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Challenge to the Presidential candidates on immigration reform
Posted: 25 January 2008 07:52 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Challenge to the Presidential candidates on immigration reform

A Roadmap for Demonstrating Presidential Credibility on One of America’s Most Important Issues

I. SECURE THE BORDER

1. Border Fence and National Guard: If elected President, will you secure the border, including completing construction of the 700 mile southern border fence required by the Secure Fence Act, constructing more miles if needed, and keeping the National Guard on the border until it is secured?
□Yes or □ No

2. Border Prosecutions: If elected President, will you deter illegal entry by expanding the already successful Zero Tolerance Prosecution Policy (Operation Streamline) from 3 to all 20 border sectors, and support statutory mandatory minimums for the crimes of illegal entry, reentry, and reentry after deportation for any felony?
□Yes or □ No

3. Control Visa Overstays: If elected President, will you give our immigration system integrity by completing the 10-year past due exit portion of The USVISIT (Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology) system and eliminate other weaknesses in the system so that future visa overstays can be identified?
□Yes or □ No

II. END THE MAGNET AT THE WORKPLACE

4. Enforceable Employer Verification System: If elected President, will you end the jobs magnet by requiring all employers to use the electronic verification system to check the legal status of all employees, reduce fraud by decreasing the number of documents employers must accept to prove legal status, and will you offer cooperating employers a safe harbor?
□Yes or □ No

5. Biometric ID Card For All Non-Citizens: If elected President, will you require a biometric (fingerprint encoded) identification card for all aliens authorized to work?
□Yes or □ No

6. Eliminate Identity Theft: If elected President, will you increase security for legal workers by requiring social security earnings statements to list all employers reporting wages under an individual’s social security number so that fraudulent use of that number can be spotted and will you fight to keep using “no match notices” as evidence that employers knew they were employing an illegal alien under a social security number issued to someone else?
□Yes or □ No

III. STATE AND LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT

7. Form Effective Partnerships: If elected President, will you form effective immigration enforcement partnerships with state and local law enforcement by clarifying their authority to enforce federal immigration laws, deputizing state and local officers in every state (through the 287(g) program), offering a basic training course for all state and local officers, and compensating state and local entities for immigration enforcement related expenses?
□Yes or □ No

8. Federal Response To State And Local Arrests: If elected President, will you promptly evaluate the 27% of prisoners that are non-citizens so that illegal alien criminals can be processed and deported at the end of their sentences, and will you implement a mandatory federal response to state and local law enforcement when they apprehend an illegal alien for a DUI, child abuse crime, or any felony?
□Yes or □ No

9. End Catch and Release: If elected President, will you put an end to the existing policy that allows illegal aliens caught inside our country to be released on bail after their arrest while they await their initial court appearance?
□Yes or □ No

10. List Illegal Aliens In the NCIC: If elected President, will you immediately expand the National Crime Information Center’s (NCIC) Immigration Violators File to include: (A) aliens against whom a final order of removal has been issued; (B) aliens who have signed a voluntary departure agreement; (C) aliens who have overstayed their authorized period of stay; and (D) aliens whose visas have been revoked?
□Yes or □ No

IV. DISCOURAGE SANCTUARIES

11. Deny Federal Funds: If elected President, will you encourage compliance with Federal law by implementing a reduction of at least 10% of discretionary federal grants and highway funds to cities, states, universities, and other entities that undermine Federal law by implementing sanctuary policies, issuing driver’s licenses to illegal aliens, or offering education benefits to illegal aliens (such as in-state tuition) that are not available to all legal residents and citizens?
□Yes or □ No

12. Close Financial Loopholes: If elected President, will you rewrite the Treasury regulations to close the loophole that allows illegal aliens to open U.S. based bank accounts?
□Yes or □ No

V. IMPROVE THE LEGAL IMMIGRATION PROCESS

13. Replace Visa Lottery and Chain Migration with Merit Based Immigration System: If elected President, will you eliminate the visa lottery program and change current preference categories that guarantee automatic entry for aging parents and extended family members and replace it with a system that fairly and objectively evaluates at least 50% of applicants based on characteristics such as education, skills, English ability, and age?
□Yes or □ No

14. Pathway to Citizenship: If elected President, will you take a pathway to citizenship for illegal aliens off the table?
□Yes or □ No

15. Seek Necessary Authority: If elected President, will you ask Congress for necessary laws or funds to execute these commitments?
□Yes or □ No

By signing this document, I express to the American people that I understand the challenges of ending illegal immigration, I am personally committed to that goal, and I will take the actions reasonable and necessary to achieve it.
________________________________________________
(Signature of Candidate) (Date)

http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2008/images/01/25/immigration.reform.roadmap.pdf

PASS IT ON

;

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Posted: 26 January 2008 04:36 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Sorry, I don’t see illegal immigration as a significant problem.  Much of the problem could be solved by making the departments involved in granting citizenship more efficient and faster acting.  Most of the illegals furnish far more value to the U.S. economy than they get back, including large amounts of Social Security contributions they and their employers make and that they will never be able to draw on. 

Occam

edited to correct a minor typo

[ Edited: 28 January 2008 02:32 PM by Occam ]
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Posted: 27 January 2008 04:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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US Border with Mexico then and now.

nogales640comp.jpg
The town of Nogales is split down the middle by the US/Mexico border.
In these pictures Mexico is on the left, and the US is on the right.
In 1898 you could cross anywhere.
Now there is a 15 foot high wall and border patrol agents every 50 yards.

Ask yourself, what changed?

Why are people flowing across the borders?  What is their motivation?

Some say they are looking for a free ride.  Free health care, education, high paying jobs, home loans, safety, and a future for their kids. 

In other words, the same things we all are after.

So, why do they have to come here? 

Can’t they find the same things in their own country?

If not, why not?

Did US foreign policies, trade agreements, or corporate globalization strategies, have any responsibility for their condition?

Or, do you really believe that we, as their neighbor, are completely disassociated with their fate?

I often wonder why people don’t ask themselves these questions instead of the kind of inquiries you have posted here.

While I agree that our laws are important, and should not be disregarded by legal or illegal immigrants, we must have laws and policies that acknowledge our own compliance in the development of conditions that force people to confront those same laws in the way that they do.

To me we need to look at our trade policies, labor laws, and all those ways in which we have created these circumstances alongside the other remedies to illegal immigration that have been suggested.  Fair wages, benefits, job security are things we all clamor for.  I think this would be less of an issue if more of us here in the US were not suffering alongside these immigrants. 

These conditions are not some new phenomenon.  They have been developed over years of poor policy making, and ignored until the pressures of competition for resources and jobs boiled over into what we are experiencing today.  In other words it wasn’t a problem until we were impacted. 

People are too quick to blame the victims for problems the US helped create.

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“Life is a Blur of Republicans and Meat” - Zippy

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Posted: 28 January 2008 09:54 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Occam - 26 January 2008 04:36 PM

Sorry, I don’t see illegal immigration as a significant problem.  Much of the problem could be solved by making the departments involved in granting citizenship more efficient and faster acting.  Most of the illegals furnish far more value to the U.S. economy than they get back, including large chucks of Social Security contributions they and their employers make and that they will never be able to draw on. 

Occam

If you make the grant citizenship to all who would come to the U.S., won’t you then be obligated to grant them their Social Security benefits as well as Medicare and all the rest?

I guess you could argue that the tendency of illegal immigrants to produce relatively large families (a high percentage of Mexicans are also Roman Catholics) will help provide a way to pay for future Social Security benefits.

How about this one:  What becomes of Mexico if we allow any of her workers who wish to seek higher-paying jobs in the United States (higher-paying, that is, compared to Mexican wages) to come in?

If the Mexican worker sends his earnings back to Mexico (often the case), how does this benefit the United States?

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Posted: 28 January 2008 10:15 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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Charles - 27 January 2008 04:45 PM

Ask yourself, what changed?

The United States experienced the Industrial Revolution while Mexico dabbled in it.  Mexico’s homegrown corruption combined with the activity of exploitative foreign interests, eventually resulting in a climate unfriendly to foreign investment.  Meanwhile, Mexico has shown itself unable to effectively exploit its own resources.

Why are people flowing across the borders?  What is their motivation?

They want work, generally speaking.

Did US foreign policies, trade agreements, or corporate globalization strategies, have any responsibility for their condition?

Any responsibility?  Sure.  Does Mexico have any responsibility for her condition?

Or, do you really believe that we, as their neighbor, are completely disassociated with their fate?

Let’s not pursue the false dichotomy that if we limit immigration from Mexico we are completely dissociating ourselves from the fate of Mexicans.  Is it best for Mexico if we hire away her workers with our evil higher wages?  Who will do the work in Mexico?  How will she build her economy when we’ve lured away a significant portion of her workforce?

I often wonder why people don’t ask themselves these questions instead of the kind of inquiries you have posted here.

While I agree that our laws are important, and should not be disregarded by legal or illegal immigrants, we must have laws and policies that acknowledge our own compliance in the development of conditions that force people to confront those same laws in the way that they do.

What laws would you suggest to appropriately acknowledge our complicity in the development of conditions in Mexico?

To me we need to look at our trade policies, labor laws, and all those ways in which we have created these circumstances alongside the other remedies to illegal immigration that have been suggested.  Fair wages, benefits, job security are things we all clamor for.  I think this would be less of an issue if more of us here in the US were not suffering alongside these immigrants.

Why haven’t we put Canada in a state similar to that of Mexico? 

These conditions are not some new phenomenon.  They have been developed over years of poor policy making, and ignored until the pressures of competition for resources and jobs boiled over into what we are experiencing today.  In other words it wasn’t a problem until we were impacted.

We’ve been impacted for years and years.  It’s just that most of the impact took place in border states.  As border states are a minority, it’s hard to get changes done in the federal government.  Now the number of illegals has grown so great that the community presence of illegals has cropped up all over the U.S., and that provides greater impetus for changes at the federal level. 

People are too quick to blame the victims for problems the US helped create.

People are also too quick to relieve supposed victims of all responsibility for their condition.  Can’t we find a happy medium?

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Posted: 28 January 2008 10:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
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I’d take a diferente approach: economicaly, trying to fight inmigration doens’t pay off.

I can understand that the people who are in position to compete for jobs with inmigrants (who ussually have low specialization) want to ban inmigration, but, after all, the inmigration brings workers to an economy and it is good thing.

On the other hand, why it is legal to move capital and the workforce cannot move freely?.

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Posted: 28 January 2008 10:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
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Bryan - 28 January 2008 09:54 AM

If the Mexican worker sends his earnings back to Mexico (often the case), how does this benefit the United States?

How? So that your neighbour doesn’t live in complete dire straits. Would you build a villa next to a slum? BTW, how is Mexico a “she”?

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Posted: 28 January 2008 11:21 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
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George - 28 January 2008 10:58 AM
Bryan - 28 January 2008 09:54 AM

If the Mexican worker sends his earnings back to Mexico (often the case), how does this benefit the United States?

How? So that your neighbour doesn’t live in complete dire straits. Would you build a villa next to a slum? BTW, how is Mexico a “she”?

Context, friend.

I was responding to somebody who extolled the benefits we get from illegals.

Mexico is a she according to language tradition. Just like ships, pretty much.
http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/110006349954/en/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gender-specific_pronoun#Ships_and_countries


So, we should allow/encourage illegal immigrants to send their money back home because of their proximity?  Are illegals from Sudan out of luck just because it’s far away?

Seriously, I don’t think that the current situation helps Mexico.  It’s like putting Mexico (as a nation) on the dole.  Our policies should encourage Mexico to become more like Canada, to the extent that Canada is a healthy and more-or-less self-sufficient neighbor.  Cultural imperialism?  To the extent that what the U.S. and the Canadians do is better for those nations than what Mexico does, yes.

The benefit you’re offering from illegals is akin to the benefit one gets from giving the town drunk a couple of bucks.

Edit to add:
Building a villa next to a slum sounds like a pretty good idea.  Often it wouldn’t happen because the slum would drive down the value of the villa, but by the same token the villa tends to increase the value of the slum.  Of course, if the slum is owned by a rich guy who is removed from the site, the slum residents gain little benefit (indeed, a slumlord might raise the rent since the neighborhood invites a more monied resident).  The presence of the villa may well provide for some jobs for the slum residents, and maybe they’ll earn enough to either improve their slum or move somewhere better.

Though maybe we should focus on how bad the slum residents will feel when they compare their slum to the manicured villa (oops! more gender-laden language!  sorry!).  smile

[ Edited: 28 January 2008 11:31 AM by Bryan ]
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Posted: 28 January 2008 11:51 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
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Bryan - 28 January 2008 11:21 AM

Are illegals from Sudan out of luck just because it’s far away?

The whole Middle East is out of luck just because she ( wink ) is far away. Didn’t Cuba get a milder treatment from the US than Vietnam?

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Posted: 28 January 2008 12:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
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George - 28 January 2008 11:51 AM
Bryan - 28 January 2008 11:21 AM

Are illegals from Sudan out of luck just because it’s far away?

The whole Middle East is out of luck just because she ( wink ) is far away.

Do we put those within our borders first because they’re the closest of all, then?

Didn’t Cuba get a milder treatment from the US than Vietnam?

Sure, but very likely because we were already engaged in Vietnam, the failure of the Bay of Pigs operation and also because Castro’s was not originally a communist movement.
http://www.onwar.com/aced/data/cite/cuba1956.htm

If Kennedy’s Bay of Pigs invasion had worked we might still be fighting in Cuba.  wink
http://www.historyofcuba.com/history/baypigs/pigs3.htm

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Posted: 28 January 2008 01:30 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
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I have a feeling that the Mexico/US border situation is now beyond anybody’s control. Unless you lose your senses are start shooting every poor Mexican, I don’t see how you can prevent anybody from entering the country. It’s the same problem with Iraq. The whole thing could be done with in a couple of hours. This, however, is no longer the way we make wars. Well, for now, anyways,...

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Posted: 28 January 2008 03:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
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George - 28 January 2008 01:30 PM

I have a feeling that the Mexico/US border situation is now beyond anybody’s control.

I think we could send a manned mission to Mars; likewise secure the Mexican border to the point where illegal immigration becomes a small fraction of what it is now.
It’s important that a nation have the capability of knowing who is coming in. 

Unless you lose your senses are start shooting every poor Mexican, I don’t see how you can prevent anybody from entering the country.

The poor Mexicans need to have enough sense to recognize that they put their lives at risk by trying to illegally enter the country.  If they are willing to enter legally (and assimilate, I would add) the U.S. will accommodate quite a few.

It’s the same problem with Iraq. The whole thing could be done with in a couple of hours. This, however, is no longer the way we make wars. Well, for now, anyways,...

I wasn’t quite sure what you meant by the above.  It’s certainly tough to secure the borders in Iraq, but after that you lost me for sure.

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Posted: 28 January 2008 04:54 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
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Bryan - 28 January 2008 03:55 PM

I think we could send a manned mission to Mars; likewise secure the Mexican border to the point where illegal immigration becomes a small fraction of what it is now.

How?

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Posted: 28 January 2008 06:01 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]
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George - 28 January 2008 04:54 PM
Bryan - 28 January 2008 03:55 PM

I think we could send a manned mission to Mars; likewise secure the Mexican border to the point where illegal immigration becomes a small fraction of what it is now.

How?

Load ‘em up on a spacecraft with provisions and blast off.  Or did you mean the border?

You effectively secure the border with a double fence in high-traffic areas and patrols and electronic surveillance in low-traffic areas that provide relatively easy access.  Some areas feature such rough terrain that only a tiny trickle of illegals could cross in the first place.  Along the whole border, make use of technology to detect crossings and apprehend (and export) the illegals, while also using the information to plan additional physical barriers.

It also makes sense to use the National Guard to augment border security (particularly specific to border states).  Either that or they should change their name to something other than the National Guard.


The ease of crossing combined with the ease of finding work are the main attractants to illegal immigrants. Until the first is addressed the second one will be difficult to address.

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Posted: 28 January 2008 06:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]
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I remember as a kid, hearing hundreds of stories about people escaping from Czechoslovakia to neighbouring Austria and West Germany. The border was less than one sixth of the length of the border between US and Mexico. Even though most of the border between Czech. and Austria and West Germany was “protected” by a high voltage electricity fence, and the Police was allowed to shoot the refugees (and indeed they did), people still got through it. There isn’t enough material in the world to build a fence high enough to keep people away from freedom and bread.

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Posted: 28 January 2008 10:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]
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Bryan - 28 January 2008 09:54 AM

If you make the grant citizenship to all who would come to the U.S., won’t you then be obligated to grant them their Social Security benefits as well as Medicare and all the rest?

  Ones S.S. benefits are dependent on the amount one has contributed, so if they’ve contributed for years, then yes, they should get S.S. and Medicare.  By all the rest, I assume you mean the other perquisites of citizenship that we all pay for in the form of Income tax, sales taxes, gasoline taxes, etc.  Since, as workers here, they would be paying for them so I would assume they should get those benefits, just as all citizens do.

I guess you could argue that the tendency of illegal immigrants to produce relatively large families (a high percentage of Mexicans are also Roman Catholics) will help provide a way to pay for future Social Security benefits.

  See your last statement.  Many of the undocumented immigrants are young people who left their families in Central America.  They are much less likely to use the services such as medical and educational that their tax contributions are paying for.

How about this one:  What becomes of Mexico if we allow any of her workers who wish to seek higher-paying jobs in the United States (higher-paying, that is, compared to Mexican wages) to come in?

  Well, what became of England, Ireland, Germany, Italy, etc. when we allowed their workers who wished to better their lives immigrated here?  A person takes his/her value/needs with him/her so there would be little effect on the country from which they emigrated.

If the Mexican worker sends his earnings back to Mexico (often the case), how does this benefit the United States?

I don’t think you understand economics.  A worker contributes value to the society by his/her work and gets paid for it.  For most of us, the compensation is moderately close to equivalent to the value we contribute.  however, there are people at both ends of the spectrum.  Some CEOs get gigantic compensation for their (often inadequate) contribution.  Illegals get far less compensation for the value they contribute.  They still have to buy food, get to work, have a place to stay, so the small amount they are able to send back is meaningless.  The positive value they contributed by their work to our economy far outweighs the amount they send home.

Occam

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