1 of 3
1
The Holographic Universe
Posted: 07 November 2007 11:57 AM   [ Ignore ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1824
Joined  2007-10-28

Is the universe and reality a holographic projection? Read about this facinating theory here:

http://www.crystalinks.com/holographic.html

Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn’t matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart.

Somehow each particle always seems to know what the other is doing. The problem with this feat is that it violates Einstein’s long-held tenet that no communication can travel faster than the speed of light. Since traveling faster than the speed of light is tantamount to breaking the time barrier, this daunting prospect has caused some physicists to try to come up with elaborate ways to explain away Aspect’s findings. But it has inspired others to offer even more radical explanations.

University of London physicist David Bohm, for example, believes Aspect’s findings imply that objective reality does not exist, that despite its apparent solidity the universe is at heart a phantasm, a gigantic and splendidly detailed hologram.

An impressive body of evidence suggests that the brain uses holographic principles to perform its operations. Pribram’s theory, in fact, has gained increasing support among neurophysiologists.

Pribram’s belief that our brains mathematically construct “hard” reality by relying on input from a frequency domain has also received a good deal of experimental support.

But the most mind-boggling aspect of Pribram’s holographic model of the brain is what happens when it is put together with Bohm’s theory. For if the concreteness of the world is but a secondary reality and what is “there” is actually a holographic blur of frequencies, and if the brain is also a hologram and only selects some of the frequencies out of this blur and mathematically transforms them into sensory perceptions, what becomes of objective reality?

Put quite simply, it ceases to exist. As the religions of the East have long upheld, the material world is Maya, an illusion, and although we may think we are physical beings moving through a physical world, this too is an illusion.

This striking new picture of reality, the synthesis of Bohm and Pribram’s views, has come to be called the Holographic Paradigm, and although many scientists have greeted it with skepticism, it has galvanized others. A small but growing group of researchers believe it may be the most accurate model of reality science has arrived at thus far.

More than that, some believe it may solve some mysteries that have never before been explainable by science and even establish the paranormal as a part of nature. Numerous researchers, including Bohm and Pribram, have noted that many para-psychological phenomena become much more understandable in terms of the holographic paradigm.

In a universe in which individual brains are actually indivisible portions of the greater hologram and everything is infinitely interconnected, telepathy may merely be the accessing of the holographic level. It is obviously much easier to understand how information can travel from the mind of individual ‘A’ to that of individual ‘B’ at a far distance point and helps to understand a number of unsolved puzzles in psychology. In particular, Stansilov Grof feels the holographic paradigm offers a model for understanding many of the baffling phenomena experienced by individuals during altered states of consciousness.

Whether Bohm and Pribram’s holographic paradigm becomes accepted in science or dies an ignoble death remains to be seen, but it is safe to say that it has already had an influence on the thinking of many scientists. And even if it is found that the holographic model does not provide the best explanation for the instantaneous communications that seem to be passing back and forth between subatomic particles, at the very least, as noted by Basil Hiley, a physicist at Birbeck College in London, Aspect’s findings indicate that we must be prepared to consider radically new views of reality.

From the Scientific American article (August 2003) on the holographic universe:

An astonishing theory called the holographic principle holds that the universe is like a hologram: just as a trick of light allows a fully three-dimensional image to be recorded on a flat piece of film, our seemingly three-dimensional universe could be completely equivalent to alternative quantum fields and physical laws “painted” on a distant, vast surface.

The physics of black holes—immensely dense concentrations of mass—provides a hint that the principle might be true. Studies of black holes show that, although it defies common sense, the maximum entropy or information content of any region of space is defined not by its volume but by its surface area.

Physicists hope that this surprising finding is a clue to the ultimate theory of reality.

What do you think? Does it open a can of worms regarding reality, spirituality, the paranormal, aliens etc.?

 Signature 

I am, therefore I think.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14
kkwan - 07 November 2007 11:57 AM

What do you think? Does it open a can of worms regarding reality, spirituality, the paranormal, aliens etc.?

No, why would it?

Also, I’d pay attention to the website where you got that info ... not everything on the internet is credible.

I’d also check out the relevant wiki page HERE.

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29
kkwan - 07 November 2007 11:57 AM

Aspect and his team discovered that under certain circumstances subatomic particles such as electrons are able to instantaneously communicate with each other regardless of the distance separating them. It doesn’t matter whether they are 10 feet or 10 billion miles apart.

I have been thinking about this for a while now. What if ether does exist? In this case the two particles would never really be apart.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14

This phenomenon is known as quantum entanglement. It is an odd feature of reality, but cannot transmit information. That is, particles so entangled do not literally “communicate”.

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29

Hmm, imagine an ant sitting on a sheet of plastic, which is a square 10” by 10” in size. Now, if the ant is sitting in the middle of the sheet, the shortest distance to the middle of the other site is 10”. It would take the ant some time to walk that distance. But if he poked the plastic sheet the impact on the other side would be immediate.

[ Edited: 07 November 2007 12:27 PM by George ]
Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14
George - 07 November 2007 12:24 PM

Hmm, imagine an ant sitting on a sheet of plastic, which is a square 10” by 10” in size. Now, if the ant is sitting in the middle of the sheet, the shortest distance to the middle of the other site is 10”. It would take the ant some time to walk that distance. But if he poked the plastic sheet the impact on the other side would be immediate.

No, it wouldn’t. (We discussed this at some length in another thread). And anyway that doesn’t have anything to do with quantum entanglement ... it’s a separate issue.

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29

I just though that if time-space was some sort of a substance (ether) and you would affect it in one spot, there could possibly be an instant impact “on the other side” (wherever, or whatever, that would be). I am not talking about transforming information across the universe, but rather to the other side of the universe – because if ether existed it could possibly have two sides, just like a sheet of paper.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:43 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14
George - 07 November 2007 12:39 PM

I just though that if time-space was some sort of a substance (ether) and you would affect it in one spot, there could possibly be an instant impact “on the other side” (wherever, or whatever, that would be). I am not talking about transforming information across the universe, but rather to the other side of the universe – because if ether existed it could possibly have two sides, just like a sheet of paper.

ohh

Sorry, not following that.

There’s a lot of way-out speculative stuff in cosmology ... I wouldn’t take any of it very seriously until it’s been backed up by some pretty good experimental evidence, anyhow.

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29

Speculative stuff? Yes. In cosmology? No. Call it a creative daydreaming. :grin:

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 12:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1824
Joined  2007-10-28
dougsmith - 07 November 2007 12:03 PM
kkwan - 07 November 2007 11:57 AM

What do you think? Does it open a can of worms regarding reality, spirituality, the paranormal, aliens etc.?

No, why would it?

Also, I’d pay attention to the website where you got that info ... not everything on the internet is credible.

I’d also check out the relevant wiki page HERE.

If reality is an illusion, then anything can happen. Time and space is also an illusion. Someone or something could then find a “short-cut” to transcend time and space.

I am aware the website has a “spirituality” stance. I have also checked your wiki article. Thanks.

Here is another website on the holographic principle:

http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/gr/public/holo/

Plato, the great Greek philosopher, wrote a series of `Dialogues’ which summarized many of the things which he had learned from his teacher, who was the philosopher Socrates. One of the most famous of these Dialogues is the `Allegory of the Cave’. In this allegory, people are chained in a cave so that they can only see the shadows which are cast on the walls of the cave by a fire. To these people, the shadows represent the totality of their existence - it is impossible for them to imagine a reality which consists of anything other than the fuzzy shadows on the wall.

However, some prisoners may escape from the cave; they may go out into the light of the sun and behold true reality. When they try to go back into the cave and tell the other captives the truth, they are mocked as madmen.

Of course, to Plato this story was just meant to symbolize mankind’s struggle to reach enlightenment and understanding through reasoning and open-mindedness. We are all initially prisoners and the tangible world is our cave. Just as some prisoners may escape out into the sun, so may some people amass knowledge and ascend into the light of true reality.

What is equally interesting is the literal interpretation of Plato’s tale: The idea that reality could be represented completely as `shadows’ on the walls.

In 1993 the famous Dutch theoretical physicist G. ‘t Hooft put forward a bold proposal which is reminiscent of Plato’s Allegory of the Cave. This proposal, which is known as the Holographic Principle, consists of two basic assertions:

Assertion 1 The first assertion of the Holographic Principle is that all of the information contained in some region of space can be represented as a `Hologram’ - a theory which `lives’ on the boundary of that region. For example, if the region of space in question is the DAMTP Tearoom, then the holographic principle asserts that all of the physics which takes place in the DAMTP Tearoom can be represented by a theory which is defined on the walls of the Tearoom.

Assertion 2 The second assertion of the Holographic Principle is that the theory on the boundary of the region of space in question should contain at most one degree of freedom per Planck area.

 Signature 

I am, therefore I think.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 01:09 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14
kkwan - 07 November 2007 12:53 PM

If reality is an illusion, then anything can happen. Time and space is also an illusion. Someone or something could then find a “short-cut” to transcend time and space

Kkwan, I’m having trouble following you here.

What do you mean that reality is an illusion? How does this stuff about the holographic universe show that? (And I wouldn’t rely on that first website as good evidence here).

Why would this show that anything can happen?

What do you mean “transcend time and space”?

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 01:11 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29
kkwan - 07 November 2007 12:53 PM

Someone or something could then find a “short-cut” to transcend time and space.

I just did! Pay attention, kkwan. You’ll find a shortcut to “transcend time and space” through poking it.  :grin:

Profile
 
 
Posted: 07 November 2007 01:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  9284
Joined  2006-08-29

And if you poke too hard – just like dead stars do – you’ll make a hole in the ether. A black hole: a gate to the other side of the universe…

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 November 2007 06:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
Sr. Member
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  1824
Joined  2007-10-28
dougsmith - 07 November 2007 01:09 PM
kkwan - 07 November 2007 12:53 PM

If reality is an illusion, then anything can happen. Time and space is also an illusion. Someone or something could then find a “short-cut” to transcend time and space

Kkwan, I’m having trouble following you here.

What do you mean that reality is an illusion? How does this stuff about the holographic universe show that? (And I wouldn’t rely on that first website as good evidence here).

Why would this show that anything can happen?

What do you mean “transcend time and space”?

If the holographic principle is correct, then reality including time and space as we know it is a “projected hologram” of the actual reality and is an illusion:

http://sufizmveinsan.com/fizik/holographic.html

OUR INNATE PERCEPTION that the world is three-dimensional could be an extraordinary
illusion.

This surprising result—that information capacity depends on surface area—has a natural explanation if the holographic principle (proposed in 1993 by Nobelist Gerard ‘t Hooft of the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands and elaborated by Susskind) is true.

The holographic principle contends that an analogue of this visual magic applies to the full physical description of any system occupying a 3-D region: it proposes that another physical theory defined only on the 2-D boundary of the region completely describes the 3-D physics.

Can we apply the holographic principle to the universe at large? The real universe is a 4-D system: it has volume and extends in time. If the physics of our universe is holographic, there would be an alternative set of physical laws, operating on a 3-D boundary of spacetime somewhere, that would be equivalent to our known 4-D physics. We do not yet know of any such 3-D theory that works in that way. Indeed, what surface should we use as the boundary of the universe? One step toward realizing these ideas is to study models that are simpler than our real universe.

Entanglement transcends our notion of space. Time can also be entangled. So, it appears time and space as we know it can be transcended:

http://www.biophysica.com/quantum.htm

ENTANGLEMENT. Erwin Schrödinger called this phenomenon the defining trait of quantum theory. Einstein famously dubbed it spukhafte Fernwirkungen: “spooky action at a distance”. It is not hard to understand why. Set things up correctly, and you can instantaneously affect the physical properties of a particle on the other side of the universe simply by prodding its entangled twin.

This is no longer just a curiosity of the quantum world, visible only in excruciatingly delicate experiments. Physicists now believe that entanglement between particles exists everywhere, all the time, and have recently found shocking evidence that it affects the wider, “macroscopic” world that we inhabit.

But these problems may be nothing compared to the bombshell that Caslav Brukner of the University of Vienna has just dropped. As if our current understanding of entanglement between widely separated particles were not sketchy enough, Brukner, working with Vedral and two other Imperial College researchers, has uncovered a radical twist. They have shown that moments of time can become entangled too (http://www.arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0402127).

They achieved this through a thought experiment that examines how quantum theory links successive measurements of a single quantum system. Measure a photon’s polarisation, for example, and you will get a particular result. Do it again some time later, and you will get a second result. What Brukner and Vedral have found is a strange connection between the past and the future: the very act of measuring the photon polarisation a second time can affect how it was polarised earlier on. “It’s really surprising,” says Vedral.

This entanglement between moments in time is so bizarre that it could expose a hole in the very fabric of quantum theory, the researchers believe. The formulation does not allow messages to be sent back in time, but it still means that quantum mechanics seems to be bending the laws of cause and effect. On top of that, entanglement in time puts space and time on an equal footing in quantum theory, and that goes sharply against the grain.

Space and time have always been very different in quantum theory. A location in space is an “observable” - like momentum or spin, spatial coordinates are just another property any quantum particle can have. The passing of time, on the other hand, has always been part of the backdrop. An electron can have a particular value of spin, or momentum or location, but it cannot have a particular time.

But if time can become entangled, it should be considered as an observable, and there is no way to write that into quantum theory. “People have tried, but something in quantum mechanics always has to be violated if you want a proper time-observable,” Vedral says. “So it could be that something in quantum mechanics has to be reformulated.”

In other words, Brukner’s result suggests that we might be missing something important in our understanding of how the world works. Maybe that shouldn’t surprise us. After all, entanglement between two spatially separated objects already tells us that space doesn’t really have the form that classical physics says it does: instantaneous cause and effect across cosmological distances is not something that any theory of the universe can cope with. And now Brukner’s result seems to extend this “impossibility” to events separated in time as well.

It’s not cause for despair, though. We know that relativity and quantum theory have to be meshed together if we are to create a “final” theory of how the universe works. It is too early to read much into Brukner’s result, but maybe it is a clue about how to produce such a theory.

In the meantime, Vedral thinks he’s identified an equally significant project to pursue. If, as Ghosh’s result suggests, entanglement can produce macroscopic effects, is it such a stretch to reason that quantum entanglement might be the key to understanding life?

We know that quantum mechanics describes how atoms combine into molecules, and so underpins chemistry. And chemical processes underpin all biological processes, including the metabolic cycle and replication. So could entanglement support the emergent, macroscopic characteristic of chemistry that we call life? Reznik and Durt’s revelations - that entanglements exist around us and inside us all the time - can only add to the intrigue. “I think it’s a speculation worth making,” Vedral says. “There may be some experiments in biology or biochemistry where we can see more of these effects, interpret some of the results in a different light. It would be a very exciting find.”

Couple that with the ability to create materials that exploit our unfolding understanding of entanglement, and we might one day even gain the ability to use entanglement to create new forms of life. Now that is a spooky thought.

It gets curiouser and curiouser. Anything can happen. I rest my case.

[ Edited: 08 November 2007 06:56 AM by kkwan ]
 Signature 

I am, therefore I think.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 November 2007 07:33 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  15305
Joined  2006-02-14
kkwan - 08 November 2007 06:50 AM

If the holographic principle is correct, then reality including time and space as we know it is a “projected hologram” of the actual reality and is an illusion:

But it doesn’t say that “reality” is an illusion. What it says is that the world is three dimensional is an illusion. Indeed it is. We have known at least since Einstein that the world is four dimensional at least—the fourth dimension is time. There may be additional dimensions as well, wrapped up at the micro-scale. There may be further structure to the universe at higher dimensions if these speculations are correct.

kkwan - 08 November 2007 06:50 AM

Entanglement transcends our notion of space. Time can also be entangled. So, it appears time and space as we know it can be transcended:

I still don’t know what you mean by the word “transcended”.

kkwan - 08 November 2007 06:50 AM

Anything can happen. I rest my case.

Um, none of the articles you quote say that “anything can happen”, at least not on the macro scale, with any significant probability.

FWIW, we have known from the advent of quantum mechanics that it is true that “anything can happen” in some sense: there is an infinitesimal probability of anything happening. But again, that probability is vanishingly small.

There is a real problem with taking speculative, cutting-edge research the way you’re doing, kkwan. First of all, and most importantly, none of this is established science yet. It could be that these investigators are on to something, and it could be that it’s all hot air.

Secondly, one has to resist the natural human desire to hyperbole. Yes, the quantum world is strange. We do know that. So too is Einsteinian relativity—who would have thought that your internal clock would tick slower if you went fast enough? But the world is not maximally strange. One does have to be careful to stick with the letter of what is being claimed, and not go beyond it into further and illegitimate speculation.

 Signature 

Doug

-:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:- -:—:-

El sueño de la razón produce monstruos

Profile
 
 
Posted: 08 November 2007 08:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
Sr. Member
Avatar
RankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  4623
Joined  2007-10-05

kkwan, it is way to early to rest your case if you want anyone to take it as a scientific theory. Where is the testable hypothesis? What predictions does this holographic so-called theory make? How does one go about setting up a test to confirm or falsify this idea? So far all I’ve seen in your links is philosophical speculation, not scientific theory.

 Signature 

“In the beginning, God created the universe. This has made many people very angry and has been widely regarded as a bad move.”
Douglas Adams, The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

Profile
 
 
   
1 of 3
1
 
‹‹ TED & Edge      Google Authors ››