2 of 7
2
Chiropractors?
Posted: 10 March 2008 10:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 16 ]
Jr. Member
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2008-03-10

I am wary of anyone who is taking my money to provide me with a good or service.  I don’t trust big medicine any more than I trust chiro’s. 

My boss recently experienced some major back pain due to heavy lifting.  He went to a chiro and got an adjustment.  An hour later he comes back to work and is in way more pain.  I called one of my good friends, who is a chiropratic student, and asked her advice.  She said, hands down, that the chiro was just out to adjust him for the quick money.  Apparently all chiro’s know that adjusting someone’s spine too soon after a pain occurs is basically wreaking way more havoc.  What should have happened is that the secretary had him fill out a form about his pain and then even she would have been able to say that the best thing would be to ice it. (ice has existed since water and below freezing temps have, funny how water is always best) Sucks to be be my boss, and his wallet.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2008 05:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 17 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  475
Joined  2008-03-08
mckenzievmd - 10 March 2008 08:45 PM

Well, the question is does a chiropractor put something back into position that has come out of position. There is no evidence that this happens. Radiograps and other imaging don’t show the “subluxations” chiropractors talk about, they cannot reliable and repeataly locate them, and the most likely conclusion is they don’t exist.

Now, this is different from saying do you feel less pain or more mobility after an adjustment. You very well might, for a variety of reasons, some psychological, some involving local changes in blood flow, endogenous opiate release, etc. A Doug points out, people feel more relaxed and more limber after a good massage too. Doesn’t mean the massage therapist “fixed” anything that was “wrong,” just that having someone rub your joints and muscles feels good. I’ve got no complaints about that, so long as chiropractors don’t keep pushing this idea, that the evidence is firmly against, that they are identifying and treating something abnormal or pathological.

It may very well just be my personal experience. But I’m curious, have you ever had an adjustment? From my experience, it’s very difficult for me to say that something didn’t just happen (pain/discomfort relief or increased mobility) after an adjustment. It’s difficult for me to say that there is just a psychological effect happening. Then again, this is just my experience and I don’t know the studies.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 11 March 2008 07:47 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 18 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4108
Joined  2006-11-28

Never had one myself. And I’m not saying “something” didn’t happen. I’m just saying it’s not what the chiropractor says it is. I think it is painful but beyond a shadow of a doubt that our personal experiences, especially with respect to such subjective issues such as pain relief, are far inferior to organized scientific research when it comes to evaluating the effect of a medical therapy. Thousands of people for thousands of years believed therapeutic bloodletting made them feel better, and it did, but it was medically useless and probably even harmful. It was just a great placebo. Chiropractic probably has a much lower chance of doing harm than that, but it’s an example of how useless anecdote is in determining whether something is physiologically real.

I don’t tell people not to have it done if it makes them feel better. But I think it is very clear from the data that the subluxation idea is bogus and that the value of the treatment is psychological.

 Signature 

The SkeptVet Blog
You cannot reason a person out of a position he did not reason himself into in the first place. 
Johnathan Swift

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 March 2008 07:47 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 19 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29

I’ve had a couple of experiences with chiropractors. After jumping into a swimming pool I developed a headache that wouldn’t go away. A chiropractor, a relative who showed up from the US for a wedding, “cracked my neck” (I have no idea what the correct term is) and the headache instantly disappeared.

The second time was different. As many people who spend most of their time sitting by a computer, I inevitably acquired an unbearable pain in one of my shoulders. After a third unsuccessful visit to a chiropractor (a friend, she didn’t charge me) I realized I needed to pay a visit to my family doctor who is inconveniently located on the other side of the city; the chiropractors are everywhere, just like Starbucks. My doctor gave me some pills and I was fine within a few weeks.

[ Edited: 12 March 2008 07:49 AM by George ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 16 March 2008 02:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 20 ]
Jr. Member
RankRank
Total Posts:  39
Joined  2008-03-04

I suppose having tried both doctors and chiropractors, yes for back problems, I used to go to the doctor to get a compensation and then after the prescribed time off and hopeless treatment, and then go to the Chiropractor and get a manipulation and back to the Doctor for a (magic recovery) clearance and back to work.
But like most things some are good and some not so and some put you on the drip feed, avoid those and go while it hurts and no more, but with back pain I find one of those gym balls a treat to keep my back in shape (yes they do manipulate the spine or are supposed to and the crink of the neck does that not release some wild energy?


Shop around
Doctors for diseases, broken bones and organ problems.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 20 March 2008 09:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 21 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  107
Joined  2008-03-19

Studies have show that chiropractors are a help in pain relief for several conditions; however, I haven’t come across anything stating they are a cure.  DO’s (doctor’s of osteopathy) are trained in manipulations of the body.  This issue with any health care professional is that you need to find one that is more patient centered and less self centered.  That can be a problem since most chiropractors like social workers, psychologists, therapists, etc. are programmed to establish a client base were the patient has to be seen over years.  There’s been some paradigm change in the community, but still finding a good one is difficult to do.  Care should always be coordinated with a physician

 Signature 

Barry Manilow didn’t write I Write The Songs. Bruce Johnston did.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2008 04:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 22 ]
Jr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  73
Joined  2007-09-29

They can certainly cure disease related to the spine, aches in the back, and spinal decay. I visit every so often when my neck/back has been hurting (Especially from being in school all day) and I feel like a new man afterwards.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2008 07:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 23 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15435
Joined  2006-02-14
Sshado - 25 June 2008 04:46 PM

They can certainly cure disease related to the spine, aches in the back, and spinal decay.

Hmmm ... it’s one thing to say that they can make your back feel better, and another to claim that they can cure diseases of the spine. There is no way they could cure “spinal decay” (loss of spinal bone density?) by manipulations. So we have to be very careful here in attributing to chiropractors abilities that they may claim to have but simply do not.

What they are doing, in the final analysis, is deep massage of the spine. That may indeed be beneficial to certain sorts of muscle aches, stress problems, and perhaps a small number of so-called “misalignments”. (If there really are such).

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 25 June 2008 09:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 24 ]
Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  122
Joined  2008-06-20

Chiropractors are frauds in my opinion. I suffered from back pain as a result of my job. Started seeing a chiropractor three times a week (his recommendation) at $15.00 per visit. After two months of treatment for my “subluxation” there was no noticeable difference. A co-worker suggested I see a Remedial Massage Therapist he had been to. Two visits and $100.00 later my back was fine for about 6 months straight.

I now get a massage around three times a year and have been pretty-much pain free since.

My $0.02…

 Signature 

I’m not sayin’....
I’m just sayin’....

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 June 2008 05:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 25 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  3121
Joined  2008-04-07

Even a blind squirrel occasionally finds a nut. There will be the odd case where a misalignment is pinching a nerve and will be resolved by a chiropractor. That does not generally justify the “profession,” however.

 Signature 

Turn off Fox News - Bad News For America
(Atheists are myth understood)

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 June 2008 06:53 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 26 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29
traveler - 26 June 2008 05:34 AM

Even a blind squirrel occasionally finds a nut.

I’ve never heard this one before. I like it. LOL Very useful when discussing any type of this so-called “alternative” medicine BS.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 June 2008 12:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 27 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  2457
Joined  2008-06-03

Speaking of shady Chiropractors, check this link out: Chiropractor Tells Patient “I’m sorry you don’t take your health seriously, come back when you do”

Unbelievable. He wouldn’t show the guy his x-rays until he attended a “seminar” on payment plans and financing options.

 Signature 

Some people can read War and Peace and come away thinking it’s a simple adventure story. Others can read the ingredients on a chewing gum wrapper and unlock the secrets of the universe.    - Lex Luthor

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 October 2008 06:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 28 ]
Jr. Member
Rank
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2008-10-13

I will share my expereince of why chirpractic can be dangerous. Mainly because these practitioners may have strange beliefs over the nature of illness, because they do not liaise with other medical professionals and because their manipulations have been known to cause strokes.
Many years ago I injured my neck in an accident as a teenager, and have suffered with varying degrees of neck and back pain since then. A couple of years ago the pain became intense, shortly before I was due to take a holiday. Not wanting to spend the week away in pain I contacted a local chiropractor on the advice of a friend. I received what was basically a very deep massage, and left 30 minutes later with slightly looser muscles and nearly £100 less in the bank. I felt a little woozy that evening and put it down to the massage.
After my holiday I went back for the advised follow up appiontment, 15 minutes this time, and £60. The chiropractor told me I would need twice weekly visits (something I certainly could not afford) and aid he needed to manipulate my neck. He asked me to lay on my front and then grabbed my head and wrenched it sideways with a loud crack.
I immediately felt very sick and dizzy and almost fainted. I was told this was a normal reaction and to go home and drink plenty of water.
I went home in a taxi and within an hour I was numb and tingly all down one side of my body, very dizzy and feeling sick. My boyfriend kept on at em to see a doctor and the next morning when I still flet odd I did so.
The GP advised me to go to the local hospital for an xray and referred me to an orthopaedic doctor. The Xray showed I had an “osteophyte”, a sharp little bone growth at the site on the vertabrae that I had dmaged all those years before. Apparently this is like scar tissue. However as mine was on the inside edge of a vertabrae (or so I was told by the specialist) the sharp movement by the chiroporactor had trapped a nerve. The specialist advised me not to see a chiropractor again, and I was referred for physiotherapy on my neck.
This demonstrates the potential dangers of chiropracty - the outcome could have been much worse.
I realise that this is an anecdotal story and not scientific evidence, but I feel it does show the potential risks involved.
I later did research which showed the possible link between stroke and neck manipulation.
I would advise anyone interested in this or any CAM to read “trick or treatment”, “bad medicine” and “bad science”, 3 excellent books.

 Signature 

http://www.whatwouldnikkido.com

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 October 2008 07:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 29 ]
Moderator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4108
Joined  2006-11-28

Thanks for the contribution! Trick or Treatment is one of the best books by far at objectively and fairly evaluating CAM therapies. Mild side effects from chriopractic treatment (headache, dizziness, transient numbness, soreness) occur in about 50% of patients treated. Severe side effects, including stroke, fractures, and ruptured disks, are pretty rare, but since the benefit of the treatment is small, and no better than conventional medical therapy (NSAIDs, physical therapy, or a good massage), there is no reason to take the risk.

 Signature 

The SkeptVet Blog
You cannot reason a person out of a position he did not reason himself into in the first place. 
Johnathan Swift

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 October 2008 05:41 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 30 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9301
Joined  2006-08-29
bitchin atheist - 13 October 2008 06:03 PM

“trick or treatment”

Love that title. Very appropriate!  grin

Profile
 
 
   
2 of 7
2
 
‹‹ A Rant      Magnetic Therapy ››