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Deeper than primes
Posted: 07 September 2007 04:52 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 46 ]
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narwhol - 07 September 2007 02:50 PM

Yep.  And I have to say, I can’t see the theory or the relation to observable phenomena here.  However, I can always accept that this might just be my lack of understanding or you not explaining it in a way that a physicist can understand (you may have already worked out a link to the physics of it and that may be so obvious to you that you have skipped on a fair few frames), or it may be that your theory is not consistent with physical reality; who knows.

Riemann’s geometry or Galois groups are two examples of mthematical theories that were defined before they were used as applied tools of Physics.

So, time is not important, notion is important.

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Posted: 09 September 2007 08:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 47 ]
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I wouldn’t dispute that.  Also, if your theory had no demonstrable value and was fanciful nonsense, I would be on you like a tonne of bricks because I’m an irrascible, sarcastic individual who doesn’t suffer fools too gladly.  This theory of yours certainly shows correlation to certain symmetrical wave-like geometries and that correlation may indeed at some point in the future find causality and applicability in physical systems.  Even if they don’t, I admire pure mathematics and believe they have value in themselves.

However, you appear to be trying to do too much.  If you were to frame this as a paper and leave your claims to prime numbers having these correlations to wavelike geometries and these integer elements suggest a certain reduced complexity which may be applicable to systems in which only integer factors are allowed, I think it has value.  I’m not au fait with the state of the art in your chosen topic, but these statements may or may not be novel and if so (and if true) would probably constitute a significant enough advance.  However, making claims that this might be relatable to real quantum systems would get a reviewers back up and I think the nature of quanta militates against it.  I would submit the paper as described in the foregoing before moving on to further work that would investigate applicability. 

As to applicability, some quantum systems are more wavelike than others.  Personally, if I thought there was something in this theory of yours that could be adapted to a real physical quantum system, I would start by looking at trying to fit it with data obtained for symmetrical modes of phonons (mechanical waves with certain particle-like behaviours that put them on the edge of what could be considered quantum systems).

I hope this is useful, and good luck.

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Posted: 09 September 2007 03:02 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 48 ]
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narwhol - 09 September 2007 08:15 AM

I wouldn’t dispute that.  Also, if your theory had no demonstrable value and was fanciful nonsense, I would be on you like a tonne of bricks because I’m an irrascible, sarcastic individual who doesn’t suffer fools too gladly.  This theory of yours certainly shows correlation to certain symmetrical wave-like geometries and that correlation may indeed at some point in the future find causality and applicability in physical systems.  Even if they don’t, I admire pure mathematics and believe they have value in themselves.

However, you appear to be trying to do too much.  If you were to frame this as a paper and leave your claims to prime numbers having these correlations to wavelike geometries and these integer elements suggest a certain reduced complexity which may be applicable to systems in which only integer factors are allowed, I think it has value.  I’m not au fait with the state of the art in your chosen topic, but these statements may or may not be novel and if so (and if true) would probably constitute a significant enough advance.  However, making claims that this might be relatable to real quantum systems would get a reviewers back up and I think the nature of quanta militates against it.  I would submit the paper as described in the foregoing before moving on to further work that would investigate applicability. 

As to applicability, some quantum systems are more wavelike than others.  Personally, if I thought there was something in this theory of yours that could be adapted to a real physical quantum system, I would start by looking at trying to fit it with data obtained for symmetrical modes of phonons (mechanical waves with certain particle-like behaviours that put them on the edge of what could be considered quantum systems).

I hope this is useful, and good luck.

Dear narwhol,

Thank you for your open hearted reply, and good luck 2 U 2.

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