Usage of the word “science”
Posted: 16 October 2017 04:07 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I’ve noticed people using the word “science” to mean things discovered by science, not the scientific process itself. For example, someone describes how a wing creates lift as “science” whereas it’s actually physics. The wing isn’t doing research and testing hypotheses and so on.

Is the colloquial usage of “science” changing?

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Posted: 16 October 2017 06:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 16 October 2017 04:07 PM

I’ve noticed people using the word “science” to mean things discovered by science, not the scientific process itself. For example, someone describes how a wing creates lift as “science” whereas it’s actually physics. The wing isn’t doing research and testing hypotheses and so on.

Is the colloquial usage of “science” changing?

No, it’s the standard use of the word science and it’s not changing.

Dictionary.com defines science as:

1. a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws:
the mathematical sciences.
2. systematic knowledge of the physical or material world gained through observation and experimentation.
3. any of the branches of natural or physical science.

Physics is science.

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Posted: 25 October 2017 10:24 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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TromboneAndrew - 16 October 2017 04:07 PM

I’ve noticed people using the word “science” to mean things discovered by science, not the scientific process itself. For example, someone describes how a wing creates lift as “science” whereas it’s actually physics. The wing isn’t doing research and testing hypotheses and so on.

Is the colloquial usage of “science” changing?

Haven’t people always just used it that way? I mean if your post is about changes in colloquial language, well that’s pretty slim pickens as far as a discussion topic goes.

There are plenty of other examples too, like “wow how’d he do that?”...“it’s art man”. Or why that guy come running to save his wife? “It’s love”. No biggie with any of these. Although I suspect LoisL would object…“it was not love, it was simply the proper hormonal response to a psychologically intense situation”. To which I’d reply, geeze, put a little poetry in your life dude.

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