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Examining the pretender’s meme “Don’t trust Scientific Consensus”
Posted: 29 August 2017 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 76 ]
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... And I was just trying to figure out what the heck AMH is try to say.  But then love riddles more than actual dialogue.

His follow up wasn’t much help.

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Posted: 29 August 2017 03:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 77 ]
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AMH - 29 August 2017 08:26 AM

For the purpose of the forum, I think of science as being involved in a process of formulating testable hypotheses (I hear echo’s of Karl Popper) about the natural world. Data are directly observable characters and measurements.  For the discussion of human origins the data set would include observations and measurements of skeletal remains, descriptions of sedimentary context, etc etc.

Actually systems science especially of our complex biosphere and Earth with its many interactions aren’t amenable to such a simplistic Popperian approach. 
Poppers notion may conform to chemistry and physics “table-top” experiments, but not for our living Earth.

Falsification: Was Karl Popper Wrong About Science?
https://www.acsh.org/news/2016/08/19/falsification-was-karl-popper-wrong-about-science

Popper’s views are highly influential. Indeed, few scientists would dispute the importance of falsifiability. But just how realistic is Popper’s spin on the scientific method? Does science actually advance in this way? In a paper nearly a decade old in the journal Foundations of Science, philosophy professor Sven Ove Hansson argues that Popper is wrong.

To make his case, Dr. Hansson selected 70 papers* from the journal Nature published in the year 2000. He asked a series of questions and classified the papers accordingly. His schema is shown below. (My explanations, which are additions to the original figure, are shown in red text.)
=============================

One of the answers to Edge.org’s question
“What scientific idea is ready for retirement”? is by physicist Sean Carroll.
Carroll takes on an idea from the philosophy of science that’s usually considered a given: falsification.
By Ashutosh Jogalekar on January 24, 2014
https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/the-curious-wavefunction/falsification-and-its-discontents/

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Posted: 29 August 2017 03:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 78 ]
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falsifiability-1024x984.jpg

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Posted: 30 August 2017 02:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 79 ]
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AMH - 27 August 2017 04:47 PM

This forum is an amazing tribute to our primitive uneducated errogant tribal mentality.

And where are you when someone tries to approach something constructively?

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