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Someone please tell me that this isn’t real
Posted: 17 July 2007 01:44 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
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narwhol - 17 July 2007 01:17 PM

we don’t even have a bible belt over here and most people wouldn’t wear one even there was such a thing.

We? You don’t mean the EU, do you? Don’t forget your “new country”, the European Union, now also includes Sicily, for example – religious enough for me. And wait until Turkey joins in…

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Posted: 17 July 2007 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
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What you say seems to support my older view. I also see a couple of figures showing the incredible scientific iliteracy in the USA society, but societies with better scientific literacy levels show a poorer scientific production levels.

No, Barto. There are pockets of sanity in the Bible Belt and it is generally on State ran universities.  Now the religious universities and colleges are not quite as literate as the Secular universities, but they can surprise us sometimes.

A Bible Belt in Canada?  I want to know where too so I can avoid it if I ever go up there again.  The Fundies here terrify me sometimes with their behaviours.  They can get really vocal and really hateful.  That is the biggest thing that bothers me about Fundies, esp when one looks at the violent history of X-ianity.  That and they really are anti-intellectual.

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Posted: 17 July 2007 02:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
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George - 17 July 2007 01:44 PM
narwhol - 17 July 2007 01:17 PM

we don’t even have a bible belt over here and most people wouldn’t wear one even there was such a thing.

We? You don’t mean the EU, do you? Don’t forget your “new country”, the European Union, now also includes Sicily, for example – religious enough for me. And wait until Turkey joins in…

Looks like we might have a bible thread and may even acquire a quran lace then.

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Posted: 17 July 2007 08:04 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
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George - 17 July 2007 01:44 PM

We? You don’t mean the EU, do you? Don’t forget your “new country”, the European Union, now also includes Sicily, for example – religious enough for me. And wait until Turkey joins in…

I guess Poland could fill the gap while waiting for Turkey.

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Posted: 18 July 2007 01:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
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Doesn’t count as a bible belt - it’s catholic.  How many catholics do you know who have even read the bible, let alone quote from it or believe it to be literally true - I even know catholics who think most of it (almost all the old testament and some of the new) is pretty nasty stuff.  And you don’t tend to get preachers in the catholic religion.  So no, Poland bears almost no relation to a bible belt.

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Posted: 18 July 2007 01:23 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
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I go to work and I loose count how many times the three fundies I work with bring up JC, in a 4-5 hour period, and how he did this or that in their lives and others- including mine.  rolleyes  I would like to know how they know that last, esp when I did it myself and not some supernatural deity.  I keep my mouth shut so I don’t cause trouble and loose my job- even if it is part-time and not a job I want.  :(  It’s all delusional insanity.  rolleyes

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Posted: 18 July 2007 01:35 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
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Mriana - 18 July 2007 01:23 PM

I would like to know how they know that last

Because our lord told them; that’s how.

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Posted: 18 July 2007 01:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
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RIIIIGHT!  And I talk to Casper the Friendly Ghost every day all day long.  rolleyes  I can not see any rationality in such an answer, but then again, when have Fundies ever been rational?  (That’s retorical Narwhol, unless of course you can name a rational Fundie).

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Posted: 18 July 2007 02:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
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Mriana - 18 July 2007 01:23 PM

I go to work and I loose count how many times the three fundies I work with bring up JC, in a 4-5 hour period, and how he did this or that in their lives and others- including mine.

I don’t think the Canadian ‘bible belt’ would compare with the US in that way - I would say the majority of christians here have what I would call a ‘quiet faith’.  And most that I know are very tolerant of and respectful toward other ideas and religions even if they don’t agree.  I don’t know how I can say majority or most, but I guess just based on who I’ve met.  But ‘outsiders’, or people like my sister who’s moved away, says she will never move back just because of how sheltered it is in our town.  When our kids are a little older we want to travel a bit and I think that would give me a good perspective.  However, when we were first married, we went to another province on the east coast - I don’t want to say where because I feel bad - the communities weren’t Christian, but still seemed very small town claustrophobic feeling to me.  A lot of people that talked about everyone and were opinionated and judgemental.  So I don’t know if it’s religion or just small town sometimes.  I’ve worked at lots of places and no place was like that except for church, and the church I went to, wished it was like that where everyone would talk about jesus in the workplace.  And that church is kind of the oddball in town because it’s not mennonite and pretty well every other church is.  Even though everyone that attends the vineyard is a mennonite.  anyways…

But please don’t judge an area even if it is called ‘bible belt’.  I think there’s lots of great people here inspite of the title….  smile

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Posted: 19 July 2007 04:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
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Quebec is fairly secular because of the reaction against the church back in the 60’s.  It could almost be a case study of what happens when you actually separate church and state.

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Posted: 19 July 2007 10:13 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
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narwhol - 18 July 2007 01:09 PM

Doesn’t count as a bible belt - it’s catholic.  How many catholics do you know who have even read the bible, let alone quote from it or believe it to be literally true - I even know catholics who think most of it (almost all the old testament and some of the new) is pretty nasty stuff.  And you don’t tend to get preachers in the catholic religion.  So no, Poland bears almost no relation to a bible belt.

You are right, catholic church is not a monolitic and homogenous thing. There are a lot of diferents inclinations, both in economical and social issues ( the whole u.s. christian comunity, on the other hands, seems conservative ). But the catholic church has a strong conservative wing, expressed on the opus dei and the ‘legionarios de cristo’ orders.

It’s true that catholic church has almost no ‘bible literalist’, and it’s likely the most open religion to science, but there, again, there are orders, no minor orders, on the conservative wing that are opposed to secular values and some of their important members seems reluctant to what JPII once lukewarmly admitted (the evolution)

At least here, the catholic church is far from being tolerant with diferents values.

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Posted: 19 July 2007 10:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
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And let’s not forget the church’s position on AIDS. Also, the Catholic Church has done more damage to the humankind than any other religion, making an enormous amount of money in that process. I don’t wish to sound like Che Guevara, but I’d like to see them to give some of the money back; it disgusts me to see them preaching “love” while millions of people in Africa are dying of hunger and diseases.

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Posted: 19 July 2007 10:46 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
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George - 19 July 2007 10:33 AM

I don’t wish to sound like Che Guevara, but I’d like to see them to give some of the money back;

Well, I’m far more shy on this. I’d consider myself satisfied if they just ended to reclaim public money to support their belief and stoped to try to include in the laws the basis of their dogma. I am willing to forget the pass if they change in the future.

eit disgusts me to see them preaching “love” while millions of people in Africa are dying of hunger and diseases.

I live in a underdeveloped country, so I don’t go as far as Africa to find this kind of things.Here, pay for you own contraconceptive device (a intrauterine, pills, or condons) is not a option for a lot of persons. So, the right way to let this people plan their paternity is to include contraconception in public hospitals. Of course, this had the strong opposition of the church.

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Posted: 19 July 2007 10:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
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I’d just like to know how much money Vatican has…

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Posted: 19 July 2007 01:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
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I agree with the point that Catholicism is not as monolithic as people suppose (much to the pope’s dismay, as he is always trying futilely to gather the flock back together). I grew up doing social service work with liberation theology-minded leftist catholics, including a number of bearded, motercycle-riding Jesuit priests, who referred to JPII as “Flat-Earth John” and spent a great deal more time living the ideas they thought JC should stand for, primarily service to the poor, than trying to spread their religion or control anyone’s sexual behavior. I didn’t agree with their metaphysics, but I respected their sincerity and their values whatever the supposed source, and I think we risk becoming like our enemies on the fundamentalist side if we charicature and demonize believers and lump them all into one stereotype. Now does all this good work balance out the evil the Church as an institution and individual Catholics have done? I don’t know, does German art and science balance out the Holocaust, does American cultural and scientific innovations balance out Abu Ghraib/Mi Lai/etc ad nauseum? I don’t think such balance sheets are useful. I don’t know that you can say Catholics as a group are any better or worse than other Christians.

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