Confederate Statues Were Built To Further A ‘White Supremacist Future’
Posted: 21 August 2017 07:14 AM   [ Ignore ]
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In the early 1900s, states were enacting Jim Crow laws to disenfranchise black Americans. In the middle part of the century, the civil rights movement pushed back against that segregation.


James Grossman, the executive director of the American Historical Association, says that the increase in statues and monuments was clearly meant to send a message.

“These statues were meant to create legitimate garb for white supremacy,” Grossman said. “Why would you put a statue of Robert E. Lee or Stonewall Jackson in 1948 in Baltimore?”

Grossman was referencing the four statues that came down earlier this week in the city. After the violence in Charlottesville, Va., when a counterprotester was killed while demonstrating, and the action in Durham, N.C., where a crowd pulled down a Confederate statue themselves, the mayor of Baltimore ordered that city to remove its statues in the dead of night.

“They needed to come down,” said Mayor Catherine Pugh, according to The Baltimore Sun. “My concern is for the safety and security of our people. We moved as quickly as we could.”

Thousands of Marylanders fought in the Civil War, as NPR’s Bill Chappell noted, but nearly three times as many fought for the Union as for the Confederacy.


“Who erects a statue of former Confederate generals on the very heels of fighting and winning a war for democracy?” writes Dailey, in a piece for HuffPost, referencing the just-ended World War II. “People who want to send a message to black veterans, the Supreme Court, and the president of the United States, that’s who.”

Statues and monuments are often seen as long-standing, permanent fixtures, but such memorabilia take effort, planning and politics to get placed, especially on government property. In an interview with NPR, Dailey said it’s impossible to separate symbols of the Confederacy from the values of white supremacy. In comparing Robert E. Lee to Presidents George Washington and Thomas Jefferson on Tuesday, President Trump doesn’t seem to feel the same.

Dailey pointed to an 1861 speech by Alexander Stephens, who would go on to become vice president of the Confederacy.

“[Our new government’s] foundations are laid, its cornerstone rests, upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man,” Stevens said, in Savannah, Ga. “That slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition.”

To build Confederate statues, says Dailey, in public spaces, near government buildings, and especially in front of court houses, was a “power play” meant to intimidate those looking to come to the “seat of justice or the seat of the law.”


“And those monuments will endure and whatever is going around them will not.”

http://www.npr.org/2017/08/20/544266880/confederate-statues-were-built-to-further-a-white-supremacist-future

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Posted: 21 August 2017 07:23 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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To equate Robert E. Lee with Hitler would be lazy, and bad history. Hitler’s name is invoked too casually, and too often.

But since the white supremacists protesting the removal of Lee’s statue in Charlottesville brandished swastikas, and openly made the Nazi salute, the connection to 1930s Germany was invited by the marchers themselves.

Seeing the images of young men carrying torches and chanting was perhaps surreal in Washington, but among Berliners there was an added layer of disbelief. While President Trump was being criticized for not explicitly condemning the white nationalist groups responsible for Saturday’s violence, Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman called the march “absolutely repulsive” and denounced the “outrageous racism, anti-Semitism and hate in its most despicable form.”

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2017/08/16/543808019/the-view-of-charlottesville-from-berlin

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Posted: 21 August 2017 07:44 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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The United States Was Never Immune to Fascism. Not Then, Not Now.


It has never been more important to acknowledge the history of fascism and neo-fascism in America It has never been more important to acknowledge the history of fascism and neo-fascism in America

Although they remain fringe groups, Trump’s victory has given them new confidence. Never in history have they felt more empowered. Many of them saw his election as their victory. The chorus of support ranges from the American Nazi party supremo, Rocky Suhayda, who sees Trump as a “real opportunity”, to the white supremacist leader David Duke, who said he was “100% behind” Trump.

They cheered as he failed to mention Jews on Holocaust Remembrance Day. They cheered as he refused to condemn the Minnesota mosque attack. They cheered as he relativized the rightwing violence by blaming “all sides” after the murder in Charlottesville. It is perhaps the first time in American history that the racist far-right sees the elites in the White House as its allies.

Trump has long done little to distance himself from these groups. In fact, he has all too often shamelessly tapped into their discourses, using dog-whistles, and continues to maintain a tacit, though increasingly shaky, alliance with them.


http://portside.org/2017-08-20/united-states-was-never-immune-fascism-not-then-not-now

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Posted: 21 August 2017 02:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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kutyfk

LoisL - 21 August 2017 07:44 AM

The United States Was Never Immune to Fascism. Not Then, Not Now.
They cheered as he failed to mention Jews on Holocaust Remembrance Day. They cheered as he refused to condemn the Minnesota mosque attack. They cheered as he relativized the rightwing violence by blaming “all sides” after the murder in Charlottesville. It is perhaps the first time in American history that the racist far-right sees the elites in the White House as its allies.

Trump has long done little to distance himself from these groups. In fact, he has all too often shamelessly tapped into their discourses, using dog-whistles, and continues to maintain a tacit, though increasingly shaky, alliance with them.

http://portside. org/2017-08-20/united-states-was-never-immune-fascism-not-then-not-now

White nationalist and neo-fascist movements in the US have grown by 600% on social media, outperforming Isis…

More than a decade ago, the historian Robert Paxton, well versed in the long history of fascism and neo-fascism in America, warned in his important book The Anatomy of Fascism about the “catastrophic setbacks and polarization” which “the United States would have to suffer” if “these fringe groups” were “to find powerful allies and enter the mainstream” of American politics.

His words may turn out to be prophetic.

....lkjgktfr

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Posted: 21 August 2017 07:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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After the Murderous Attack in Charlottesville, It is Time For Lawmakers to Reject Bills Protecting Those Who Run Over Protesters Once and For All

By Chip Gibbons


Since January of this year, an anti-protest frenzy has engulfed state legislatures across the country with one lawmaker after another proposing legislation designed to intimidate those who dare exercise their right to assemble. Most of these bills have been pushed back by popular outrage.

These legislative attempts to thwart free assembly have taken a number of forms, but one of the most odious and notorious has been bills that would remove criminal and civil liability from drivers who kill and maim protesters “accidentally.”

The grotesque nature of these bills, and the fact that they are in essence a state sanctioning of violence against protesters, means that from their very first proposal they garnered media attention and widespread outrage. Last weekend Heather Heyers was murdered while protesting racism when a white supremacist ran over her with a car. Nineteen other individuals, also protesting against racism, were injured as a result of the white supremacist attack. As a result, these vile bills are once again the subject of heightened media scrutiny.

Those who proposed these laws are under fire. While at least one of these bills is no longer being pushed in light of Charlottesville, it’s chief sponsor is nonetheless claiming it is “ intellectually dishonest and a gross mischaracterization to portray North Carolina House Bill 330 as a protection measure for the act of violence that occurred in Charlottesville this past weekend.” He’s arguing that his bill was only meant to protect those who unintentionally hit demonstrators.

Of course, not a single one of these bills come in response to innocent drivers accidentally striking demonstrators. They are not merely solutions to a non-existent problem, they are clearly designed to convey a contempt for protesters. After all, why else would you single out drivers who unintentionally strike protesters for special immunity, while still leaving drivers who strike other pedestrians, intentionally or unintentionally, subject to potential liability?

A contempt for dissent manifested in a stated desire to run over and kill protesters is not a new phenomenon. In 1968, George Wallace, of “segregation today, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever” infamy,” boasted “If any demonstrator ever lays down in front of my car, it’ll be the last car he’ll ever lay down in front of.” An article from Slate documented the shockingly high number of law enforcement officers who have gotten in trouble for publicly expressing a desire to run over protesters (Combined Law Enforcement Associations of Texas endorsed a bill removing liability for running over protesters). An entire website exists just to document “social media threats and aspirations to kill or maim Black Lives Matter protestors with vehicles.”  A search for the phrases “no one cares about your protest” or “All Lives Splatter” reveals disgusting memes depicting cars running over protesters. There are even window decals available for you to place on your automobile, though many websites appear to have removed them.

These calvier celebrations of the murder of a human being are shocking, but their targets are sadly revealing. There are certainly those who hate dissent so much that wish death upon those who engage in democracy. The first of these bills, however, was in direct response to the protests at Standing Rock. “All Lives Splatter,” like much of the other bills, is a clear attack on Black Lives Matter protests.

Both Standing Rock and Black Lives Matter involved communities who have been subject to racisms and dehumanization standing up for their most basic of human rights. For individuals to respond these demands that we recognize their basic humanity with gleeful wishes for violent death illustrates why they are necessary in the first place. 

Lawmakers who push bills removing liability for “accidentally” running over political protesters do so with a wink and a nudge. Responding to a nonexistent problem, these bills are about communicating a murderous disdain for political protests. While given the serious nature of the charges against Heather Heyer’s murderer, it is unlikely that bill protecting those who unintentionally run over protesters would have offered him much protection. It is also impossible to deny what message singling out those who injure or kill protesters for special protections sends. These bills should never have been proposed in the first place, but in light of the shocking murder of Heather Heyer it is urgent that they be repudiated and shelved for good.

https://rightsanddissent.org/news/murderous-attack-charlottesville-time-lawmakers-reject-bills-protecting-run-protesters/?eType=EmailBlastContent&eId=260a33de-b1d4-49ce-96ca-32fe4d7fe70c

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Posted: 22 August 2017 07:28 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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The reason for this is that we are in a fascist state now.  By definition our government is a fascist regime.  We have been fooled into believing that freedom of choice is freedom, but they are the ones that propose the limited choices.  You are free to answer the question “what do I want from life” as long as the answer is A,B,C, or D they have provided.  These monuments should be torn down because they celebrate hate, but to A lot of people they also symbolize rebellion and insurgency.  It is obviously not the best correlation, but nearly everyone who rebels against the government is demonized.  That is why southerners that aren’t necessarily rascist are fighting this, they hate the government.  They are right to hate it, but the confederacy is a “false idol”; a failed, morally bankrupt movement that never should have been. 
  Please live by your principles, not your feelings.  Confederate monuments violate the basic principles our country is founded on and that of mankind as a whole if we wish to progress.

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Posted: 25 August 2017 09:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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I don’t disagree with the OP at all.  What you’ve got to understand though is that down here in the South, people don’t understand all that.  Young people are taught that the “War of Northern Aggression” was about States Rights, that slavery was just a pretext by President Lincoln to keep the British from coming in on the Confederate side.  The fact that even Northern cities like Boston have statues to Confederate soldiers is considered proof.  So all they see is men they were taught to worship as heroes being spat on and disrespected.  They will never change their minds because that’s the history they’d rather believe.

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Posted: 25 August 2017 12:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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Advocatus - 25 August 2017 09:17 AM

I don’t disagree with the OP at all.  What you’ve got to understand though is that down here in the South, people don’t understand all that.  Young people are taught that the “War of Northern Aggression” was about States Rights, that slavery was just a pretext by President Lincoln to keep the British from coming in on the Confederate side.  The fact that even Northern cities like Boston have statues to Confederate soldiers is considered proof.  So all they see is men they were taught to worship as heroes being spat on and disrespected.  They will never change their minds because that’s the history they’d rather believe.

In that they’re just like true believing theists. They can’t think, they can only absorb and reflect their politocal indoctrination, so they recast history to support their indoctrination. Some of them really believe it had nothing to do with slavery. I wonder what they think set off the South’s decision to secede and what was the reason behind th so-called Northern aggression? Wars are not fought for no reason. So what was the reason behind secession and the Civil War, again?

Lois

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Posted: 26 August 2017 06:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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LoisL - 25 August 2017 12:42 PM

They can’t think, they can only absorb and reflect their politocal indoctrination, so they recast history to support their indoctrination.

That’s a little harsh.  It’s only human nature.  Which would you rather believe, that your ancestors were scumbags or that they were heroic patriots taking a stand against the overwhelming might of an evil central government which was determined to trample the rights of individual states?  I’m not saying it’s right; it’s just something we have to take into account.  They don’t understand why their heroes are suddenly being thrown away like yesterday’s dishwater.

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Posted: 26 August 2017 09:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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The “Rebel’’ flag had a resurgence of popularity that coincided with the advancement and mass availability of technology.  As the world became more interconnected, those that wished to resist this new wave found they could not escape it.  Communities formed in the trough of this wave, while at the same time southern culture was being popularized to a new generation via television, music, and merchandise.  A younger generation of southerners that did not resist technology became disillusioned with their dependence on this technology and perceived loss of their roots.  They began overcompensating for their lack of southern or “country” authenticity./  This trend spread very quickly and merchandisers and corporations were there to capitalize on it.  Confederate battle flag merchandise sales grew exponentially.  It is also pertinent to note that all the big retailers, those that may publicly condemn these trends, greatly profited from this as well( Amazon, Wal-Mart, E-bay, Sears). 

  I can not speak to the whole country, but this is has been my personal experience in the town I grew up in and the people I know.  These people are a product of their environment and the internet has provided the latest generation of southerners with their environment.  Between that and the generation before them looking down on them for “letting go of their roots”, the sentiment that had formed in the trough behind that wave of progress has now climbed to the crest of the next wave.  Now it seems that “race” is a major problem again after it was thought to have been dealt with in the 90’s and early 2000’s.  I think this is a different race problem than the previous one, this one has less to do with civil rights as it has to do with political currency.  The mood seems to be turning to that of 1920’s Germany and it seems history is intent on repeating itself. 

  Our leaders are allowing Donald Trump to destroy the last remnant of unity this nation has.  We must not let ourselves be drawn into civil war, but still fight for justice and righteousness.  We just have to find a balance between righteous and supercilious behavior.  This is only a commentary, nothing I am presenting is more than allegorical or opinion.  I didn’t mention social media because I am extremely biased; I nearly hate it and did not want to drone on and on.

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Posted: 26 August 2017 10:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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WaylonCash - 26 August 2017 09:34 AM

The “Rebel’’ flag had a resurgence of popularity that coincided with the advancement and mass availability of technology.  As the world became more interconnected, those that wished to resist this new wave found they could not escape it.    Communities formed in the trough of this wave, while at the same time southern culture was being popularized to a new generation via television, music, and merchandise.  A younger generation of southerners that did not resist technology became disillusioned with their dependence on this technology and perceived loss of their roots.  They began overcompensating for their lack of southern or “country” authenticity./  This trend spread very quickly and merchandisers and corporations were there to capitalize on it.  Confederate battle flag merchandise sales grew exponentially.  It is also pertinent to note that all the big retailers, those that may publicly condemn these trends, greatly profited from this as well( Amazon, Wal-Mart, E-bay, Sears). 

  I can not speak to the whole country, but this is has been my personal experience in the town I grew up in and the people I know.  These people are a product of their environment and the internet has provided the latest generation of southerners with their environment.  Between that and the generation before them looking down on them for “letting go of their roots”, the sentiment that had formed in the trough behind that wave of progress has now climbed to the crest of the next wave.  Now it seems that “race” is a major problem again after it was thought to have been dealt with in the 90’s and early 2000’s. I think this is a different race problem than the previous one, this one has less to do with civil rights as it has to do with political currency.  The mood seems to be turning to that of 1920’s Germany and it seems history is intent on repeating itself.

  Our leaders are allowing Donald Trump to destroy the last remnant of unity this nation has.  We must not let ourselves be drawn into civil war, but still fight for justice and righteousness.  We just have to find a balance between righteous and supercilious behavior. This is only a commentary, nothing I am presenting is more than allegorical or opinion.  I didn’t mention social media because I am extremely biased; I nearly hate it and did not want to drone on and on.

A worthy comment though.  I’m impressed that you turned to the 20s when Hilter was at the very early stages.  I usage go straight for the 30s when things were already gaining huge and apparently unstoppable momentum.  Must be the optimist in you.  I understand I’m a bit too pessimistic and I’ll admit, I’ve been hearted by some of the resistance that appears to be showing up more and more.  Last few days I’ve had to sit through TV viewing (we aren’t connected at home so never watch) and was nicely surprised by some of the commercials pointed efforts to defend diversity and ‘racial chill’ and I’m also starting to find out that many, perhaps most, of the younger generation really are over the bigotry and racial profiling and reactionary-ism.  Sort of like the guys who’ve finally figured out their own sexuality issues, and thereby becoming solid individuals who really couldn’t care less about the behaviors or proclivities of other consenting adults.

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Posted: 26 August 2017 10:33 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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Although I remain optimistic, I cited the 20’s because that’s when the ball started rolling. ]  After reading your comment I think that with the much more prevalent and varied methods of communication we have now, we are probably considerably further along this timeline.

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Posted: 28 August 2017 02:30 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Advocatus - 26 August 2017 06:58 AM
LoisL - 25 August 2017 12:42 PM

They can’t think, they can only absorb and reflect their politocal indoctrination, so they recast history to support their indoctrination.

That’s a little harsh.  It’s only human nature.  Which would you rather believe, that your ancestors were scumbags or that they were heroic patriots taking a stand against the overwhelming might of an evil central government which was determined to trample the rights of individual states?  I’m not saying it’s right; it’s just something we have to take into account.  They don’t understand why their heroes are suddenly being thrown away like yesterday’s dishwater.

Then they’re even more stupid than I thought. I can hardly believe than anyone raised in the second half of the 20th Century or 21st Century in the United states could possibly be that thick.

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Posted: 28 August 2017 06:55 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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WaylonCash - 26 August 2017 09:34 AM

The “Rebel’’ flag had a resurgence of popularity that coincided with the advancement and mass availability of technology.  As the world became more interconnected, those that wished to resist this new wave found they could not escape it.  Communities formed in the trough of this wave, while at the same time southern culture was being popularized to a new generation via television, music, and merchandise.  A younger generation of southerners that did not resist technology became disillusioned with their dependence on this technology and perceived loss of their roots.  They began overcompensating for their lack of southern or “country” authenticity./  This trend spread very quickly and merchandisers and corporations were there to capitalize on it.  Confederate battle flag merchandise sales grew exponentially.  It is also pertinent to note that all the big retailers, those that may publicly condemn these trends, greatly profited from this as well( Amazon, Wal-Mart, E-bay, Sears).

That’s quite true.  The flag of my state, Georgia, used to have the state seal in a blue canton and a Confederate battle flag in the fly (it had been added in the 50’s actually; the original flag adopted in the 20’s simply had two red stripes separated by a white stripe).  In 2003, under pressure of public opinion, the legislature changed it, originally to a plain blue flag with the state seal (which nobody liked), then to the old 20’s version with the state seal in the canton and two red stripes separated by a white stripe.  (The galling thing to be personally is that AFTER this flag was voted on in great fanfare, somebody tacked on an amendment to add “In God We Trust”.  Originally it was in gold letters across the white stripe, which anybody could have told them made it next to impossible to see!  Then they amended it again to move the motto underneath the state seal.)  However, 14 years later there is still a roaring trade of old Georgia state flags with the Confederate flag in the fly.  Some people just don’t want to change.

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Posted: 28 August 2017 08:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I don’t think they were looking to the future when they created the myth of the “noble” southern struggle and tried to turn Confederate generals and leaders into heroes, they were merely enforcing the status quo at the time which was mostly centered around the power of white Anglo-Saxon Protestants.

And sure there is some freedom in America… as long as you don’t directly challenge the power of the status quo. Then your days are numbered like in any society. Humanity has evolved some very effective and permanent ways to remove those who upset the balance too much.

Entire religions are based around this message.

Christianity which on the surface is supposed to be about love, forgiveness and gods love for mankind - after all he gave us his only son to die a horrible death for our “sins” - is really a theater production on what happens to those who actually try and assert values that challenge the power of the few that sit at the top. Why do you think that the most emphasized and celebrated element of Christianity is the brutal torture and murder of the person who is supposed to be at the center of the faith. A man who probably didn’t exist and even if there was a real person to provide a kernel of veracity to the religion, there’s no evidence at all that the events of the new testament even happened.

So a huge segment of western society has been based on the intentionally created lessons of what happens when you challenge authority and not in a positive light. It likely explains why there is so much abuse of authority in most Christian based faiths and why western civilization itself seems to be based on abuse of power at the highest to the lowest levels. Christ is the archetype scapegoat and Christianity is really about how to target the vulnerable and achieve power from the destruction this does to society.

Fascism is merely an attempt to codify this abuse of power and make it all pervasive which is why any real sense of freedom and value of individual life soon disappears within a truly fascist society.

Sure there is fascism in America, there is fascism in any society in the presence of that segment of society which given the opportunity while completely deny the rights and freedoms of the rest of society in the mindless pursuit of their own interests. We refer to them as sociopaths and psychopaths and try to define them in terms that make any sense but I’m not sure that is possible. In the end they represent that element of nature that is defined by pure chaos… and the US now has a “president” that is guided almost entirely by this desire to destroy…

[ Edited: 28 August 2017 08:52 AM by DougC ]
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