
When I Was Young,
Monterey,
San Francisco Nights,
Paint it Black,

specially House of the Rising Sun, when no one was around I’d sing along giving it all the pre-pubescent soul I could muster.
When I Was Young made me think about how I wanted to grow up and escape.

Song after song by these Animals grabbed me back then, so much so that the past few days listening to their music
I get these memory flashes from those days of exploring Chicago in ever widening circles
with the Animals playing the soundtrack coming across the AM radio. 

Though I knew their music well, I never paid much attention to them or any band for that matter.  Poor boy too many other things to focus on.
Still for me his voice was very cool, it spoke of age and experience, one tough dude that had been around. 
Though I hadn’t given it much thought over the decades beyond the occasional song coming on the radio and it remaining as special and timeless as ever.

Then last week I came across a documentary

“Eric Burdon - The Animals And Beyond (Awesome Documentary)”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPUcvLMs36E

Learned all the things about the group that I had never gotten around to asking. 
Got to watch this voice that so mesmerized me.

Fascinating fun program, I mean this guy in his way is in a league with Freddie Mercury when it comes to power of his voice,
even if Eric’s is of a totally different character than Freddie’s, it’s still unique and solid and resonates with that magic something that few have and can’t be faked Mick.

It’s a cool documentary, though it was a trip realizing and it took a while to get over the fact that this voice that I’d built into some kind of mythical being turned out to be a pimple-faced teenager.  Amazing.  What a kid he must of been.  It’s funny even after moving to the SF Bay Area I never knew all that much about these bands I was listening to - later in life finally catching up on watching old videos of those old bands on stage - I sometimes think it’s just as well, that I mainly had a sonic familiarity the bands that moved me.

So guess my question -
What do you think looking back on the bands you loved as a kid?
How many of your favorites have survived the test of time?

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Posted: 09 May 2017 07:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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I’ll watch the video tonight when I have time. You should check out Chasing the Rising Sun: The Journey of an American Song by Ted Anthony. The story behind that song is fascinating, and Anthony is a gifted writer. I got so engrossed in the book I missed an astronomy club executive committee meeting.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0046LUM4S

And to answer your questions at the bottom: most of the bands I loved as a kid have withstood the test of time but there are a few exceptions. Tommy James & the Shondells were one of my favorites in my preteen years, but now I consider them an interesting but uninspiring pop band.

Edit: My wife’s favorite childhood band was The Monkees. I thought they were OK, but judged them by their television show and never paid much attention to their music. Looking back, they were a talented band held back by marketing influences. Some of their music is exactly as we remembered, good old Rock ‘n’ Roll. Some of it is much better than I remembered (mainly the stuff that never got airplay) and a few songs were dreck. Overall a much better band than credited in their day.

Out of all the cool bands I saw live in my youth the one that stands out the most is Quicksilver Messenger Service. I was always a fan, and they put on a great concert in late 1972. The audience was great and the band fed off their energy. Didn’t hurt that I got an ovation for landing a frisbee in one of the PA horns during intermission. I let on like I did it on purpose, but I was aiming for the roadie in the middle of the stage.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 08:16 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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What do you think looking back on the bands you loved as a kid?
How many of your favorites have survived the test of time?

My teen years were the 90s-00s so bands weren’t really big thing- rappers and pop stars were more popular, and none of them are still popular now. They influenced what’s going on right now, I suppose.

Surviving the test of time -  I don’t think that really exists. People will generally like the music they grew up with and the next generation will not. Nothing stays fresh.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 08:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Beltane - 09 May 2017 08:16 AM

What do you think looking back on the bands you loved as a kid?
How many of your favorites have survived the test of time?

My teen years were the 90s-00s so bands weren’t really big thing- rappers and pop stars were more popular, and none of them are still popular now. They influenced what’s going on right now, I suppose.

Surviving the test of time -  I don’t think that really exists. People will generally like the music they grew up with and the next generation will not. Nothing stays fresh.

I’m pretty sure Bach, Beethoven and Mozart died before anyone alive today was a child. Their music has survived the test of time, as will Chuck berry, The Beatles, etc. That crap from the 90s and 00s? Can’t think of anything mainstream worth considering.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 09:12 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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DarronS - 09 May 2017 08:27 AM

I’m pretty sure Bach, Beethoven and Mozart died before anyone alive today was a child. Their music has survived the test of time

Not really, unless you’re a kid forced into violin lessons. For a long time people associated themselves with classical music to appear cultured, but that attitude is dying out. Hardly anybody listens to classical for enjoyment.

as will Chuck berry, The Beatles, etc.

Doubtful. Future historians might listen to it to study the society that created and consumed it. That’s about it.

That crap from the 90s and 00s? Can’t think of anything mainstream worth considering.

“Get off my lawn you damn kids.”

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Posted: 09 May 2017 02:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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Judging by the number of sold out concerts at the Denver Symphony I’d say you’re wrong about classical music’s popularity. I suspect you’re also wrong about Chuck Berry and The Beatles but neither of us will live long enough to know for sure. By the way, I don’t mind kids playing on my lawn, but their music does suck. That isn’t age, most popular music sucks. The music of the 1960s and 1970s was an exception, but even then we had some dreck near the top of the charts.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 04:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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DarronS - 09 May 2017 08:27 AM

Their music has survived the test of time, as will Chuck Berry, ...

Yeah babe, hell his music can be heard beyond the solar system, talk about withstanding the test of time (and space)  tongue wink

Chuck Berry’s Music Is Traveling Through Interstellar Space
http://www.space.com/36136-chuck-berry-music-in-interstellar-space.html

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Posted: 09 May 2017 04:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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DarronS - 09 May 2017 02:53 PM

The music of the 1960s and 1970s was an exception, but even then we had some dreck near the top of the charts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lk-GJz7D1mo  LOL LOL LOL

“Get off my lawn you damn kids.”

During my short stint on the high school cross-country team we’d corner across this old Irish guy’s lawn.

He got to were he knew we were coming and he’d be waiting, literally shaking his fist then with his heavy Irish (or was it Scottish?) brogue
he added some lines to the above that made it all worth it for us punks.

I’ll put you where the birds can’t shit on ya! 
It was like a virus and spread through the entire track and field team. 
Those were the days my friend.

Sweet old guy.  I still love that line.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 04:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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DarronS - 09 May 2017 07:30 AM

I’ll watch the video tonight when I have time. You should check out Chasing the Rising Sun: The Journey of an American Song by Ted Anthony. The story behind that song is fascinating, and Anthony is a gifted writer. I got so engrossed in the book I missed an astronomy club executive committee meeting.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0046LUM4S

Dang, no audio version available.  Looks great, thanks for the tip, now I gotta get the book, but then the problem is finding the time to sit down and read it.
But I bet it’ll be a lot more fun that catching up on the news from Antarctica.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 05:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 09 May 2017 04:06 PM
DarronS - 09 May 2017 02:53 PM

The music of the 1960s and 1970s was an exception, but even then we had some dreck near the top of the charts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lk-GJz7D1mo  LOL LOL LOL

That is one. This is another.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wtJ1Gnh9wPU

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Posted: 09 May 2017 05:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 09 May 2017 04:33 PM
DarronS - 09 May 2017 07:30 AM

I’ll watch the video tonight when I have time. You should check out Chasing the Rising Sun: The Journey of an American Song by Ted Anthony. The story behind that song is fascinating, and Anthony is a gifted writer. I got so engrossed in the book I missed an astronomy club executive committee meeting.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0046LUM4S

Dang, no audio version available.  Looks great, thanks for the tip, now I gotta get the book, but then the problem is finding the time to sit down and read it.
But I bet it’ll be a lot more fun that catching up on the news from Antarctica.

I guarantee it. Anthony traced the roots of the song way back.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 06:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Every decade has had some great music that never gained widespread popularity. Here is an example from 1969. Cold Blood* from Oakland, CA.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y2mzaL_U1lc

*Kansas City had an excellent underground FM station when I was in high school.

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Posted: 09 May 2017 08:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Citizenschallenge-v.3 - 09 May 2017 04:04 PM
DarronS - 09 May 2017 08:27 AM

Their music has survived the test of time, as will Chuck Berry, ...

Yeah babe, hell his music can be heard beyond the solar system, talk about withstanding the test of time (and space)  tongue wink

Chuck Berry’s Music Is Traveling Through Interstellar Space
http://www.space.com/36136-chuck-berry-music-in-interstellar-space.html

If warlike aliens discover that they will definitely head to earth for a seek and destroy mission!

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Posted: 09 May 2017 08:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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DarronS - 09 May 2017 02:53 PM

Judging by the number of sold out concerts at the Denver Symphony I’d say you’re wrong about classical music’s popularity.

Guarantee it’s the same stodgy people going over and over again. That’s how it works. That music will never reach beyond it’s small fan base.

I suspect you’re also wrong about Chuck Berry and The Beatles but neither of us will live long enough to know for sure. By the way, I don’t mind kids playing on my lawn, but their music does suck. That isn’t age, most popular music sucks.

Your opinion.

Kids music doesn’t suck for them. And I’m right about the Beatles and Berry; maybe a few geeks will enjoy it in the future, but the most people won’t care about it. They’ll have a different type of music that resonates with them.

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Posted: 10 May 2017 08:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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Beltane - 09 May 2017 08:37 PM

Your opinion.

... And I’m right about the Beatles and Berry; maybe a few geeks will enjoy it in the future, but the most people won’t care about it.
They’ll have a different type of music that resonates with them.

Hmmm, now we got two different things going on.

Regarding the giants such as Beethoven, Mozart, Berry, Beatles, etc.,
we can’t get away from the fact that they have been infused into new music.
Thus even though one might not be aware that what they’re listening to contains components of past masters - doesn’t mean it’s not there.

Besides, seems that new generations are constantly rediscovering certain old music, it has a different appeal to them,
but it still makes their backbone move and fills their spirit with joy and even release - and it becomes apart of their life’s soundtrack in turn.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

As for Eric Burton, yeah he’s not universal like what the Beatle’s did, his strongest appeal is directed at the creatures of night and the grittier side of life.

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Posted: 10 May 2017 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Why has our little S.N. become so vindictive?
It allows me to second guess myself and place Beethoven in front of Mozart.
But I thinks that’s not right.  So I double check, dang Mozart b.1756 - Beethoven b.1770
I rush to correct my correction - and Mr. S.N. just laughs and laughs.

tongue wink

cool smile

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